Canon, Nikon and Sony News for Jan 2019 Report News & Deals  ►

 Thursday, January 31, 2019
by Sean Setters
 
Several years ago I started snapping pictures of various objects with unique, interesting looking textures and patterns which I would place in an appropriately named "Textures" folder on my hard drive. The purpose of this folder was to have a personal collection of images I could pull from whenever I wanted to create an image with an overlay. And while I don't utilize the images in my textures collection very often, I'm really glad that I have texture/overlay options available whenever an image looks like it would benefit from an additional layer of interest.
 
Below are just some of the images in my Textures folder. Looking at the file names, they were all likely captured on the same outing with the camera.
 
Sean's Textures Folder

There are lots of everyday items that can provide an interesting texture for an image overlay. As evidenced by the screenshot above, wood, tree bark, gravel, tiles, fences, concrete/pebbled sidewalks, brick walls and mud/dirt are just a few of the options that are likely only a short walk away from your front door. If it's a rainy day, you might consider photographing all the interesting textures and patterns that are right inside your home. Old/crinkled paper, patterned fabrics and wallpaper are just a few of the indoor options I can think of.
 
So which awesome image did I use to create the texture in the image above? That would be this one.
 
Sean Setters Pavement Texture

From a photographic point of view, the image above is as lackluster as a photo can be. It's a snapshot, and the subject (old pavement) is quite boring on its own. But when you adjust its levels/contrast in Photoshop, the difference between the light and dark areas is accentuated and the pattern becomes much more interesting.
 
Processing the Image
 
To get the image above, I added the texture layer to the top of my already-edited portrait photo in Photoshop CC and proceeded through the following steps:
 
  • Changed texture layer blend mode from "Normal" to "Linear Burn."
  • Added a Curves adjustment layer to the texture layer (using ALT+dragging the adjustment layer over portrait layer to create a clipping mask so that the adjustment layer only affects the texture layer).
  • Adjusted the texture layer's blending properties (by double clicking on layer) so that it would not appear in the darkest areas of the underlying portrait layer. By ALT+left clicking the "Blend If - Underlying Layer" slider adjustment, I feathered the blend.
  • Added a mask to the texture layer and lessened its visibility over parts of the face using a black brush at various opacities.
To see a larger resolution sample of the image, click on the picture atop this post.
 
Do you already have a textures collection? If so, what items have you saved in it that I didn't mention above?
Post Date: 1/31/2019 9:50:17 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
In one of the best marketing videos I've seen from the company, DJI urges its viewers to "step outside" to embrace the adventures that await us all outside the walls of our familiar dwellings. This film is beautifully shot and the voice over dialogue is excellent.
 
B&H carries DJI products.
Post Date: 1/31/2019 8:17:03 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, January 30, 2019

 
From the Phlearn YouTube Channel:
 
Today Aaron shows you some basic tools that will help skin look its very best. Learn to remove fine lines and hairs with the Spot Healing Brush Tool, recover skin texture with the Clone Stamp Tool, and get smooth, natural skin tones with Curves.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Post Date: 1/30/2019 12:39:40 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
MELVILLE, NY – Nikon Inc. has announced that applications are now open for the second “Nikon Storytellers Scholarship.” The program, launched in December 2017, is designed to celebrate the power of visual storytelling by supporting the education of aspiring content creators. Beginning today, eligible students in the United States and Canada can apply for the chance to be selected as one of ten winners to receive a $10,000 USD academic scholarship to further their development as visual storytellers and help them in their passionate pursuit of compelling stories. “We are so excited to be able to continue to offer scholarship support to talented students across the US and Canada who are exploring their creative passions,” said Jay Vannatter, Executive Vice President, Nikon Inc. “In launching this program for a second year, Nikon is reaffirming its dedication to supporting and encouraging the next generation of creators in their pursuits to become the confident, fearless voices of tomorrow.”
 
The Nikon Storytellers Scholarship, which received over 1,000 submissions in its first year, is once again open to undergraduate and graduate students in the United States and Canada who are pursuing degrees in visual arts, fine arts, journalism, film, photography and multimedia/content creation, and have completed their freshman year of college or the academic equivalent.
 
The scholarship includes two stages of submissions. The first round consists of academic and professional references. If selected, students will advance to a semi-finalist round in which they submit an original piece of creative work to be evaluated by a committee of industry professionals. This year, building on its legacy of developing innovative optical technologies that help creators bring their creative vision to life in new and compelling ways, Nikon is challenging students to showcase what "Capture Tomorrow" means to them and how they are pushing the creative boundaries of their craft.
 
The ten emerging visual creators will be awarded an academic scholarship for use in the 2019-2020 school year. Qualified students are invited to visit www.NikonStorytellersScholarship.com for more information about submitting an entry, including eligibility details.
 
The Nikon Storytellers Scholarship Key Dates (2019-2020)
 
  • Application Open: January 29, 2019
  • Application Deadline: March 1, 2019
  • Recommendation Deadline: March 1, 2019
  • Semi-finalist Open: March 18, 2019
  • Semi-finalist Deadline: April 15, 2019
  • Notification of Selection Results: June 2019
  • Funds Disbursed: August 2019
For those interested in learning more about the Nikon Storytellers Scholarship, please visit www.NikonStorytellersScholarship.com.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 1/30/2019 10:47:24 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
  • Decline in camera and vacuum deposition equipment sales due to change in market conditions
  • Improved gross profit ratio through product mix and cost reduction
  • Strived to improve expense efficiency through concerted group-wide efforts
  • Compared to last year: Achieved growth in both operating profit and net income
  • Compared to previous projection: Exceeded planned profit level through comprehensive expense management and despite lower than expected sales
Canon is forecasting a 5.0% decrease in Net Income for 2019 (across all businesses) due to the impact of exchange rates. Canon's goals for the imaging system (Cameras) segment for 2019 are:
Strengthen presence in mirrorless camera market
 
  • Expand lineup of products with the EOS R system at its core
  • Accelerate development of new products
Improve Profitability
 
  • Raise proportion of full-frame models
  • Expand sales of lenses that have high profitability
  • Expand scope of production automation
Canon FY 2018 Financial Documentation
 
Related Article
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/30/2019 9:59:10 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Upon loading the product images for the Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS III USM Lens, the first side-by-side comparison I wanted to see was of the three 400mm f/2.8 IS versions. I figured you might also want to see them.
 
At first glance, it appears that little has changed between the II (center) and III (left), but upon closer inspection, it seems that nearly everything has been changed. Hit the last link above to see larger versions of these images, but especially note that the tripod collar and foot have been moved significantly rearward, reflecting the much-improved weight distribution of this much lighter lens.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/30/2019 7:55:13 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Sony has released a firmware updated for its FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM that resolves an issue when the lens is used with the Sony a7 III and a7R III mirrorless cameras. (thanks Niklas)
 
From Sony:
 
Benefits and Improvements
 
  • Resolves an issue where, in rare cases, a SEL1635GM lens is not properly initialized when used with an ILCE-7M3 (a7 III) or ILCE-7RM3 (a7R III) camera.
Download: Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM Firmware v.03
Posted to: Sony News
Post Date: 1/30/2019 6:17:31 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Through midnight tonight Eastern Time, B&H has the Dracast LED500 Pro Bi-Color LED Light with V-Mount Battery Plate available for $199.00 with free shipping. Regularly $699.00
 
B&H customers have given these LED lights very positive reviews. At the time of this deal, 93 out of 97 reviewers rated these lights 4 or 5 stars (out of 5).
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 3,200-5,600K Variable Color Temperature
  • Works with V-Mount Batteries
  • 12 x 6 x 2" Panel, Weighs 4 lb
  • 45-Degree Beam Angle
  • AC or DC Operation
  • 100-0% Dimming
  • CRI: 95
  • 100-240 VAC Power Adapter Included
  • Carry Case
See today's full list of B&H Deal Zone Deals for excellent savings opportunities.
 Tuesday, January 29, 2019
From Tamron:
 
Product
 
  • 28-75mm F/2.8 Di III RXD A036 for Sony
Firmware v.3 Changes
 
  • This update improves the stability of control signal communication in continuous shooting for a long time.
Download: Tamron 28-75mm F/2.8 Di III RXD Firmware v.3
 
B&H carries the Tamron 28-75mm F/2.8 Di III RXD.
Posted to: Sony News
Post Date: 1/29/2019 5:07:24 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, January 28, 2019
B&H has the Godox Round Head Magnetic Modifier Adapter in available for preorder with free standard shipping on orders over $49.00.
 
The Godox Round Head Magnetic Modifier Adapter allows you to attach various modifiers to your shoe-mount flash quickly and easily.
Category: Preorders
Post Date: 1/28/2019 3:09:07 PM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
In the video above, photographer David Bergman announces that he is ending his long-running Adorama YouTube series "Two Minute Tips" to work on a new series, "Ask David Bergman," on Adorama's Instagram TV channel. If you'd like for David to answer a photography question on an upcoming episode of the new show, you can submit your question here.
Post Date: 1/28/2019 9:42:15 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Gimbal tripod heads make using big super telephoto lenses very easy. With a level tripod under them (and the lens collar tightened at precisely 0° or 90° rotations), gimbal heads allow a neutrally-balanced camera to be easily panned and tilted up or down with the camera always remaining level. All of the gimbal heads I've used provide an adequate range of motion for most of the subjects typically encountered, but occasionally, there is a need to shoot at a strong upward angle. For me, those occasions seem to frequently have the word "eclipse" associated with them and fresh on my mind is the Jan 2019 lunar eclipse.
 
When shooting at a strong upward angle with a gimbal head, the bottom of the camera will typically impact the tripod apex and that impact will solidly prevent any further upward angle to be achieved. Most of us photographers will not let gear get in the way of a good image and there are some work-arounds for this one.
 
Remove the Battery Grip
 
When the bottom of a camera impacting the tripod is the problem, a battery grip compounds the problem. Remove the grip to gain some extra degrees of upward rotation. If battery life is going to be a problem, periodically swap out the drained battery with a fresh one.
 
Warning
 
Before reading any further, I need to raise a very important point: using any of the strategies discussed below will destabilize your tripod and the entire setup tipping over will be a real concern. Use extreme caution if implementing any of these ideas and be ready to catch your rig if tipping happens.
 
Highly recommended is the use a very strong tripod (the UniqBall IQuick3Pod 40.4 for example). Extending one or more of the tripod legs longer while using the next-higher leg locks can provide a larger, more-stable footprint. The orientation of tripod legs relative to the camera's weight can make a difference in stabilization. Also wise is to strap/stake the tripod down, add weights to the tripod feet and/or to use counterweights. Pressing long, spiked tripod feet deep into the ground can also aid tripod stabilization.
 
Tripod Leg Orientation
 
Orienting the tripod legs so that the camera is centered between two of them usually provides the camera the most range of vertical motion. If the subject will be moving horizontally (solar and lunar eclipses check this box), the tripod may need to be repositioned to keep the camera centered.
 
Lens Plate Position in Clamp
 
Observe your setup and determine if adjusting the lens plate or tripod foot dovetail's location within the gimbal head's clamp will provide additional clearance. Remember that longer lens plates offer a greater range of adjustment.
 
Meade Glass White Light Solar Filter Camera Setup
 
Raise the Gimbal Head Cradle
 
When using a gimbal head with a height-adjustable cradle, such as some of the excellent Wimberley Gimbal Heads, typical is to place the center height of the lens at the axis of the tilt pivot. This position provides ideal balance and handling. However, raising the cradle higher will raise the camera higher above the tripod apex, providing more clearance and allowing a greater degree of camera tilt. The cradle is raised only partially in the above image, but this height provided enough angle to photograph a high-overhead sun (important: solar filter in use). This tactic also moves the center of gravity of the camera and lens combination when the lens is not positioned level. Tilting up will then make this setup back-heavy.
 
Use a Tripod with a Narrower Apex
 
Tripods designed for big camera and lens combinations often have big, broad apexes. While a large apex is great for strength and rigidity, it can impact cameras at lower angles than narrow apexes. If a strong-enough tripod with a narrower apex can be used, a few degrees of upward angle may be gained. Note that the tripod legs can also be the first-impacted. The top of the legs being positioned tighter together can be helpful in this regard.
 
Tilt the tripod Apex
 
If the tripod and head combination will not provide enough upward angle, it might be time to tilt the tripod, or more accurately, tilt the tripod apex to move it out of the camera's way. This may be as simple as extending a leg or two by a short amount or it can be more involved such as using far-rear-extended legs positioned in the next-up angle lock (reaching back like the wheelie bars on a dragster) with the front leg angled more sharply toward the ground and raised higher.
 
Tilting the apex of course eliminates the level base that is ideal for gimbal head use. One solution is to use the camera's tripod collar to level the camera each time it is repositioned. Much better is to use a leveling base or a tripod that has a leveling base built in.
 
Use great caution with the tilted-apex strategy as the tripod can become strongly unbalanced.
 
Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS III USM Lens Vertical
 
Reverse the Vertical Arm
 
If the gimbal head uses a vertical arm design similar to that of the Really Right Stuff PG-02 Pano-Gimbal Head and FG-02 Fluid-Gimbal Head, reversing the vertical arm places the camera to the side of the apex, clearing potentially great amounts of space. The image above shows a pro-sized DSLR (Canon EOS-1D X Mark II) and a non-gripped Nikon D850 is shown in this article's lead image.
 
Both of these rigs are shown with the reversed vertical arm as close to the center of the head as possible. Moving this arm toward the other end of the horizontal panning base would permit even more rotation, potentially 360°.
 
Assuredly, this technique is going outside of the manufacturer's intended use for this gear and tipping of the tripod is a serious risk. Consider positioning a longer-extended leg locked into the next-up angle lock under the camera and lens' center of balance. Also note that the right hand (or a reaching-over left hand) will be needed to access the gimbal head's now-right-side-located tilt angle lock.
 
Use a Ball Head
 
With the tripod foot raising the camera up and a drop notch likely available for use, a very high upward angle can often be achieved when using most ball heads. The downside to this option is that using a big, heavy lens over a ball head is not ideal and such a lens tipping over can cause an entire tripod to crash to the ground. Finding the sun and moon in a 1200mm angle of view while using a ball head is very challenging and keeping that setup level increases the challenge. But, it can work. A strong ball head is needed if the lens is substantial in size.
 
Wrap Up
 
I don't shoot at strong upward angles with my big lenses very often, but when I do, I quickly remember that camera or lens contact with the tripod quickly becomes an issue when using a gimbal head. While perhaps none of the above strategies may be the perfect solution, hopefully a combination of them can get your upward shooting angle job done.
 
Do you have a strategy for photographing upward with a gimbal tripod head that I missed? Please share it with us!
Post Date: 1/28/2019 7:37:49 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Canon has published a very detailed Devlopers' Interview for the EF 400mm f/2.8L IS III USM & EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM Lenses (PDF, 19.6 MB). In the interview, the developers discuss their motivation for significantly reducing the lens' weight and the implementation of their solutions, such as rethinking optical designs and employing the use of new glass materials and carbon reinforced magnesium alloy.
 
Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM Lens – B&H | Adorama | Amazon | Wex
Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS III USM Lens – B&H | Adorama | Amazon | Wex
 
Another resource you may enjoy is below, a video by Rudy Winston that accompanied the 400L IS III and 600L IS III's announcement.
 

Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/28/2019 7:18:37 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Canon USA:
 
MELVILLE, NY, January 25, 2019 – Canon U.S.A. Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, returns as a Sustaining Sponsor to the 2019 Sundance Film Festival (January 24 - February 3) in Park City, Salt Lake City, and Sundance, Utah. Canon will celebrate filmmakers with programming at the Canon Creative Studio, located at 592 Main Street.
 
At least 61 of the 241 films and projects that will screen as part of this year’s slate – over 25% percent -- are shot using Canon equipment. Festival projects filmed using Canon cinema cameras include Paddleton, Tigerland, This Is Personal, Ask Dr. Ruth, Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins, American Factory, Hail Satan?, Lorena, The Great Hack and others.
 
“The Sundance Film Festival is home to bold filmmaking, driven by filmmakers who push the boundaries of technology to better the art form,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and COO, Canon U.S.A. “We take great pride in celebrating the incredible talent behind the lens, and leave Park City every year inspired and honored that so many select our products when forging new expressions in visual storytelling.”
 
Canon will host Sundance Film Festival attendees for hands-on, interactive displays of Canon equipment, panel discussions curated by American Cinematographer, and refreshments at the Canon Creative Studio (592 Main St; Open Friday, January 25th - Monday, January 28th, from 11am-7pm). Inside the studio, guests can touch-and-try the latest Canon gear, including the EOS C700 FF cinema camera, CN-E 20mm lens, and the new EOS R, which is Canon’s first full-frame mirrorless camera. Also on hand will be the EOS C200 Cinema Camera, which features Canon’s innovative Cinema RAW Light 4K technology as well as Canon’s CINE-SERVO, COMPACT-SERVO, EF and RF lenses.
 
Guests can have their headshots taken by professional photographer Michael Ori, who will be shooting with the EOS R. Canon will provide guests with an 8” x 10” copy of their portrait, printed on-site with the Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 Professional Inkjet Printer. All portraits will be available online at orimedia.com/sundance after February 15, 2019.
 
On Sunday, January 27th, Canon will toast creativity behind the lens at the seventh annual invite-only Raise Your Glass with Canon cocktail party.
 
The Canon Creative Studio will feature three nights of Magic Hours, co-hosted by the AFI Conservatory (January 25th), Francis Ford Coppola Winery (January 26th), and Adorama (January 28th). Each event presents opportunities to network with companies and organizations that share Canon’s mission to support filmmaking.
 
Canon will also continue its partnership with American Cinematographer, the world’s leading publication dedicated to motion imaging and the art and craft of professional cinematography. The monthly international journal published by the American Society of Cinematographers marks its centennial this year and Canon will honor its history and industry expertise with several on the ground partnerships. The magazine’s editors will be on-site at the festival and several of its contributors will moderate a series of six in-depth panel discussions at the Canon Creative Studio. The panels will be streamed through Facebook Live via American Cinematographer’s page, allowing viewers the opportunity to engage with the panelists. American Cinematographer’s website, ascmag.com, will also feature a series of online interviews with Sundance cinematographers, along with additional articles exploring cinematography trends at the festival, all sponsored by Canon.
 
On Wednesday, January 30th at 3:00 pm MT, Canon will present a panel titled “Demystifying the Technical Process: Where Art Meets Technology,” featuring experienced filmmakers and Canon U.S.A. representatives. During the discussion, panel participants will share how Directors of Photography and directors can best collaborate to craft the visual aesthetic of a film. They will speak to their experiences on recent films to lend real-world context to their insights. The panel will take place at The Box at The Ray, 1768 Park Ave., Lower Level.
 
For a full schedule of events for Canon's activities at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival and to request access to attend, please visit canonatsundance19.splashthat.com.
Category: Canon USA News
Post Date: 1/28/2019 6:09:05 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, January 25, 2019

 
From TASCAM:
 
Santa Fe Springs, CA - January 2019 – TASCAM has introduced the next generation of their acclaimed line of professional grade handheld recorders, the DR-X Series. The natural evolution of TASCAM's highly successful handheld recorders, the DR-X Series marks a dramatic update to these recorders' already robust feature sets.
 
The perfect companion for videographers, voiceover artists, songwriters, and podcasters, the DR-40X's integrated unidirectional stereo mics with scalable A/B or X/Y configuration, dual XLR/1/4-inch combo inputs, built-in phantom power for condenser mics, integrated 4-track capability, and wired remote control option make it an essential tool for DSLR video, music recording, sound design, and more. DSLR filmmakers will love the DR-40X's Auto-Tone function, providing an audio cue tone identifying each recording take.
 

The new DR-X Series now adds a new model, the powerful yet affordable DR-07X, designed to deliver professional performance for musicians and voiceover artists. With its dual integrated scalable unidirectional A/B or X/Y configurable mics and crystal clear sound, the DR-07X is great for music recording, spoken word, and more.
 
Incorporating all of the DR-07X's features minus the scalable microphones, the DR-05X is equipped with a pair of omnidirectional condenser mics, making it the ideal tool for recording music, meetings, dictation, and more.
 

The DR-X Series also taps into TASCAM's decades of innovation in computer-based recording, incorporating a studio-quality 2 in/2 out USB audio interface that makes all DR-X Series recorders a perfect fit for live streaming, podcasting, and digital audio workstations.
 
All DR-X models boast a totally revamped user interface, making it easy to access recording, adjusting levels, deleting takes, adding markers, and other common functions with just the click of a thumb. Multi-language menus in English/ Spanish/ French/ Italian/ German/ Russian/ Chinese/ Korean/ Japanese/ Portuguese are included. And with increased capacity for microSDXC cards up to 128GB, DR-X Series recorders can literally record for days on end.
 
Other features in the DR-X Series include a new powerful bright white backlit display that's easy to see even in the brightest sunlight, as well as Dictation Mode, which enables the user to instantly jump back audio playback in preselected increments including speed control and a special dictation EQ, and Overwrite Mode, which allows users to select a precise Record drop-in time for replacement recording with one level of undo. The DR-X Series' Auto-Recording function can be set to begin recording when a sound is detected, and its Pre-Recording function delivers fail-safe recordings with up to 2 seconds of pre-record time.
 
DR-X Series recorders are available now. The DR-40X carries an estimated street price of $199.99, the DR-07X $149.99, and the DR-05X $119.99.
 
B&H has the following available for preorder:
 
Category: Tascam News
Post Date: 1/25/2019 10:05:04 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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