Canon and Sony News for Dec 2021

 Wednesday, December 29, 2021

From Yomiuri Shimbun (translated), a major newspaper in Japan:

"In an interview with Yomiuri Shimbun, Canon's Chairman and CEO Fujio Mitarai said that he would end the development and production of the flagship model of a conventional digital SLR camera a few years later, saying, "One for a mirrorless camera. It will become.""

"Canon's SLR flagship model is known as the "EOS-1" series, the first of which appeared in 1989. The latest model "EOS-1D X Mark 3" released in 2020 will be the last model in fact."

"Mr. Mitarai said, "The market needs are acceleratingly shifting to mirrorless cameras. In line with this, we are steadily shifting people," and revealed that the development system is being reviewed."

"Demand for beginner and intermediate SLR cameras is strong overseas, so we plan to continue development and production for the time being."

While translations can be difficult to accurately decipher, it appears that the 1-series DSLR line will end at the Canon EOS-1D X Mark III. The last translated line includes "development", appearing to leave the door open for new DSLR models below the flagship series.

The last Canon EOS DSLR introduced was the Rebel T8i / 850D that hit the streets around June 2020. The 1D X III hit the streets early in 2020, and the Canon EOS 90D arrived late in 2019.

Posted to: Canon News   Category: Canon Announcements
Post Date: 12/29/2021 8:13:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

Just posted: Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS II Lens Review

Upgrading to this lens can be fully justified by multiple enhancements, especially including sharper image quality and lighter weight.

Get the Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS II Lens at B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | WEX (in Stock)

Rent the Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS II Lens from Lensrentals.

Please share!

Posted to: Sony News   Category: Camera Gear Review News
Post Date: 12/29/2021 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, December 28, 2021

As I maintain a mixed kit of Sony and Canon gear, I was anxious to see how the Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS II Lens compared to the equivalent Canon lens, the RF 70-200mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens.

In the image quality comparison, the two lenses appear near equals. The Canon lens seems slightly sharper in the center of the frame from 70mm through 135mm, but any sharpness difference is not meaningful as a differentiator. At 200mm, the Sony lens has about one stop less peripheral shading to its advantage. The Canon lens has slight pincushion distortion at 70mm vs. a tiny amount of pincushion distortion. Both lenses trend toward pincushion distortion as their focal lengths are increased, with the Canon lens having less distortion than the Sony lens by 100mm and through 200mm. The Sony lens shows more color blur in the mid focal length range and blurs corner stars slightly more. The Canon lens produces slightly better specular highlight bokeh and slightly better points on sunstars.

The Sony lens mounted on an Alpha 1 in either AF-S or AF-C mode does not focus slowly, but the Canon lens with an EOS R5 behind it focuses noticeably faster in side-by-side testing. Neither lens makes much noise when focusing, but the Sony lens is slightly quieter.

The Sony lens is compatible with teleconverters, adding the versatility of up to the 140-400mm range with the 2x mounted. However, the teleconverter magnification is not without impact to the image quality, especially with the 2x in the optical path.

Most will find the smaller retracted size vs. fixed size the biggest differentiator between these lenses.

The Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS II Lens vs. Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens comparison shows, as seen in the comparison image above, the Canon lens measuring considerably smaller — when retracted. The compact Canon lens size is easier to stow a camera backpack and similar cases. Zoomed to 200mm, the Canon measures 0.27" (7mm) longer. Lenses maintaining a fixed size favor in-the-hand use, giving the Sony lens a different advantage.

When zoomed, the elements inside the lens move and repositioning elements can change the balance of the lens — regardless of the external size changing. However, the large objective lens elements remaining in position are advantageous in this regard, and the Sony lens maintains slightly better balance throughout the zoom range.

The Canon lens is slightly wider.

The Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS II Lens was introduced as the "World's Lightest Large-aperture Telephoto Zoom Lens", qualified to full-frame F2.8 70-200mm telephoto zoom lenses that support autofocus. The Sony lens is indeed lighter than the Canon lens, but the measured in-use (with tripod foot and hood) difference is only 2.9 oz (53.2g). Of that difference, 1.6 oz (13.3g) is in the hood weights. Few will find significance in the weight difference between these lenses.

The Sony lens features a front-positioned focus ring. Positioning the zoom ring toward the back of the lens provides a better balance for handheld zooming. Impacting the Sony lens's advantage is the aperture ring positioned behind the zoom ring. The aperture ring is a Sony lens feature advantage, but only for those intending to use it. Making space for the aperture ring shifts the zoom ring forward modestly, farther forward than the Canon lens's zoom ring.

The front element positioned farther forward of the mount gives the Sony lens a modestly better handheld balance at the wider focal lengths. The balance difference equalizes by the longer focal lengths.

Switches add control, but they also add complication, and the aperture ring adds two switches to the design. The zoom lock switch adds one to the Canon side of the equation, and the Sony DMF switch takes the count back to a two-switch lead. It is easier to tactilely find the Canon lens's switches, and the Canon lens's switches are less recessed and easier to use.

The Sony tripod hood is fully integrated and considerably smoother. However, the Canon lens's entire tripod collar can be removed (erasing the weight difference). The Sony lens collar's 90° marks are easier to align, and its tripod foot is removable (and replaceable with an integrated dovetail mount).

Consuming space utilized by the Sony lens's tripod collar is the Canon lens's control ring. Note that this ring can control the aperture.

The Sony lens has three focus hold buttons, and its hood window is tighter.

The additional fixed lens barrel length provides room for the Sony lens to have a longer focus ring.

At review time, the Sony lens costs $1.00 less than the Canon lens.

The bottom line is that both lenses are outstanding. Photographers deciding their camera brand choice at lens selection time will need to look carefully at the differentiating features between these lenses, along with those of the other lens models destined for their kit. In the end, most photographers with a Sony kit will choose the Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS II Lens, and most photographers with a Canon kit will purchase the Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens.

Post Date: 12/28/2021 9:46:45 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, December 27, 2021

From Tamron Japan (translated):

Tamron Co. , Ltd.

20mm F / 2.8 Di III OSD M1: 2 (Model F050)
24mm F / 2.8 Di III OSD M1: 2 (Model F051)
35mm F / 2.8 Di III OSD M1: 2 (Model F053)

Notice regarding use

Thank you for your continued patronage of Tamron products.

Our lenses 20mm F / 2.8 Di III OSD M1: 2 (Model F050), 24mm F / 2.8 Di III OSD M1: 2 (Model F051), 35mm F / 2.8 Di III OSD M1: 2 (Model F053) for Sony. We have confirmed that the following problems occur for E-mount, so we would like to inform you.

phenomenon

In combination with the a7 IV, AF switches to MF when shooting movies.

We are currently investigating and will provide details on the "Support Information" page at a later date.

In addition, customers who have registered with TAMRON BASE and wish to receive an e-mail newsletter will be notified by e-mail newsletter as soon as the details are available.

Support information here >>>
Registration is to TAMRON BASE here >>>

To customers, apologize from the bottom of my heart that you apologize for the inconvenience.

Learn more:

Tamron 20mm f/2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 Lens Review
Tamron 24mm f/2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 Lens Review
Tamron 35mm f/2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 Lens Review

Posted to: Sony News   Category: Tamron Announcements
Post Date: 12/27/2021 8:22:01 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, December 24, 2021

My family and I wish you a very Merry Christmas! As always, we hope that your Christmas season is filled with great meaning, great memories, and of course, great images.

Our Christmas tree represents a huge amount of work (primarily for my girls), and the results of their effort deserve preserving in a high quality image. After photographing the annual Christmas tree in the same location for 25 years, I have a few go-to shots dialed in.

An ultra-wide-angle focal length usually gets the selection. In addition to fitting the tree and surrounding space in the frame, this angle of view makes the room appear big, creating a more dramatic look.

There seems to be an outstanding ultra-wide angle lens choice introduced each year, and I seldom capture the tree photo with a lens previously used for that task. The Sony FE 12-24mm f/2.8 GM Lens captured the Christmas 2020 tree, the Canon RF 15-35mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens captured the 2019 tree, and, going a bit narrower for a different look, the Canon RF 28-70mm F2L USM Lens took in the 2018 tree.

Which lens got the call for 2021? The impressive Sony FE 14mm f/1.8 GM Lens.

At this time of the year, I know that I need to take pictures bracketing 5:15 PM by a few minutes to have deep blue sky color showing through the windows with the exposure balanced for the Christmas lights inside. No, I can't remember this time from year to year, but a calendar item reminds me (and EXIF information from the prior year's photos can be referenced).

F/16 images from any current digital camera, and especially from cameras with ultra-high pixel density, show a slight softness due to diffraction. However, I like the starburst effect that narrow apertures, such as f/16, create from point light sources, such as the candles in the windows.

Yes, compositing pictures taken with different apertures, f/8 and f/22 for example, could provide larger starbursts and sharper images, with still adequate depth of field. However, the points on the star rotate as the aperture is changed. This means that each entire starburst must be carefully contained to only one of the images during compositing in order to avoid misalignment.

Getting technical: if in-camera focus shift correction is combining with focus breathing, one image may be slightly magnified relative to the other, further complicating the compositing process.

Using f/16 with a little extra sharpening keeps the process simple — and the results are still very nice.

With only the tree and other decorative lights on, the exposure needs to be long — 30 seconds at ISO 160. The exposure duration means that only a few images can be captured during the perfect deep blue sky time.

Long exposures also mean that the tree ornaments must be still to avoid motion blur, and the floor vibrates when walked on, making the ornaments swing. One person walking across the room at the wrong time could eliminate one or two exposures from that short period. Thus, the photo day is (usually) selected for when I am home alone at 5:15 PM.

Setup starts about 30 minutes prior to the optimal shooting time. Due to lack of space for this composition, some furniture was moved out of the camera position. The LED thermostat light is blocked with sticky notes, oOttoman wheel tracks in the carpet are pressed out, etc.

The vertical lines in the windows (or sometimes a wall unit) on the right side of the frame look best when running parallel to the edge of the frame. Thus, a camera position leveled for both tilt and roll is usually selected. In this case, the Sony FE 14mm f/1.8 GM Lens especially impresses with its lack of geometric distortion (no correction was applied to this image), rendering the window frame straight.

I am fortunate to have a range of tripods to work with, and holding the Sony Alpha a7R IV and FE 14mm f/1.8 GM Lens combination steady indoors is not a support challenge. However, when shooting on carpet, I prefer a tripod with some weight (or spikes) to press into the carpet fibers, decreasing movement. The Really Right Stuff TVC-34L Mk2 Tripod and BH-55 Ball Head handled this job nicely.

With that, another Christmas tree photo is in the archives.


A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.

Post Date: 12/24/2021 8:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, December 23, 2021

Lensrental's list of the Most Popular Photography & Videography Gear of 2021 is up.

Interesting is that Canon took 13 out of the 19 positions, with the Canon EOS R5 in the #1 slot. Sony took all but one of the remaining positions.

Reminder: Purchase a Lensrentals gift card and get a bonus card for 20% of the value! No coupon code required. This offer ends 12/25/2021.

Renting is a great option for trying new gear or for getting otherwise unaffordable gear to use for short periods of time.

Post Date: 12/23/2021 8:36:48 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

Bad news regarding the chip shortage from Sony Marketing Inc. (translated):

Dear customers,

Notice and apology regarding temporary suspension of orders for digital imaging products

Thank you for your continued patronage of Sony products.

Currently, with regard to digital imaging products, parts procurement is delayed due to the effects of global semiconductor shortages.

Therefore, we will suspend the acceptance of orders from our distributors and customers at the Sony store as follows for specific models with tight supply.

In addition, we will inform you as follows because there is a change in the supply status of some products that are subject to suspension of order acceptance.

Suspension of order acceptance We will consider resuming order acceptance of the target product while observing the status of parts supply, and will separately inform you on the product information page.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused to our customers.

We will do our utmost to deliver the product as soon as possible, and we appreciate your understanding.

Record

Update date and timeproduct nameAbout supply status
December 23, 2021
Stop accepting orders
Digital SLR camera: a6600 series / a7C seriesAfter December 23, 2021, we will suspend the acceptance of orders from our distributors and customers' orders at the Sony store.
Production completed on December 23, 2021Digital single-lens camera: a7 II series / a6100 seriesAt the time of the announcement on November 19, 2021, the a7 II series / a6100 body (black) was designated as a “product subject to suspension of order acceptance”, but since there is no prospect of future parts supply, 2021 Production will be completed on December 23rd.
December 3, 2021
Stop accepting orders
Digital single-lens camera: VLOGCAM ZV-E10 seriesAfter December 3, 2021, we will suspend the acceptance of orders from our distributors and customers' orders at the Sony store.
November 19, 2021
Stop accepting orders
Digital single-lens camera: a7 II series / a6400 series / a6100 body (black)
Shotgun microphone: ECM-B1M
Professional camcorder: PXW-Z190
After November 19, 2021, we will suspend the acceptance of orders from our distributors and customers' orders at the Sony store.
Posted to: Sony News   Category: Sony Announcements
Post Date: 12/23/2021 7:46:08 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, December 22, 2021

The top of a mountain in Acadia National Park is a great location to take in a sunset. Better still is to extend that sunset photography opportunity into night sky photography.

It is hard to make a bad composition of the milky way, but adding an interesting foreground usually improves nightscapes. My eye is naturally drawn to mountain peak markers, and the Bald Peak marker was available.

The next step in composing this image was determining the ideal balance of the marker with the milky way, and the camera position illustrated here seemed optimal of the accessible shot locations.

The Sony FE 24mm f/1.4 GM Lens is one of the best nightscape lenses ever made. While the ultra-wide f/1.4 aperture is one of this lens's key nightscape advantages, the 24mm f/1.4 depth of field is shallow, too shallow to keep this sign and milky way sharp. Thus, this capture required an image focused on the peak marker and another focused on the stars.

Post-processing the two image stack was simple. The images were layered into a Photoshop file, and a layer mask was added to the top layer. Painting the mask black reveals that portion of the layer below, the peak marker and rocks in this case.


A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.

Post Date: 12/22/2021 9:31:18 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, December 21, 2021
 Monday, December 20, 2021

Just posted: Manfrotto Pro Light Reloader Tough-55 Roller Hard Case Review.

This is a highly-protective case sized ideally for common camera kits.

Note the current $50.00 under regular street price deal at Adorama.

The Manfrotto Pro Light Reloader Tough-55 Roller Hard Case is in stock at B&H | Adorama (on sale for $50.00 off usual street price) | Amazon USA

Post Date: 12/20/2021 9:43:59 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, December 19, 2021

When multiple animals are in the frame, the composition challenge increases considerably, and the juxtaposition becomes critical to a good image.

Spending enough time in the right remote places aids in that good juxtaposition happening.

This day brought a blue sky background scenario. The camera's exposure was set to push the blue channel barely against the right edge of the histogram, retaining the brightest blue details.

During post-processing, I wanted the animals to be brighter than the original exposure provided. Therefore, taking advantage of the Canon EOS R5's exposure latitude, the same RAW file was processed at the initial exposure and again at brighter settings.

The two files were layered in Photoshop with a layer mask separating the animals and ground from the sky. The sky adjustment contained in a masked layer permits full control of the sky brightness in the final image. The result shared here has just enough blue dialed in to not be white.

The RF 100-500 has proven an outstanding choice for run and gun wildlife photography.


A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
100mm  f/11.0  1/400s
ISO 1000
8192 x 5836px
Post Date: 12/19/2021 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, December 17, 2021

SmugMug recently released the Source RAW file management add-on. PSD and PSB file formats have now been added to this feature.

"Photoshop users, rejoice! SmugMug Source—our workflow add-on that lets you upload, organize, and manage RAW files from anywhere—now includes support for PSD and PSB files. These files are visualized on Source just like RAWs are, too. Now all your working files have a safe, secure, and easily searchable home that’s accessible from any device. So what are you waiting for?" [SmugMug]

Do you have an online portfolio? If not, or if you are not happy with the one you have, I highly recommend SmugMug. The starter plan is quite affordable and full-featured. Try for free.

Posted to: Canon News, Nikon News, Sony News   Category: SmugMug News
Post Date: 12/17/2021 8:38:18 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, December 16, 2021

Just posted: Sigma 90mm F2.8 DG DN Contemporary Lens Review

The 90mm version is similar to the other five Sigma I series compact prime lenses.

The Sigma 90mm F2.8 DG DN Contemporary Lens is in stock at B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | WEX

Rent the Sigma 90mm F2.8 DG DN Contemporary Lens from Lensrentals.

Please share!

Posted to: Sony News   Category: Camera Gear Review News
Post Date: 12/16/2021 7:52:03 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, December 15, 2021

Just posted: Sigma 65mm F2 DG DN Contemporary Lens Review.

This lens is another good addition to your your Sigma I series compact prime collection.

The Sigma 65mm F2 DG DN Contemporary Lens is in stock at B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | WEX

Rent the Sigma 65mm F2 DG DN Contemporary Lens from Lensrentals.

Please share!

Posted to: Sony News   Category: Camera Gear Review News
Post Date: 12/15/2021 10:26:43 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

The warm early morning sunlight breaks through a small hole in the clouds at Monument Cove.

As is typical with landscape photography, being at the right place at the right time was the key to this image capture. While it is easy to control the when and the where, timing the clouds is a bigger challenge, one that often involves going home without the targeted image.

When photographing a large body of water, wave action is another image quality factor involving timing. Every wave is different, and the brightness caused by air in the water changes as the wave approaches, breaks, crashes, and recedes.

This image was captured at 28mm, well within the comfortable range of angles of view provided by the Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM Lens. When creating a composition, determine the elements that are helpful to an image and frame to include only those.

On this day, the sky was extremely bright and not especially photogenic. Therefore, I chose a downward camera angle combined with a focal length long enough to include only a small amount of sky, just enough to fit the ocean horizon.

As you likely guessed, I pressed the shutter release many times while this window of light availed itself. This image made the cut for the wave position and the shadow of a small cloud creating uneven lighting on the far edge of the boulder beach. The latter helps the monument to garner more attention.


A larger version of this image is available here.

Post Date: 12/15/2021 12:07:30 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, December 14, 2021

Photographing animals from or below their level is often preferred, which means a level or tilted upward camera. However, when the scenario is right, the perspective from an elevated point of view can be excellent.

In this case, a large bull elk was defending his harem of cows in a large meadow. Getting lower was not an option, but the lush grasses and their curving seed plumes create a nice background.

The R5 put a lot of good images on the card during this bull's defensive stand. Still, the leg separation and differentiating body position especially led to this image getting selected for sharing.

As usual, the 600mm f/4 background blur makes the animal and its impressive antlers stand out.


A larger version of this image is available here.
Post Date: 12/14/2021 9:04:13 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

Just posted: Sigma 45mm F2.8 DG DN Contemporary Lens Review.

This lens is a lot like the others in the I series.

The Sigma 45mm F2.8 DG DN Contemporary Lens is in stock at B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | WEX

Rent the Sigma 45mm F2.8 DG DN Contemporary Lens from Lensrentals.

Please share!

Posted to: Sony News   Category: Camera Gear Review News
Post Date: 12/14/2021 8:16:09 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, December 13, 2021

Do you enjoy photographing details? Telephoto zoom lenses are quite adept at this task.

The trees on the top of the mountain range that makes up Shenandoah National Park are loaded with light-colored lichen. I find this look highly attractive, but finding order within the chaos is the big challenge for photographing this subject.

In this case, a tree with red berries stood out among the oak trunks lining the edge of a clearing.

Not everything in a scene needs to be included in the frame. The small berries added a pop of color. Zooming in to nearly fill the frame with the berry tree excluded much of the forest surrounding it and created an interesting pattern of trunks entering the frame.

The Canon RF 100-400mm F5.6-8 IS USM Lens was made for times like this.

This small, light, and affordable lens was ready for use, mounted to a Canon EOS R5 in a toploader case on the seat behind me. This lens's relatively narrow max aperture was wider than needed for this landscape image, and the lens's image stabilization system meant a tripod was not required, despite the strong wind pushing me around.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
325mm  f/11.0  1/125s
ISO 100
7894 x 5264px
Post Date: 12/13/2021 10:01:10 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

Just posted: Sigma 24mm F2 DG DN Contemporary Lens Review.

This is an impressively sharp lens with a low price tag.

The Sigma 24mm F2 DG DN Contemporary Lens is in stock at B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | WEX

Save the tax, use the B&H Payboo payment card (at B&H, I use this card exclusively).

Rent the Sigma 24mm F2 DG DN Contemporary Lens from Lensrentals.

Please share!

Posted to: Sony News   Category: Camera Gear Review News
Post Date: 12/13/2021 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, December 12, 2021

As I shared in The Sony a1 and FE 35mm GM Lens Capture the Exit image, the time allocated to this shoot was very short. To speed the shoot, three cameras with prime lenses mounted were in the MindShift Gear BackLight 26L. The Canon EOS R5 and RF 50mm F1.2 L USM Lens got the call for this scenario.

Noteworthy is that this image was captured handheld at "Civil End". If you are unfamiliar with this term, estimate it to be about 30 minutes after sunset. It was dark.

Utilizing the R5's IBIS kept what was not blowing in the wind sharp, despite the awkward and unsteady near-ground level shooting position.

Need a clean background for your portrait subject's head? The sky often works well for this.

Want to make your athletic subjects appear large? Using a low camera position often works well for this.

Merge the two concepts, and this image is the result.

The Canon RF 50mm F1.2 L USM Lens's ultra-wide aperture had a big role in making this image possible, and that feature held complete responsibility for the strong background blur. Despite the incredibly wide aperture in use, the background remains recognizable at this subject distance.

When the background is supporting the subject, being recognizable can be advantageous. When a high percentage of the image area is background, the importance of what is in the background is elevated, becoming critical to the overall image. Spend the time to search out supporting backgrounds for your engineered images.

While this image was captured at ISO 2500, my eyes were not keeping up with the viewfinder brightness increasing relative to the ambient lighting. Therefore, this image required +1 EV of brightness adjustment in post.


A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
50mm  f/1.2  1/30s
ISO 2500
5464 x 8192px
Post Date: 12/12/2021 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, December 10, 2021

Pattern and texture images usually rank among the least liked images I share. Still, I like them — and they are quite useful. Use pattern and texture images for subtle yet beautiful decor. These images are also ideal for backgrounds, including with words and other images over them. For example, this white ice scene would make holly leaves and red berries pop for a Christmas theme.

While hiking up a mountain toward a rockslide to find pikas, I discovered a small iced-over pool of water (welcome to the first day of fall in Alaska). The consistent pattern of ice crystals immediately caught my attention. The friends with me were not interested in interrupting the pika chase for ice crystals, but this ice pattern was one of those photo opportunities I knew I would later regret passing up. So, I quickly captured some handheld images.

With a flat, 2-dimensional subject, any focal length would produce a similar result if the same composition was included, and the Canon RF 100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM Lens provides an extensive range to choose from. In this case, the widest available focal length was the easiest to work with, including the easiest to hold steady.

While the creatively blurred ice crystals option was available, keeping everything in focus seemed optimal at the time. With a relatively close subject and a telephoto focal length, the depth of field was limited. Especially since I was working quickly, f/11 seemed the best aperture, providing enough depth of field to forgive any misalignment over the flat surface without going too far deep into the softening effects of diffraction.

The longer I shot, the more I liked what I was shooting. So, I continued to shoot additional images, overshooting to ensure the ideal alignment and pattern was captured in sharp resolution – without motion blur.

After many minutes of this perfection attempt, I hurried to catch up with the others. While I did not have the regret of passing up an opportunity, my first thought in the field was that I regretted not taking the few minutes to set up the RRS TVC-24L Mk2 Carbon Fiber Tripod and BH-40 Ball Head that were in the MindShift Gear BackLight 18L. Doing so would have made the alignment easier and would have ensured steadiness.

Fortunately, that concern was needless.

The f/11 aperture at ISO 100 meant that a 1/60 shutter speed was required to push the histogram to the right side of the chart area (white ice is a bright subject). Impressively, the R5 and RF 100-500 combination produced 100% sharp handheld shots in this scenario, despite the somewhat awkward straight down shooting position and unstable footing. Perhaps more impressive is that I managed to sufficiently square the camera over the ice (within the f/11 depth of field) for every shot.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
100mm  f/11.0  1/60s
ISO 100
8192 x 5464px
Post Date: 12/10/2021 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, December 9, 2021

Just posted: Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 Di III VXD G2 Lens Review.

This G2 lens is an outstanding choice for general-purpose use.

The Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 Di III VXD G2 Lens is in stock or available for order at B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | WEX

Rent the Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 Di III VXD G2 Lens from Lensrentals.

Please share!

Posted to: Sony News   Category: Camera Gear Review News
Post Date: 12/9/2021 7:30:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

The Capture One 22 (15.0.0) release notes provide the full details on this major release.

I use Capture One for Sony (and some Canon) image processing. Get Capture One at B&H.

Posted to: Canon News, Nikon News, Sony News   Category: Capture One News
Post Date: 12/9/2021 7:40:30 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

From Sony Japan (translated):

Notice regarding supply of full-size mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera "a7 IV" (ILCE-7M4)

Thank you for your continued patronage of Sony products.

We have received orders for the digital single-lens camera "a7 IV" (ILCE-7M4), which we started accepting orders from December 7, 2021, far exceeding our expectations, and it will take time to deliver the product.

We are currently making every effort to meet the needs of our customers, so please wait for a while.

 
Order the Sony a7R IV from B&H, Adorama, and Amazon.

Posted to: Sony News   Category: Sony Announcements
Post Date: 12/9/2021 7:23:58 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Image quality test results from the Canon EOS R5 are now available in the Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens Review.

This one is a keeper. After encountering the need for this lens many times in the last year, I added it to the kit.

Following are some comparisons. Note that I kept the RF 85 aperture at f/1.2 in these comparisons. There is no need to stop this lens down, and no 85mm lens beats it.

vs. Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 Lens

vs. Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM Lens

vs. Canon EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM Lens

vs. Canon RF 85mm F2 Macro IS STM Lens

vs. Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens

vs. Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG DN Art Lens

vs. Sony FE 85mm F1.4 GM Lens

The Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens is in stock at B&H | Canon USA (best deal: refurbished) | Amazon USA | WEX and available for order at Adorama.

Rent the Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens from Lensrentals.

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Posted to: Canon News   Category: Camera Gear Review News
Post Date: 12/8/2021 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
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