Canon, Nikon and Sony News for Oct 2018 Report News & Deals  ►

 Wednesday, October 31, 2018

 
From the Vox YouTube Channel:
 
Horseshoe Bend used to be a little-known roadside view of the Colorado River in Page, Arizona. But over the past few years, the spot has witnessed a dramatic increase in popularity. The main culprit for that uptick? Instagram. It’s now one of many hidden treasures across America that have become too popular for their own good — requiring extensive redesign to protect the visitors and the environment. With visitation at a record 84 million in 2017, America’s national parks are more popular than ever — and social media is rewriting the rules of how and why people visit them.
Post Date: 10/31/2018 12:47:19 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
I have to wonder what a model thinks when the assignment to wear a parachute dress at Dragon's Teeth (Kapalua, Maui, HI) comes in. "I get to wear an enormous dress designed to blow in the wind while standing barefoot on sharp rocks in extreme wind next to an ocean with occasional rogue waves that send salt water spray over everything nearby for an entire very hot, sunny day!" Pick me! Pick me! [Finding Nemo]
 
This model obviously accepted Canon's request and she managed the assignment very professionally. Parachutes are designed to ease the landing, but in this case, the parachute was more likely to cause a liftoff (followed by a perilous landing). I would have been more comfortable if she had a crash pad beside her, but she stayed on her feet through even the strongest wind gusts.
 
A 50mm lens does not create the extreme background blur that long telephoto lenses can create, but the 50mm angle of view allows a closer camera position that provides a more intimate look while the f/1.2 aperture still provides a strong background blur that makes the subject stand out. The look is unique in a very positive way.
 
The extremely wide f/1.2 aperture allows handholding in very low light levels but with a white dress in the sun, even a 1/8000 shutter speed is not always fast enough to avoid blown highlights at f/1.2 and ISO 100. In direct sunlight, a neutral density filter or, as used in this example, a circular polarizer filter on the lens.
 
When water is on the horizon, I usually want the image framed with the horizon level. Electronic viewfinder levels have greatly improved my original captures in this regard, but with the wind and unstable footing, I still managed to get a small degree of tilt that needed to be corrected in this image.
 
An ultra-wide aperture lens is generally selected to make use of those ultra-wide apertures. Often, especially with 50mm ultra-wide aperture lenses, the image quality at the widest apertures is not good and often describable as "dreamy". While dreamy can be nice on occasion, it is not usually what I am going for. With this lens, f/1.2 results are very sharp, showing good resolution and contrast. I have not hesitated to use this lens wide open and ... haven't stopped it down very often. The Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens is a compelling reason to get a Canon EOS R camera.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
50mm  f/1.2  1/8000s
ISO 100
4448 x 6672px
Post Date: 10/31/2018 9:32:37 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Roger Cicala has posted the LensRentals teardown of the Nikon Z 7. Here's what they found:
This is not marketing department weather resistance. This is engineering department weather resistance. Anything that can be sealed has been sealed. I’m impressed, and I will say for future cut-and-paste blurbs: this is as robustly weather sealed a camera as we’ve ever disassembled.
 
I don’t believe in weather resistance myself. I believe like life; water will find a way. I believe in plastic baggies and rubber bands. I am, however, a great believer in the idea that if you claim to do something, then [you'd better] do it right. This is done right.
 
I’m impressed by the very solid construction of the chassis and IBIS unit. I’m impressed with the neat, modern engineering of the electrical connections. Yes, I’m aware that soldered wires carry electricity just fine, but to me, there’s something reassuring about seeing neat, well thought out, 2018 level engineering.
 
I’m not here to tell you which camera is best to use or has the best performance. I’m just here to say this is a [very] well-built camera, the best built mirrorless full-frame camera we’ve taken apart. (For the record, I haven’t torn down a Leica SL.)
B&H carries the Nikon Z 7.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 10/31/2018 6:14:56 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, October 30, 2018
B&H has the new Apple iPads, MacBook Air Notebooks and Mac MINIs available for preorder with free shipping.
 
Want to know what's new? See the details here.
Category: Preorders
Post Date: 10/30/2018 3:04:30 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
After spending over a decade trying to establish milkweed plants on our property (what monarch caterpillars eat), healthy plants finally emerged a couple of years ago – in the flower beds next to our house, not close to where we were trying to grow them. While most "weeds" are not welcome in the flower beds, we embraced what we got and allowed them to prosper in place.
 
This year, milkweed plants started growing randomly throughout the yard, though frequent lawn mowing kept their visibility near nothing. After an especially long period of rain, the yard crop started showing leaves and my observant daughter spotted a monarch laying eggs on them. Prior to the next lawn cutting, she and my wife removed over 40 eggs from the rogue plants.
 
Most of the eggs were transferred to the being-tolerated flower bed plants and several were raised indoors, which produces perfect specimens for photographic purposes. The ideal time to photograph butterflies is just after they emerge as their wings are in perfect condition and they remain mostly still for a couple of hours. Knowing when that time is coming involves observing the monarch chrysalis color. Newly-formed chrysalises are bright green in color, but they turn very dark just prior to emergence of the butterfly stage.
 
I saw this opportunity coming and had some gear ready. When your camera is an EOS model with a hot shoe, the set of lighting accessories available, both Canon brand and third party options, is vast. For this image, I used a Canon Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX II Flash for a very even light on the subject. With the dual MR-14EX flash tubes configured for equal power, this flash creates a flat light, often void of shadows. When the subject is as vibrantly-colored as this one, flat lighting works quite well.
 
The background is a piece of orange paper (I tried a variety of colors) being held with a Delta 1 Grip-It Single Arm with 1" Clamp (extremely useful accessory) and lit with a remotely-controlled Canon Speedlite 600EX-RT Flash. Alternatively, I could have used a white paper and gelled the flash to create the desired color.
 
The background light being positioned behind the foreground light meant that it did not influence the lighting on the subject and the background being far enough behind the foreground meant that the foreground light did not influence the background brightness.
 
While I didn't expect the Canon EOS R to have any trouble with Canon's Speedlite system (other EOS models don't), it is always nice to have reassurance, especially for a new camera line. Or, maybe this test was just the excuse I needed to spend a couple of hours photographing the monarch.
 
At macro focus distances, depth of field becomes very shallow. One of the keys to capturing this image was to align the camera so that the wing was perfectly parallel to the imaging sensor, perpendicular to the center of the lens' image circle. Still, f/16 was needed to obtain the depth of field necessary to keep almost the entire butterfly sharp.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
Post Date: 10/30/2018 8:07:31 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, October 29, 2018
Just posted: Canon RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Lens Review.
 
This is the ideal general purpose lens for the EOS R.
 
The Canon RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Lens is currently available in the Canon EOS R kit and individually available for preorder at B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX.
 
Rent the Canon RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Lens from Lensrentals.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 10/29/2018 9:02:31 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
B&H has the Profoto B10 OCF Flash Head in stock with free next day delivery.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 250Ws, 10-Stop Power Range
  • 7" Length, 3.9" Diameter
  • Full TTL Auto Exposure Control Plus HSS
  • 0.05-2.2 Second Recycling
  • Duration t0.5 Freeze Mode: 1/50,000 Sec.
  • Li-Ion Battery: 400 Full-Power Flashes
  • 3000-6500 LED Modeling Lamp, CRI 90-96
  • 300' Wireless Triggering with Air TTL
  • Smartphone Connectivity with Profoto App
Post Date: 10/29/2018 8:52:55 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Sunday, October 28, 2018
Landscapes, weddings, architecture, real estate, photojournalism – all are great reasons to have a wide angle zoom in your kit. Now the big question becomes, "Which one?" For Sony shooters, the FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM and FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS will likely be at the top of the wide angle zoom considerations list.
 
Before we dig deeper into this comparison, regular site visitors may notice that text below sounds a lot like our Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8 GM vs. Sony FE 24-70mm f/4 ZA OSS Lens comparison. Well, there's a good reason for that – the 16-35mm lenses listed above share many of the same benefits and drawbacks as their 24-70mm counterparts when compared against one another. Therefore, much of the content of the 24-70mm comparison applies equally to the Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM and Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS lenses.
 
So, without further ado, let's take a look at these two 16-35mm lenses to see which one proves to be the best investment for your needs.
 
Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM and Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS Shared Primary Features
 
  • Mount: Sony E (full frame)
  • Focal Length Range: 16-35mm
  • Minimum Aperture: f/22
  • Max Magnification: 0.19x
  • Dust and moisture resistant construction
Primary Advantages of the Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM Lens
 
  • Wider Max Aperture: f/2.8 vs. f/4
  • More Aperture Blades: 11 vs. 7
  • AF/MF Switch vs. N/A
  • AF Hold Button vs. N/A
Primary Advantages of the Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS Lens
 
  • Built-in Optical SteadyShot Stabilization vs. N/A
  • Smaller: 3.07 x 3.88” (78 x 98.5mm) vs. 3.48 x 4.79” (88.5 x 121.6mm)
  • Lighter: 18.3 oz (518g) vs. 24 oz (680g)
  • Costs significantly less
Other Differences: Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM vs. Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS
 
  • Elements/Groups: 16/13 vs. 12/10
  • AF Motor: Dual Direct Drive SSM vs. Linear
  • Front Filter Size: 82mm vs. 72
Image Quality Differences: Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM vs. Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS
 
The FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM lens is slightly sharper in the center at 16mm and 20mm f/4 and the FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS lens is slightly sharper in the corners. The f/2.8 lens center of the frame advantage grows slightly at 24mm and more than slightly at 28mm. At 35mm f/4, the f/2.8 lens turns in a far better performance. These differences are minimalized at f/5.6, but the f/2.8 remains a much better choice at 35mm.
 
As one would expect, the f/2.8 lens shows less vignetting at f/4. By f/8, the differences are minor. The f/2.8 lens has more barrel distortion at 16mm, but less pincushion distortion in some of the mid focal length comparisons.
 
Who should opt for the Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM?
 
There are many drawbacks to an f/2.8 constant max aperture lens compared to an f/4 constant max aperture lens, including increased size, weight and cost. However, the Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM's twice-as-wide max aperture will allow you to freeze motion in half as much light at the same ISO setting compared to the FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS. If you're a wedding/event photographer, or prefer not to pack a tripod for nighttime cityscape/street photography adventures, the increased size/weight/cost associated with the f/2.8 lens will prove more than worthwhile.
 
Who should opt for the Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS?
 
If you don't often need to capture moving subjects in low-light situations, and can tolerate higher ISO use when the need arises, then the Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS offers many of the benefits of the Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM at less than half the price. For static subjects, when combined with Sony alpha-series cameras' IBIS (In-Body Image Stabilization), the Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA's Optical SteadyShot should provide even more effective stabilization compared to a lens without built-in IS.
 
As you can see by the product pictures and specs listed above, the size and weight differences between these lenses are not insignificant. Photographers who will benefit from the FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS's smaller size/lighter weight include anyone carrying their gear for long periods of time (for backpacking, vacations, long events, etc.) and those wanting to pack more gear in a similar amount of space.
 
Summary
 
With many full frame Sony a-series cameras having built-in sensor stabilization, one of the Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS Lens's major benefits – optical stabilization – is diminished. However, it does have a few advantages remaining over the Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM that will make it desirable for many photographers – smaller size, lighter weight and a much lower cost. In addition to the 1-stop wider max aperture, most photographers will prefer the FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM's image quality over the f/4 lens. For those photographing moving subjects and/or utilizing the entire focal length range on a regular basis, such as wedding/event photographers, will find the Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM to be a worthy investment. Otherwise, the Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS is available for significantly less.
 
Relevant Info
 
Post Date: 10/28/2018 7:31:21 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Saturday, October 27, 2018
I was in Aspen, Colorado for two nights and the primary goal was to capture another set of classic Maroon Bells lake reflection images that included the amazing fall aspen color. After arriving at the hotel late in the evening on the first night, I set the alarm for 2:40 AM and went to bed. Probably no one thinks getting up at 2:40 AM is fun and ... that I was dragging my wife and youngest daughter with me ... raised questions about my sanity. Still, this is one of the most beautiful locations in the country and I calculated that it was going to be worth the sleep deprivation (and potential grief from the family) to get the perfect position along Maroon Lake.
 
Upon stepping outside, the heavy cloud cover was obvious and occasional light rain followed us. Landscape photographers live for the openings in breaking storm clouds and I stayed with the plan. I was one of the first photographers to arrive at the side of the lake, but I immediately encountered disruption of the plan. The first issue was that a rope now lines the path around the lake, preventing close access to the water. The second issue was that the lake level was extremely low. The restricted access and now-distant, very shallow lake combined to provide a dirt/stone former lake bottom as the image foreground and the lake was now small enough that the reflections were rather unexciting at the proximity available. In addition, the aspen leaves had changed (and many dropped) about a week early this year, courtesy of the drought that also accounted for the drained lake.
 
I continued to stay with the plan, remaining standing in my spot, alongside a large number of other photographers, from about 3:30 AM until close to 9:00 AM, waiting for a break in the clouds. That never happened and I finally decided that a decent photo was not likely to happen. The hike I promised the girls was looking like a great option and that became the plan.
 
After all of the early AM effort, the best scene of the day showed up in front of us while hiking near the far side of the lake. An opening in the clouds allowed sunlight to penetrate, brightly lighting a grove of aspens that were still holding their brilliantly-colored leaves. The key to getting my favorite Maroon Bells image on this trip was just being out in a great location, watching for something good to happen.
 
The Canon EOS R and RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Lens were perfect hiking companions.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
Post Date: 10/27/2018 9:32:58 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, October 26, 2018
From Tamron:
 
Tamron 70-210m F/4 Di VC USD Firmware v.2
 
This update improves the following:
 
  • AF follow-up performance
A separately sold TAP-in Console is needed for an update.
Post Date: 10/26/2018 7:13:37 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens in stock with free next day delivery.
 
The Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM is easily one of the best 50mm lenses we've ever tested; compared to its EF predecessor, the RF's image quality is astounding at f/1.2.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • RF-Mount Lens/Full-Frame Format
  • Aperture Range: f/1.2 to f/16
  • One UD Element, One Aspherical Element
  • Ring-Type Ultrasonic Motor AF System
  • Customizable Control Ring
  • Rounded 10-Blade Diaphragm
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 10/26/2018 12:44:13 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
After a casual portrait session with the R and the RF 50mm f/1.2L Lens I thought I'd share a quick update on the Canon EOS R's Eye AF performance.
 
This indoor, ambient window light session netted 157 images. Of these images, 10 were 2/3 body portraits, 82 included head and shoulders (or were framed slightly wider) and 64 were headshots with a significant number of those being close to minimum focus distance. All images were captured at f/1.2 for the shallowest, most-AF-challenging depth of field possible and eye detection AF was exclusively in use.
 
Of the 157 images, ten were focused on eyelashes (usually acceptable, mostly close to the iris), two were focused a similarly-short distance behind the iris and only two images misfocused beyond iris-to-eyelash distance. The other 143 were optimally focused on the iris.
 
That the camera was being handheld with me in a somewhat squatted position and the subject standing (sometimes leaning against a wall) meant that our movement could easily have caused any of the less-than-perfect results. I remain very pleased with the EOS R's portrait AF capabilities and the RF 50mm f/1.2L is a very impressive lens, perfect for portraits.
 
The Canon EOS R is in stock at B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX.
 
Rent the Canon EOS R from Lensrentals.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
50mm  f/1.2  1/400s
ISO 200
4480 x 6720px
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 10/26/2018 9:52:21 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
From Sigma:
 
[Updated Information] Operating conditions of the Nikon “Z7” and SIGMA’s interchangeable lenses for Nikon mount
 
Thank you for purchasing and using our products.
 
We would like to share results of our further investigations regarding the operating conditions of the Nikon “Z7” and SIGMA’s interchangeable lenses for Nikon mount.
 
When SIGMA’s interchangeable lenses in the current product lineup, listed below, are used in combination with the Nikon “Z7” and their “Mount Adapter FTZ”, both AF and AE operate without any issues.
 
Furthermore, lenses which incorporate Optical Stabilizer (OS) will work to maximum effect when both the lens’s OS and the in-camera stabilization are switched on simultaneously.
 
Applicable Products
 
  • DG Lens
    • 12-24mm F4 DG HSM | Art
    • 14-24mm F2.8 DG HSM | Art
    • 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM | Art
    • 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM | Art
    • 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports
    • APO 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
    • APO 70-300mm F4-5.6 DG MACRO
    • 70-300mm F4-5.6 DG MACRO
    • 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary
    • 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM | Sports
    • 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary
    • 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports
    • APO 200-500mm F2.8 / 400-1000mm F5.6 EX DG
    • APO 300-800mm F5.6 EX DG HSM
    • 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art
    • 20mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
    • 24mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
    • 35mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
    • 105mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
    • 135mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art
    • 500mm F4 DG OS HSM | Sports
    • MACRO 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
    • APO MACRO 150mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
    • APO MACRO 180mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
  • DC Lens
    • 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSM
    • 10-20mm F3.5 EX DC HSM
    • 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM
    • 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
    • 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM | Art
    • 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
    • 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM
    • 18-300mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
    • 50-100mm F1.8 DC HSM | Art
    • 4.5mm F2.8 EX DC CIRCULAR FISHEYE HSM
    • 10mm F2.8 EX DC FISHEYE HSM
    • 30mm F1.4 DC HSM | Art
Phenomena particular to 4 lenses were confirmed after our announcement of September 28th
 
After careful investigation, we confirmed some phenomena particular to 4 products listed below. Regarding a firmware update for the SIGMA 24-35mm F2 DG HSM | Art, 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art and 85mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art, we are going to announce them at a later date.
 
24-35mm F2 DG HSM | Art
 
[Phenomenon]- It may occasionally stop recording while shooting video. It is planned to be resolved by a firmware update.
 
50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
 
[Phenomenon] - When starting to shoot with the subject completely out of focus, the response to the AF operation is intermittent. It is necessary to release several times or to turn the focus ring once to release. It is planned to be resolved by a firmware update.
 
85mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
 
[Phenomenon] - It may occasionally show overexposure when narrowing down the aperture from F5.6 while shooting. It is planned to be resolved by a firmware update.
 
APO 800mm F5.6 EX DG HSM
 
[Phenomenon] - Please focus using MF, since it is difficult to achieve sufficient focusing accuracy. There is no plan for a firmware update.
 
When the lenses listed below are used, due to product specifications, the in-camera stabilization cannot be turned off. In addition, the Auto Power Off function cannot be used. Please manually turn the power [OFF] after shooting.
 
Applicable products
 
  • Current lineup
    • 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM
    • 17-70mm 2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
    • 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
    • 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM
    • 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM | Art
  • Discontinued models
    • 17-70mm 2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM
    • 18-50mm F2.8-4.5 DC OS HSM
    • 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM
    • 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM
    • 50-200mm F4-5.6 DC OS HSM
    • 70-300mm F4-5.6 DG OS
Other precautions
 
  • Please use manual focus while shooting with lenses which do not incorporate an AF driving motor.
  • Tele Converters cannot be used together.
  • Depending on shooting conditions, sufficient focusing speed and accuracy may not be achieved. As required, please use manual focus while shooting.
  • Despite being listed above, some lenses shipped out from SIGMA before November, 2013 may require a firmware update. (Please refer to “Various lenses shipped from SIGMA before November, 2013” below.)
  • Discontinued products have different operating conditions depending on each product and their shipping period. For details, please contact your nearest authorized SIGMA subsidiary / distributor.
Various lenses shipped from SIGMA before November, 2013
 
We have previously confirmed that some phenomena such as AF not working correctly with some lenses released or shipped from SIGMA before November, 2013, when they are used on Nikon’s digital SLR cameras incorporating the latest firmware. Under this circumstance, we will update the lens firmware free of charge. If the products do not operate on a Z7, even when they are listed above, the lens firmware update may improve the situation.
 
For customers who have these applicable products, please contact your nearest authorized SIGMA subsidiary / distributor for further details.
 
*1 For products of which firmware was updated after November, 2013, a firmware update is not necessary.
*2 It is not possible to update the firmware of products for which our support period has finished.
*3 For products with an engraved edition number of A012, C013 or S013, the lens firmware can be updated using the optional SIGMA USB DOCK.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 10/26/2018 9:08:21 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Tamron:
 
Dear users and potential purchasers of Tamron interchangeable lenses.
 
Thank you for using Tamron products and for your continuous support.
 
We would like to announce that we have clarified compatibility in general operations(*1) of following Tamron Di & Di II lenses on Canon EOS R, which was newly released on October 25, 2018, with Canon Mount Adapter(*2).
 
Compatible models in general operations(*3)
 
  • SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A041) for Canon
  • SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A032) for Canon
  • SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A025) for Canon
  • SP 35mm F/1.8 Di VC USD (Model F012) for Canon
  • SP 45mm F/1.8 Di VC USD (Model F013) for Canon
  • SP 85mm F/1.8 Di VC USD (Model F016) for Canon
  • SP 90mm F/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD (Model F017) for Canon
  • 17-35mm F/2.8-4 Di OSD (Model A037) for Canon
  • 70-210mm F/4 Di VC USD (Model A034) for Canon
(*1) Defined to work on existing DSLR cameras
(*2) Canon "Mount Adapter EF-EOS R"
(*3) With the latest version of lens firmware
 
About other Tamron models, we will make a further announcement of the compatibility at our support web page once the operation tests are completed.
 
Thank you for your patience and understanding in this matter.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 10/26/2018 7:43:59 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the Adobe Photoshop YouTube Channel:
 
Learn Meredith Stotzner’s trick for switching between the Dodge and Burn Tools in Photoshop without disrupting your workflow.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Post Date: 10/26/2018 7:39:28 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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