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 Monday, June 29, 2015

 
From the Canon Australia YouTube Channel:
 
Shooting light trails is a great reason to get out of auto mode and start shooting manually. It's also a good way for new photographers to begin to use their creativity.
 
In this tutorial Greg Sullavan, from Canon Collective, talks through how to prepare for, and capture, a night light trails photograph.
 
Use his tips and tricks to win a Canon EOS 750D. All you need to do is watch the tutorial and submit your best light trail shots at canon.com.au/photobootcamp.
 
Greg's Tips
 
  • Use a long exposure of 30 seconds
  • Use aperture f/22
  • Use ISO 100 for less noise
  • Use a sturdy tripod
  • Try using a lens hood
  • Use a cable release or the camera's self-timer
  • Shoot with a friend to look out for one another
B&H carries tripods and Canon shutter remotes.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 6/29/2015 2:18:30 PM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the Zacuto Vimeo Channel:
 
Zacuto announces the customizable Gratical X micro-OLED EVF! The Gratical X is perfect for the shooter who wants only a few key features.
 
Users start with the bright and brilliant Gratical electronic viewfinder and then customize to fit their individual needs. The Gratical X will start at an attractive price point of $1650. Upon activation, the unit will have HDMI and SDI inputs, display adjustments, color bars, blue gun.
 
Additional software features like pixel to pixel zoom, peaking, false color, LUTs, zebras, frame store, HDMI and SDI outputs and many more can be purchased a la carte. Zacuto will also offer feature bundles with built in savings.
 
B&H has the Zacuto Gratical X available for preorder with an expected availability later next month. B&H also carries the feature-packed Zacuto Gratical HD and Gratical HD Kits.
Category: Zacuto News
Post Date: 6/29/2015 12:50:38 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Canon 50mm f/1.8 STM and II Lenses Compared
While the Canon EOS 5Ds review has been my highest priority, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens review has not been derailed and is also approaching completion.
 
One of the biggest differences between the 50mm f/1.8 II and the 50mm f/1.8 STM lenses, as their names imply, is the AF system implementation and the audibility differences of these systems is especially notable. The 50mm f/1.8 STM's focusing sound is greatly improved/reduced over the 50mm f/1.8 II presence-announcing buzz.
 
While much can be discerned from this post's image (the STM lens AF sound is depicted on the left), the difference that really matters will best be determined by your ears (turn up your speaker volume):
 
Canon 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens AF Sound Compared to f/1.8 II
 
The perfect lens AF sound would of course be a flat line, but ... AF moves parts and moving parts tend to make at least some noise. In this case, the STM is audible and audible enough for on-camera mics to pick up. The sounds in this example are from an identical near full extents change in both directions at full speed. As with some other STM lenses, a slow change in focus distance (such as when recording video) results in a noticeably quieter sound.
 
Much more to come.
 
The EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens, Canon's least expensive lens, is in stock at B&H.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 6/29/2015 9:10:33 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
Last month, real estate photographer Scott Hargis showed us what kind of gear he takes with him on every shoot. In this video, Scott gives us a behind-the-scenes look at putting that gear to use while photographing a home interior.
Post Date: 6/29/2015 9:05:11 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens on EOS 5Ds and 5Ds R
Image quality results from the EOS 5Ds R have been added to the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens Review.
 
This is the lens that Canon shows mounted in the 5Ds and 5Ds R product images. There is a good reason for that choice.
 
B&H has the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens in stock with a $100.00 MIR available through July 4th.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 6/29/2015 8:03:27 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, June 26, 2015
Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens
Image quality results from the EOS 5Ds R have been added to the Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens review.
 
Many more 5Ds R lens tests are coming.
 
B&H has the Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens in stock with a $200.00 MIR available.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 6/26/2015 8:44:27 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Tamron Logo
From Tamron USA:
 
A notice regarding compatibility issues with the EOS 5Ds and the EOS 5DsR, and availability of firmware update service
 
JUNE 2015
 
Dear users and potential purchasers of Tamron interchangeable lenses for Canon:
 
Thank you for being a valued customer of Tamron products. We have learned that the AF functions of the following interchangeable lenses for Canon do not function in Live View mode when used on the EOS 5Ds and EOS 5DsR which went on sale in June 2015. We sincerely apologize to all users and potential purchasers for any inconvenience the issue may cause.
 
Firmware update service is already available as this is the same case when EOS Rebel T6s and the EOS Rebel T6i were released. Also, Model A011 with the latest firmware for panning shot treatment is compatible and functions properly with these new cameras.
 
*Please see below for the previous firmware update service announcement regarding EOS Rebel T6s and EOS Rebel T6i and the firmware update service for SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD (Model A011) for panning shot.
 
Affected models (for Canon)
 
  • SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A012)
  • SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A00)
  • SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD (Model A011)
  • SP 90mm F/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD (Model F004)
  • 28-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di VC PZD (Model A010)
  • 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD MACRO (Model B016)
For those who require firmware update service, please contact our service department.
 
Sincerely,
Tamron USA
 
Note: This overwrite service will only apply to authorized Tamron products purchased in the USA. No service will be offered to the “gray-market products”, such products bought from an unauthorized Tamron USA dealer. Please contact retailer if the original purchase was made from an unauthorized dealer.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 6/26/2015 8:16:06 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
Watch how San Francisco-based design director Bradley G. Munkowitz uses lazers, smoke, colored filters and falling crystal dust to create what will soon be the ubiquitous Windows 10 hero image.
 
For historical context, Windows XP hero image is generally regarded as one of the most viewed photographs in history. Below you can see photographer Charles O'Rear describe how he captured the familiar image.
 
Post Date: 6/26/2015 7:08:27 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, June 25, 2015
Canon EOS 5Ds
Let's make some noise with the EOS 5Ds. We already talked about one important 5Ds noise factor (high ISO noise), but the audible noise a camera makes can be quite important in quiet situations. When the photographer wishes to remain unnoticed, such as at a wedding or when photographing wildlife, a quiet shutter release is greatly appreciated. The good news is that the 5Ds performs at a noticeably lower decibel than its predecessor.
 
Following are links to MP3 files capturing "The Sounds of the Canon EOS 5Ds". Turn up the volume!
 
Canon EOS 5Ds One Shot Mode
Canon EOS 5Ds Burst Mode
Canon EOS 5Ds Slow Burst Mode
Canon EOS 5Ds Silent Mode
Canon EOS 5Ds Silent Burst Mode
Burst Comparison: 5D III, 5Ds, 7D II and 1DX (3.5 second clips of each)
 
It is not hard to figure out which cameras included in the burst comparison will garner the most attention. Notably, you will hear that the 5Ds is quieter than the 5D III with a less-sharp sound response. Designed to reduce vibration, the new mirror mechanism is also responsible for quieter performance.
 
The 5D III's silent mode was very useful and the 5Ds retains the same ability with a similar sound level.
 
More Information
 
Canon EOS 5Ds
Canon EOS 5Ds R
 
B&H has the Canon EOS 5Ds in stock and the Canon EOS 5Ds R is available for preorder.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 6/25/2015 11:38:53 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Canon EOS 5Ds
My Canon EOS 5Ds and 5Ds R cameras are here and as you expected, they are practically glued to my hands. These cameras are delivering simply amazing image quality.
 
I will have lots of additional info to share about this camera in the very near future, but once again, I kept notes as I unpacked and configured three copies of the world's highest resolution DSLR. Following are the 36 steps I take to make an out-of-the-box 5Ds / 5Ds R ready for use.
 
  1. Open the box, find the battery and charger and plug it in. If you have another charged LP-E6/LP-E6N battery available, you can continue to the battery-required steps without a wait.
  2. While the battery is charging, unpack the other items you want from the box. For me, this is primarily the camera, the eye cup, the neck strap and the Canon Solution Disk. This is also a good time to grip the camera, taking in the new-camera grippyness that is right up there with new car smell.
  3. Install Canon Solution Disk software on your computer to get support for the latest camera(s). Canon Digital Photo Pro (DPP), EOS Utility, Photostitch and Lens Registration Utility are the options I manually include in the install.
  4. Attach the neck strap.
  5. Insert the battery (after charging completes).
  6. Power the camera on.
  7. The date and time setup screen will show at startup the first time. Use the Rear Control dial and the Set button to update this information.
  8. Insert one (or two) memory card(s) (format them via the tools menu option before taking pictures).
  9. Set the camera's mode to one other than fully auto (the GreenSquare A+ mode only provides a small subset of available menu options), C1, C2 or C3 (Custom modes do not retain settings for use in other modes).
  10. Scroll through all of the menu tabs to configure the cameras as follows:
  11. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Image quality: Use top dial to set RAW to "RAW" and Rear Control dial to set JPEG to "–"
  12. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Image review: 4 sec.
  13. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Beep: Disable
  14. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Release without card: Disable/off
  15. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Lens aberration correction: All disabled (though I suggest leaving CA correction enabled for most uses – all can be applied in DPP)
  16. Shooting Menu, Tab 2: ISO Speed Settings: ISO Speed range: L(50)-H1(12800), Auto ISO Speed range: 100-6400
  17. Shooting Menu, Tab 2: Auto Lighting Optimizer: Off
  18. Shooting Menu, Tab 2: White balance: AWB-W (Auto: White priority)
  19. Shooting Menu, Tab 3: Picture Style: Neutral with Sharpness Strength set to "1" (Note: the low contrast "Neutral" picture style provides a histogram on the back of the camera that most-accurately shows me blown highlights and blocked shadows on the camera LCD. I usually change the Picture Style to "Standard" in DPP after capture.)
  20. Shooting Menu, Tab 3: Long exposure noise reduction: I usually have this option set to "Auto", but my choice varies for the situation.
  21. Shooting Menu, Tab 3: High ISO speed noise reduction: Off (noise reduction is destructive to images details – I prefer to add NR sparingly in post)
  22. Shooting Menu, Tab 4: Anti-flicker shoot: Enable
  23. Shooting Menu, Tab 5: Grid display: 3x3
  24. AF Menu, Tab 2: AI Servo 1st image priority: Focus (I want the images in focus more than I want the time-priority capture)
  25. AF Menu, Tab 2: AI Servo 2nd image priority: Focus (same reason)
  26. AF Menu, Tab 4: Orientation linked AF point: Separate AF pts: Area + pt
  27. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Highlight alert: Enable (flash portions of images that are overexposed)
  28. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Playback grid: 3x3
  29. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Histogram disp: RGB (I want to monitor all three color channels for blown or blocked pixels)
  30. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Magnification (apx): 1X
  31. Tools Menu, Tab 1: Auto rotate: On/Computer only (this provides the largest playback image size on the camera LCD)
  32. Tools Menu, Tab 2: Viewfinder display: Viewfinder level: Show, VF grid display: Enable
  33. Tools Menu, Tab 4: Custom shooting mode (C1-C3): Auto update set: Enable (see also: Configuring Custom Shooting Modes)
  34. Custom Functions, Tab 3: Custom Controls: Set: Playback; Multicontroller: Direct AF point selection
  35. Custom Functions, Tab 4: Default erase option: [Erase] selected
  36. My Menu: Add the first tab; Register the following options for Tab 1: Long exposure noise reduction, Mirror lockup, Format card, Date/Time/Zone (great for monitoring what time it is), Sensor cleaning, Anti flicker shoot
I of course make other menu and setting changes based on current shooting scenarios, but this list covers my initial camera setup process.
 
To copy this configuration would mean that you intend to shoot similar to how I shoot – including shooting in RAW-only format. While my setup works great for me, your best use of this list may be for tweaking your own setup.
 
If you can't remember your own menu setup parameters, keeping an up-to-date list such as this one is a good idea. Anytime your camera goes in for a service visit, the camera will be returned in a reset-to-factory state. Your list will insure that you do not miss an important setting when putting the camera back into service.
 
More Information
 
Canon EOS 5Ds
Canon EOS 5Ds R
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 6/25/2015 10:33:19 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Canon Logo
We have confirmed that there are counterfeit Speedlite 600EX-RT flash products in circulation in the market. It has been reported that these products are being sold through various online marketplace websites. These counterfeit products have not been designed or manufactured by Canon, but fraudulently display the Canon logo, and may also fraudulently display other Canon and third party trademarks. Furthermore, these counterfeit products have not been manufactured or tested under the safety standards established by Canon, so we are unable to make representations concerning their safe operation, and there is a possibility that using one of these counterfeit products may cause adverse affects such as generation of fire and/or smoke.
 
The safety of our consumers is our utmost concern. Unlike genuine Canon products, counterfeit products may not meet government and industry safety standards. To ensure that you’re buying genuine Canon products, we recommend purchasing from a Canon Authorized Dealer or directly from Canon. Please be advised that Canon is not responsible for any malfunction, accident, or damage related to the use of any counterfeit product.
 
It has also been confirmed that the radio transmission wireless shooting function incorporated into genuine Canon Speedlite 600EX-RT flashes is not incorporated into the counterfeit product. This missing feature will limit the performance of the counterfeit flash, as compared with a genuine Canon Speedlite 600EX-RT flash.
 
We truly appreciate your attention to this matter and thank you for being a valued Canon customer.
 
The following tips may help you to identify a counterfeit Speedlite 600EX-RT flash. Please note, however, that other counterfeits may display other, or additional, differences from genuine Canon products. As such, you should contact Canon using the contact information below if you have any questions about whether you are using a genuine Canon Speedlite 600EX-RT flash.
 
Canon Speedlite 600EX RT Counterfeit Overall View
  • The counterfeit product fraudulently displays the Canon logo and may fraudulently display other Canon and third party trademarks.

Canon Speedlite 600EX RT Counterfeit Foot Lock
  • The position to release the mounting foot lock lever is different.
  • The position to release the mounting foot lock lever on a genuine unit is towards the left (see the green arrow), and the position to release the mounting foot lock lever on a counterfeit unit is towards the center (see the red arrow).

Canon Speedlite 600EX RT Counterfeit LCD
  • The display on the Custom Function screen is different. Follow the steps in the Speedlite 600EX-RT Instruction Manual to access the Custom Function screen.

Thank you for using Canon products.
 
Customer Support Operations
Canon U.S.A., Inc
 
B&H sells genuine Canon Speedlite flashes.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 6/25/2015 9:23:44 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Samyang Optics UK Website Changing to Samyang Foods
Not long ago, the Samsung UK website was one of the better sources for obtaining information regarding Samyang Lenses. Why? As the Samyang UK site was authored by English-speaking natives, it was much easier to read (the press releases were translated very well) compared to some of the other international Samyang sites.
 
Over the past year or so, the main Samyang Optics site has gotten much better for English-speaking individuals and has been redesigned with a great look. The main site has gotten so good, in fact, that it looks as if Samyang decided to go a different direction with their UK-oriented site.
 
Just think, if Samyang had made this change around April 1, no one would have thought I was being serious in reporting this change. But truthfully, I'm just not creative enough to have come up with this.
 
Ramen, anyone?
Category: Samyang News
Post Date: 6/25/2015 9:02:49 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, June 24, 2015

 
In this video, B&H provides some hands on insights regarding the Audio-Technica System 10 Wireless Mic System.
 
This looks very similar to the RodeLink Wireless Filmmaker Kit that was released earlier this year (though the AT System 10 came out first). I've been researching audio recording options over the past few months and I've been weighing the pros and cons of this type of setup. I'm not quite sure what I'll eventually end up with, but Audio-Technica System 10 is now high on the list of possibilities. [Sean]
 
B&H carries the Audio-Technica System 10 Wireless Mic System.
Post Date: 6/24/2015 2:30:00 PM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From Nikon Europe:
 
#Nikonpresents the work of urban explorer & photographer, David de Rueda. David had an ambition: to explore abandoned places across Europe and photograph them in a way that had never been done before. Nikon supported his goal and after 44 days of exploring 9 countries he came back with incredible photographs. Stay tuned for more!
 
B&H carries the Nikon D810 DSLR camera.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 6/24/2015 1:46:16 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
ISO noise test results have been added to the Canon EOS 5Ds and 5Ds R review pages.
 
As the rule goes with today's technology, along with a higher density sensor comes increased noise levels. Design a sensor with a pixel density equal to that of current APS-C sensors and ... one should expect noise levels that are similar to those in APS-C DSLRs. Make no mistake, Canon has not marketed this camera for its clean low light/high ISO performance and that is reflected in the 5Ds' max ISO setting that is lower than what is found even in many current APS-C models. Canon initially indicated that the 5Ds' noise levels would be better than the 5D II and 7D II, but not as good as the 5D III.
 
My personal expectation was that, when compared at the pixel level, the 5Ds noise levels would be close to those of the not-long-prior released high end EOS 7D II APS-C DSLR and when the 50.6 MP image was scaled down to 5D III pixel dimensions, the 5Ds would have an advantage, producing noise levels similar to or better than the 5D Mark III.
 
As I was very anxious to see the 5Ds noise test results, this test was a near-first order of business when the cameras arrived and these test results can be found in the noise comparison tool. Note that the "Standard" results in these tests include no noise reduction. This is not a default setting, but these results show what the camera itself can do. The color blocks, having areas of solid color, make ISO noise very apparent. If you can't see a difference in noise when comparing the color blocks between cameras, you are not likely to see any difference in your images. If the difference is tiny, there are likely other camera features that will be more influential in your decision making process.
 
Getting an important comparison out of the way: the noise difference between the 5Ds and 5Ds R is indiscernible. Noise is not a decision factor for choosing between these two cameras.
 
A large number of photographers looking for the resolution offered by this camera will be capturing commercial, studio, portrait, landscape, still life, architecture and a great many other subjects that are most frequently captured at ISO 100 or 200 and those images will be very clean. A very small amount of noise can be seen at ISO 400. Noise levels basically double as full stop ISO range settings are traversed with noise becoming strong but tolerable at 3200. Though this camera's highest ISO setting is 12800 (H), the noise levels are such that ISO 12800 images can be usable for some purposes. That is something I haven't been able to say about the highest ISO settings of any DSLR in a very long time.
 
Some may be disappointed that the 5Ds only goes to 12800 while cameras such as the 7D II have much higher ISO settings available, but ... bragging right appears to be the only useful value for the 7D II's ISO 51200 setting (or ISO 25600 for that matter). I can't think of a use I have for an image with that much noise.
 
If you were one of the few that use APS-C ISO 25600 or ISO 51200, simply dial in another stop or two of brightness while post processing. The 5Ds ISO 12800 images can be brightened during post processing to achieve the same 7D II ISO 51200 equivalent with similar amounts of noise. See the "Simulated High ISO" result set in the noise comparison tool for these examples. Brighten 5Ds ISO 12800 images by three stops to get to the 5D Mark III max ISO 102400 equivalent. Then downsize the 5Ds results to the 5D III pixel dimensions and the results are similar (and equally unusable to me). I applaud Canon for designing a realistic max ISO setting into this camera.
 
After getting over the striking resolution difference between the 7D II and 5Ds, it is apparent that these two bodies have very similar amounts of noise at the pixel level with the 5Ds having a slight advantage at the highest settings. Downsize the 5Ds results to 7D II dimensions and the 5Ds has at least 1 stop of advantage.
 
When compared at native resolutions, 5Ds images are noisier than 5D III images. The differences, especially at higher ISO settings, are less than 1 stop. Down-sized to 5D III pixel dimension (using DPP, see "Standard Down-Sized to 5D III" in noise tool), 5Ds noise levels are essentially equal to full frame 5D III noise levels and even slightly better at the highest ISO settings. So, while Canon's is not promoting this camera for its low light capabilities, I see it as one of the best options available with output size being comparable.
 
Additional 5Ds and 5Ds R example sets available in the noise comparison tool include "JPG No NR" (JPG Capture, Standard Picture Style, No Noise Reduction), JPG STD NR (JPG Capture, Standard Picture Style, Standard Noise Reduction), RAW STD NR (RAW Capture, Standard Picture Style, Standard Noise Reduction) and MSNR (Multi-Shot Noise Reduction). All four of these sets utilize Canon's default USM sharpness settings that are too strong for my taste (though the increased default sharpness will make softer lenses appear sharp). Look for the bright borders to the black lines when comparing to the "Standard" results – the color blocks should not have halos around them. On the positive side, this sharpening appears better at higher ISO settings, with image details remaining sharp while noise is significantly removed.
 
I use the Neutral Picture Style in-camera with RAW capture because it applies a lower contrast tone curve to images, providing a better picture of the camera's available dynamic range on the histogram shown on the LCD. Neutral Picture Style results appear somewhat dull. There is a time for the use of the Neutral Picture Style in production, but I usually change my RAW images to the Standard PS immediately after importing them and then adjust sharpness to a lower level.
 
The three sets of with-noise reduction samples all utilize Canon's default "Standard" reduction level. The 5Ds offers three levels of in-camera noise reduction and unlimited levels are available in the various post processing options. The RAW vs. in-camera JPG noise reduction samples are not identical, but I don't see a compelling reason to use in-camera JPG noise reduction over having the ability to adjust noise reduction during post-processing. Noise reduction can noticeably eliminate noise, but the collateral damage is elimination of some subject details along with the noise. Sharpness can also be decreased. Ideal is to dial in the right amount of noise reduction for your particular image. I seldom use noise reduction in the lower ISO range.
 
The Multi-shot Noise Reduction (MSNR) is an additional in-camera option available in many of the latest EOS models including the 5Ds. MSNR merges information from multiple (four) exposures taken in a full-frame-rate burst into a reduced noise image. The concept makes a lot of sense. MSNR provides a remarkable one stop or more of noise reduction, but ... I still have not found a compelling use for this feature.
 
The downsides to Multi-Shot Noise Reduction include: MSNR is currently available only with JPG output (I would like to see this feature added to Canon's Digital Photo Pro software for RAW capture processing - perhaps as another HDR preset). Multi-Shot Noise Reduction is not so useful with moving subjects (or with a moving camera). Long exposure NR, Dust Delete Data, Multiple Exposure and HDR Mode must be set to off to enable MSNR. The 5Ds reverts back to Standard NR in Auto/Basic zone modes, during video recording, in Bulb mode and when the camera is powered off. Flash is not supported in MSNR mode. After the 4 shot burst is captured, the camera remains "busy" for a noticeable period of time while processing the merged image. So, while this feature is a nice idea, its limitations make it less useful in real-world applications. I am far more likely to use a low ISO setting with a longer exposure when shooting stationary subject from a tripod.
 
EOS 5Ds ISO settings are available in 1/3 stop settings from 100 through 6400 with extended L (50) and H (12800) settings also available.
 
Canon EOS 5Ds and 5Ds R Noise Performance Summary
 
In summary, the 5Ds and 5Ds R (equally) deliver very clean, smooth results at low ISO settings despite their incredible resolution. While these cameras are more similar to the latest APS-C models in their pixel-level high ISO noise, downsizing the ultra-high resolution images to match any other class-leading full frame, low noise-level camera shows the 5Ds to be at least an equal in performance. While the 5Ds may not take low light performance to a whole new level, low light performance is not sacrificed and this camera competes strongly with the best available in this regard.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 6/24/2015 8:30:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
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