Canon, Nikon, and Sony News for May 2019 (Page 3)

 Thursday, May 9, 2019
From Nikon:
 
Nikon D850 Firmware v.1.10
 
Changes from “C” Firmware Version 1.03 to 1.10
 
  • The camera now also supports direct Wi-Fi connections to devices running SnapBridge. For more information, see the “Addendum to the User’s Manual” in which this feature is described. Before using this feature, upgrade to the following version of the app:
    • SnapBridge version 2.5.4 or later
  • Fixed the following issue:
    • The camera sometimes had trouble focusing on subjects in the focus points at the edges of the frame.
Download: Nikon D850 Firmware v. 1.10
 


Nikon D7500 Firmware v.1.10
 
Changes from “C” Firmware Version 1.01 to 1.10
 
  • The camera now also supports direct Wi-Fi connections to devices running SnapBridge. For more information, see the “Addendum to the User’s Manual” in which this feature is described. Before using this feature, upgrade to the following version of the app:
    • SnapBridge version 2.5.4 or later
  • Fixed the following issue:
    • If the mode dial was rotated from P to U1 and then back to P, ISO sensitivity would be set to the value selected for U1.
    • Repeatedly pressing the zoom in and zoom out buttons during movie live view would cause unexpected behavior when 3840x2160; 30p was selected for Frame size/frame rate in the MOVIE SHOOTING MENU
Download: Nikon D7500 Firmware v.1.10
 


Nikon D5600 Firmware v.1.10
 
Changes from “C” Firmware Version 1.03 to 1.10
 
  • The camera now also supports direct Wi-Fi connections to devices running SnapBridge. For more information, see the “Addendum to the User’s Manual” in which this feature is described. Before using this feature, upgrade to the following version of the app:
    • SnapBridge version 2.5.4 or later
  • Fixed the following issue:
    • If the mode dial was rotated from P to U1 and then back to P, ISO sensitivity would be set to the value selected for U1.
    • Touch Fn would sometimes not be available.
Download: Nikon D5600 Firmware v.1.10
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 5/9/2019 7:21:49 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
In this video, photographer Daniel Norton goes over a traditional three point lighting setup as well as a variation on that setup.
 
Gear Used
 
Post Date: 5/9/2019 6:59:18 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, May 8, 2019
With the Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens announced and coming soon and the similarly-purposed Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM DS Lens not being slated for delivery until the second half of the year, some need to make a buy or wait decision. In his usual clear and accurate style, Canon USA's Rudy Winston has explained the differences between these two lenses.
 
What are the differences between the Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens and the Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM DS Lens?
 
Per Rudy:
 
  • Reduced light transmittance:
    The Defocus Smoothing coatings in the 85mm F1.2 L DS lens will reduce actual light transmission by up to 1.5 stops, when the lens is at its widest aperture.
  • Defocus Smoothing effect is aperture-dependent:
    The visual impact of softer-edged, out-of-focus highlights, is at its maximum when the DS lens is shot wide-open. The visual impact of Defocus Smoothing diminishes, vs. the RF 85mm F1.2 L lens, as the DS lens’ aperture is stopped-down, and essentially disappears if the lens is stopped-down several stops from wide-open.
  • Depth-of-field is rendered differently:
    At wider lens apertures where the Defocus Smoothing effect is visible, for technical reasons, depth-of-field will appear deeper in shots taken with the DS lens, vs. identical shots taken with the RF 85mm F1.2 L USM lens.
Rudy provides additional information worth reading, but click on the two sample images that are shared in the article for comparison purposes. They should open in new tabs. Then click back and forth between the two tabs while observing changes.
 
The first observation to make is that the DS lens produces much smoother blurred lights in the background and this is the key advantage of this lens. While looking at those lights, you will likely notice that the non-DS lens' sample image has larger-sized blurred lights. However, the size difference may not be related to the non-DS vs. DS designs. Next notice the sharpness of the model's shoulders in the two images. That the front shoulder is sharper in the non-DS lens image and that the reverse is also true may indicate that the non-DS lens was focused to a closer distance, causing the blurred lights to be larger on this account.
 
Portrait photographers are going to love these lenses and Rudy's "Which lens is right for you?" section should be helpful to those selecting between the two.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/8/2019 3:47:04 PM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Canon Japan has shared a pair of RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens sample images. Note the lack of color fringing in the white details and out of focus jewelry.
 
Canon USA also has a few sample pictures available. Click on the "Sample Images" link just above the "Features" section.
 
The Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens is scheduled to be available in June and Amazon USA has put a date of June 20th on their product page. I don't know if that date is accurate or a complete guess, so use your discernment in that regard.
 
The Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens is available for preorder at: B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | Wex
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/8/2019 2:38:58 PM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Thanks to a development announcement, we knew that the Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens was coming. Based on the performance of the Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens (and all of the other RF lenses), we expected the RF 85 to be a great performer. Based on the RF 85's price, announced in the press release earlier today, that expectation was raised to a new level. And now, with the MTF chart strongly supporting that expectation, it is practically guaranteed that the RF 85 is going to be an amazing lens.
 
The Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens is available for preorder at: B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | Wex
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/8/2019 10:04:54 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
From Canon USA:
 
The New L-Series Lens is Canon’s First RF Lens to Feature Blue Spectrum Refractive Optics Helping to Greatly Reduce Chromatic Aberration
 
MELVILLE, NY, May 8, 2019 – Continuing the company’s commitment to providing photographers with core focal-length lenses for the EOS R Full-Frame mirrorless camera system, Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the RF 85mm F1.2 L USM standard prime lens. The fifth lens in the RF family, the RF 85mm lens provides another vital tool for photographers using the EOS R or EOS RP cameras, in particular, those shooting portrait photography.
 
“Optics is at the core of Canon’s heritage. It is engrained in our DNA and the top priority when developing the EOS R Camera System around the RF mount and accompanying lenses,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “Canon is very enthused to now bring the lenses we shared in the RF lens development announcement, starting with the RF 85mm F1.2 L USM. We envision this product as being the quintessential workhorse lens for portrait photographers of all skill levels.”
 

The new lens features a bright f/1.2 aperture which, along with the 85mm focal length, encompasses an ideal lens for portrait photographers. 85mm is often the preferred focal length selected by photographers when shooting portraits because it provides an appropriate depth and perspective of the subject relative to the background, helping to capture high-quality imagery with beautiful and desirable bokeh. The focal length also allows for the photographer and subject to maintain optimum distance apart to support strong communication, while not being too close.
 
The most unique feature of the RF 85mm F1.2 L USM lens is Canon’s proprietary optical technology, Blue Spectrum Refractive (BR) Optics that helps to greatly reduce chromatic aberrations that could occur with large aperture lenses. The BR optical element, first introduced in the EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM, is inserted into the lens and refracts blue light between the concave and convex lenses. This enables the convergence of the entire wavelength of light to one point, resulting in higher image quality from the center to the edges of an image.
 
Additional Features of The Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Include:
 
  • Minimum focusing distance of 2.79 feet/0.85 meters
  • Customizable control ring that allows photographers to adjust exposure compensation, shutter speed, aperture or ISO
  • One Aspheric and one UD Lens, along with BR optics help to reduce chromatic aberration
  • 12-pin communication system
  • L-Series dust and weather resistant build with fluorine coating
  • Air Sphere Coating (ASC) helps minimize lens flare and ghosting
Pricing and Availability
 
The Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM lens is scheduled to be available June 2019 for an estimated retail price of $2699.00.
 
Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens Preorders: B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | Wex
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/8/2019 6:06:00 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, May 7, 2019
A whitetail deer's ears are extremely perceptive. So good is their hearing that they have the practical equivalent of eyes in the back of their heads. The buck in the foreground, with ears turned back and raised high, is essentially "watching" the buck in the background while looking the other direction.
 
The buck in the background is using his ears for another purpose, to communicate threat. While his ears are also turned back, the big difference is that they are laid low. The threatening laid-back-and-low ear position is not unique among deer and should serve as a warning to wildlife photographers if the warning is being directed toward them. Buck in rut frequently use this communication technique with other deer.
 
Another communication strategy deer and other animals use is the raising of their hair. In a moment, a buck can go from having a sleek, normal-appearing coat to appearing huge and fuzzy with every hair (thousands per square inch) standing straight out (imagine what humans could look like if we possessed that skill).
 
Always be looking for that something extra in your images and when photographing wildlife, communication is one such extra that can take an image to the next level. Another extra illustrated in this image is the incoming buck's raised front leg. This shows action.
 
This scenario pictured here unfolded quickly and capturing the action was the first priority. The image that showed the best juxtaposition of the two bucks was not as well-balanced in the frame as I wished, cutting off some of the trees on the right side. Fortunately, another image in the sequence included more of the right side of the scene and stitching the two images together allowed the full set of trees to be included, creating a natural frame.
 
There is still room to join me this fall for the "Whitetail Buck in Rut and Much More", Shenandoah National Park Instructional Photo Tour. Stay for the entire time and I'll pick you up at/near the Dulles International Airport.
 
Sun, November 10 to Wed, November 13, 2019 and/or Wed, November 13 - Sat, November 16, 2019
 
Contact me to sign up!
 
Photographers at all skill levels are also invited to join me for these tours:
 
"Whitetail Fawns and Much More", Shenandoah National Park
 
Sun, June 9 to Wed, June 12, 2019 and/or Wed, June 12 - Sat, June 15, 2019
 
Fall Landscape in Acadia National Park Instructional Photography Tour
 
Tue, Oct 15 through Sun, Oct 20, 2019
 
"Bull Elk in Rut and Much More", Rocky Mountain National Park
 
1 opening: Sun, September 15 to Sat, September 21, 2019
Filled: Sun, September 22 to Sat, September 28, 2019
Wait List or Sign Up for 2020.
 
Contact me to sign up!
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
600mm  f/4.0  1/500s
ISO 2200
8910 x 5476px
Post Date: 5/7/2019 10:29:47 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
In this video, photographer Ab Sesay explains his technique for getting maximum saturation from using gels. If you want to skip the needlessly lengthy video (not all of the meter readings taken were necessary to explain the concept or arrive at the preferred settings, but I'm sure Sekonic appreciated how many times the photographer used one of their meters), I'll cut to the chase for you – set your gelled lights to underexpose the areas they hit, and keep other light sources (such as an ungelled main light) from spilling onto that area. Voilà, instant saturation. The more underexposed the gelled light is in your image (as long as it is still perceptible), the more saturated it is.
 
And don't misunderstand me; a light meter is a very handy device for studio and on-location photography and videography work. However, in this particular instance, I question the value of metering your ungelled lights just to see how much light each gel is blocking. You can likely skip that step, attach the gels and meter them to achieve the desired underexposure (as Sesay mentions, about 1.5 stops under the main light), knowing that different gels will require different flash power levels to achieve the precise exposure you're going for.
 
B&H carries Sekonic light meters.
Post Date: 5/7/2019 7:30:25 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Launching today, B&H's Payboo card comes with a very unique cost savings benefit – it will pay you back for all state sales taxes charged on B&H purchases shipped to eligible states.
 
Need to make a large photography gear or tech purchase? Using the Payboo card will allow you to save significantly on that purchase. Shop regularly at B&H? The sales tax savings will certainly add up over time.
 
Here are a few Frequently Asked Questions about the Payboo Credit Card:
What is the B&H Payboo Credit Card?
B&H offers customers the Payboo Card credit card through Synchrony Bank with a revolving credit limit for any B&H purchases made online, in-store, or by phone.
 
How does the Payboo Card benefit really work?
When you pay for B&H purchases with the Payboo Credit Card, B&H will charge the total of merchandise plus applicable fees and taxes; but we instantly issue and apply a reward on orders made in our SuperStore or shipped to eligible states right in checkout as a form of customer payment. Then, the amount charged to the Payboo Card is net of the benefit applied.
 
Am I paying sales tax on my purchase? Do I need to submit anything in my tax filings?
B&H will collect and remit state sales tax in accordance with state sales tax laws and regulations. So, customers do pay required sales tax and do not need to keep track or file anything separately.
 
Is there any limit or cap on the total amount of Payboo Card savings?
No. B&H will issue Payboo Card Savings rewards without any upper limit.
 
Where can I use the Payboo Card?
The card may be used to pay on our websites, on our mobile app, in our NYC SuperStore, or by phone. Payboo is only available for use at B&H (i.e. it is not a Visa, MC, Amex, DC, etc)
Click Here to Sign Up for the B&H Payboo Card
 
Notes:
The tax-equivalent loyalty reward offer is not valid in Alabama, District of Columbia, Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming.
The tax-equivalent loyalty reward offer is not available on orders shipped to any jurisdiction that does not require B&H to collect and remit state and/or local sales or use tax.
See all fine print details at the bottom of this page.
Category: B&H News
Post Date: 5/7/2019 6:52:12 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, May 6, 2019
When considering the addition of a mirrorless interchangeable lens camera to the kit, one of the concerns is the grip size. When reducing the size of a camera, the grip is an easy target. However, when the grip is made too small, the camera becomes harder to use.
 
I used calipers to very precisely measure the grip height from the bottom of the camera to the top edge of the useful grip area on the front of each camera, but note that there was a tiny amount of judgment to be made in the latter determination. The depth measurement was made at the thickest part of the grip that included the finger swell area on the front. Use the EOS 5D-series DSLR camera as a baseline to compare against.
 
ModelHeightDepth
Canon EOS 5Ds R2.73"(69.3mm)2.79"(70.9mm)
Canon EOS R2.53"(64.3mm)2.65"(67.3mm)
Nikon Z 6, Nikon Z 72.33"(59.0mm)2.63"(66.7mm)
Sony a7 III, Sony a7R III, Sony a92.08"(52.8mm)2.40"(60.8mm)

My hand size falls between medium and large. The Sony grip design requires that I use a pinky-under strategy. My pinky just fits on the Nikon Z 6 and Z 7 grip and my pinky comfortably fits on the Canon EOS R grip.
 
If the native grip size is not large enough for you, add the respective battery grip. For the Canon EOS R, that grip is the Canon Battery Grip BG-E22. Though not available as I write this, the MB-N10 Multi-Power Battery Pack has been promised for the Nikon Z 6 and Z 7 cameras. Sony a7 III, a7R III, and a9 cameras are compatible with the Sony VG-C3EM vertical grip. These Sony cameras are also compatible with the Sony GP-X1EM Grip Extension. While the battery grips add size and weight to cameras having light weight and small size as advantages, the grips are easily removable, offering the best of both worlds. I have used the Canon and Sony grips and like them a lot.
 
I do not have an EOS RP at this time, but if someone sends me the measurements, I'll add them to this comparison chart. The RP's grip is remarkably nice for the tiny size of this camera, but it has a pinky-under grip height with the Canon EG-E1 Extension Grip adding room for that last finger.
 
If you were considering the purchase of one of these camera models, now is a very good time to do so. Instant rebates ranging up to $1,000 for Sony, $700 for Nikon, and $500 for Canon are currently available. Please remember to use the links on this site to make all of your purchases! Use the links in the comparison table to navigate to the camera model you are interested in.
Image quality test results have been added to the Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens page.
 
Can a lens with this extreme focal length range, even a Sigma Sports lens, produce good image quality?
 
The Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens is in stock or coming soon at B&H | Adorama | Amazon US | WEX
 
Rent the Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens from Lensrentals.
 
Please share these results with your friends!
Post Date: 5/6/2019 7:23:10 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
From the B&H YouTube Channel:
 
Photographer Jide Alakja gives us 5 quick tips to create lightroom presets for your wedding work. Tip number one focuses on the orange channel and using complimentary colors to improve the skin tone you’re trying to create. Another tip suggests using vignettes to draw the viewer’s focus to the center—or focal point—of the photograph. Check out the video for additional useful Lightroom techniques.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Post Date: 5/6/2019 6:42:22 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Saturday, May 4, 2019
The tips of elk antler tines are polished for a reason. During the rut, bull elk thrash the ground with their antlers and in addition to the tine tips becoming whiter, this practice often results in grasses and other plants hanging on the antlers. Sometimes the haystack is large enough to impede vision.
 
There is only one opening remaining for the September elk in rut photo tour. Consider joining a small group of passionate wildlife photographers pursuing these awesome animals. Photographers at all skill levels are invited to join!
 
"Bull Elk in Rut and Much More", Rocky Mountain National Park
 
  • 1 Opening: Sun, September 15 to Sat, September 21, 2019
  • Filled/Wait List: Sun, September 22 to Sat, September 28, 2019
  • Sign Up for September, 2020
Contact me to sign up!
 
Photographers at all skill levels are also invited to join me for these tours:
 
"Whitetail Fawns and Much More", Shenandoah National Park
 
Sun, June 9 to Wed, June 12, 2019 and/or Wed, June 12 - Sat, June 15, 2019
 
Fall Landscape in Acadia National Park Instructional Photography Tour
 
Tue, Oct 15 through Sun, Oct 20, 2019
 
"Whitetail Buck in Rut and Much More", Shenandoah National Park
 
Sun, November 10 to Wed, November 13, 2019 and/or Wed, November 13 - Sat, November 16, 2019
 
Contact me to sign up!
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
Post Date: 5/4/2019 10:21:25 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, May 3, 2019
When photographing a symmetrical subject, either take the time and effort to make it perfectly aligned in the frame ... or don't come close to doing so.
 
An image of a symmetrical subject that is perfectly symmetrically framed (or at least nearly so) usually looks great. An image of a symmetrical subject that appears intentionally non-symmetrically framed can also look great. It is when an image of a symmetrical subject is almost symmetrically framed that it appears you have made a mistake.
 
Some symmetrical subjects are far more forgiving than others. A tile floor is typically symmetrically unforgiving and note that any geometric distortion in a lens increases the in-camera alignment challenge. Another challenge is slight asymmetry in the subject.
 
This image appeared ideally aligned in-camera, but it still needed to be adjusted slightly in post-production to finish off that task. I thought I had the image ready to go when Sean mentioned that the monument was not quite perfectly straight. Measuring structure positions in Photoshop made it appear straight with some subject asymmetry showing at the bottom of the monument. A tile was lifted by a noticeable amount on the right side and the left side had stone showing on the outside of the perimeter drain that was not showing on the right, both creating optical illusions of asymmetry. I decided those fixes were needed and made some other adjustments (sometimes these small projects take on a life of their own). After revisiting the image a couple of times, I decided that Sean was still right and adjusted rotation slightly to move the image closer to perfection.
 
In this image, Abe Curland of B&H is carefully aligning his shot of the Empty Sky Memorial in Liberty State Park, NJ. The lines in tile flooring provide valuable assistance for finding center.
 
In light of the Should I Get the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III or EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens? article just posted, I'll mention that this image could have been equally captured with the less expensive Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens. The Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens was my choice for this trip because I was shooting from a tripod and wanted larger-sized stars to be created from the city lights during the blue hour and after dark. I was pulling a Think Tank Photo Airport Security rolling case around the city, so gear weight was not an issue.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
Post Date: 5/3/2019 9:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
As reported by Petapixel, some customers are being shown a Photography Plan pricing of $19.99 per month instead of the up-until-now-normal $9.99 per month subscription fee. The Photography Plan (which includes Adobe Photoshop CC & Lightroom CC/Classic CC) has been the same price since it was introduced in 2015, representing an excellent value to customers (not many goods and services have remained the same price over that same period of time). I think it's safe to say that Adobe will raise its Photography Plan pricing at some point, but doubling its price in one fell swoop will leave most photographers very unhappy, especially those who were uncomfortable with subscription licensing in the first place.
 
Are Photoshop CC and Lightroom CC/Classic CC worth $19.99/mo? For working professionals and those serious about photography, absolutely. However, a majority of photography hobbyists will find the increased price significantly harder to swallow, leaving them searching for non-subscription based viable alternatives, such as the free and open-source GIMP.
 
It remains to be seen whether or not Adobe follows through with the price doubling strategy, but if you'd like to lock in the $9.99/mo rate for some time, you can purchase 12-month Photography Plan subscription licenses right now to extend the current plan pricing. In fact, I purchased a 12-month license last night after reading the news, and I'm considering purchasing another one.
Post Date: 5/3/2019 8:31:58 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 and 85mm f/1.4 Lenses for Canon RF in stock with free expedited shipping.
 
Note: The Nikon Z-mount versions of the lenses are available for preorder using the links above.
Post Date: 5/3/2019 7:42:35 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Think Tank Photo:
 
SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA – Think Tank Photo announces the Stash Master 13L, a travel cube that enables you to expand the photo gear capacity of any large backpack, or increase personal gear space in the MindShift Backlight Elite 45L for multi-day excursions.
 
This padded insert is sized to fit the “Trifecta” of pro camera gear including a gripped DSLR body attached to a 70-200mm f/2.8, plus a 24-70mm f/2.8 and 16-35mm f/2.8. Highdensity velex interior and reinforced vertical dividers keep your gear secure and protected, while carry handles make it easy to transport. Made from water resistant fabrics with DWR coating, the Stash Master 13L will keep your gear protected, and is a great solution for pros and photo enthusiasts alike.
“Expanded gear capacity is always an important aspect of photography,” said Doug Murdoch, Think Tank CEO and Lead Designer. “The Stash Master 13L gives pros and photo enthusiasts alike the freedom and flexibility to design their individualized carry layouts however they like.”
 
KEY FEATURES
 
  • Padded insert allows you to use your own bag or fit more gear into compatible MindShift Gear backpacks
  • Water resistant fabric and DWR coating keeps your gear protected
  • Sized to fit pro gear including a gripped body attached to a 70–200mm f/2.8
  • High-density velex interior and reinforced vertical dividers holds up over time to keep your gear secure
  • Multiple dividers allow you to customize the layout depending on your adventure
  • Tuck away front flap with removable foam panel provides better access while in a backpack
  • Carry handles on front and top makes lifting easy
  • Side webbing loops allow you to attach a shoulder strap
WHAT FITS
 
  • Holds one gripped DSLR with lenses attached up to a 70–200mm f/2.8 plus, 2–3 standard zoom lenses and a flash.
  • Holds two ungripped DSLRs with lenses attached up to a 70–200mm f/2.8 and 1–2 standard zoom lenses.
  • Holds two gripped mirrorless bodies with lenses attached up to a 70–200mm f/2.8 plus 3–5 additional lenses.
MATERIALS
 
Exterior: For superior water resistance, all exterior fabric has a durable water-repellant coating, plus the underside of the fabric has a polyurethane coating. It also has highest quality YKK RC-Fuse zippers, 100D rip-stop nylon, nylon webbing, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
 
Interior: 200D polyester, high-density velex, high-density closed-cell foam, PE board reinforcement, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
 
PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS
 
Interior Dimensions: 11.8” W x 11.8” H x 7.1” D (30 x 30 x 18 cm)
Exterior Dimensions: 12.2” W x 12.2” H x 7.5” D (31 x 31 x 19 cm)
Total Volume: 13L
Weight: 0.9 lbs. (0.4 kg)
 
Think Tank Photo has the MindShift Gear Stash Master 13L in stock with free shipping and a free gift when you use our link for your purchase.
Post Date: 5/3/2019 7:25:39 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, May 2, 2019
An ultra-wide-angle zoom lens is one of the most used lenses in most kits and that means Canon having a high-performing 16-35mm lens in their lineup is a big deal. That we get to choose between two incredible L-class options or, better yet, include both in our kits is an even bigger deal. Either way, there is a choice to be made, either at purchase time or at select-for-use time.
 
For lens selection, image quality typically has very high importance and in this comparison, both lenses are performing very impressively with the III delivering slightly better image quality at f/2.8 than the f/4L IS does at f/4. Stopped down, I don't see image quality factoring into this decision process.
 
The significant differentiators are that the f/2.8 L III lens has a twice-as-wide max aperture, a roughly twice-as-high price tag and is lacking the image stabilization feature.
 
The wider aperture means that subject motion can be stopped in lower light levels with faster shutter speeds and/or lower ISO settings being used. A wider aperture means that a shallower depth of field is available and a stronger background blur can be created. Wide-angle focal lengths are not optimal for creating blurred backgrounds, but there is still a difference between f/2.8 and f/4 in this regard. When used at narrow apertures, wide aperture lenses will typically create larger starburst effects from bright lights than narrower max-aperture lenses. While there are many that do not care about this difference, it is a significant decision factor for some of us.
 
Make the aperture twice as wide and the lens elements and package holding them need to be scaled-up similarly. An f/2.8 lens typically has a larger size and heavier weight than an f/4 lens. In this case, the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III vs. EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens specs comparison shows the f/2.8 III weighing a modest 6 oz (175g) heavier (27.9 vs. 21.7 oz / 790 vs. 615g) and measuring a bit larger, 3.5 x 5.0" vs. 3.3 x 4.4" (88.5 x 127.5mm vs. 82.6 x 112.8mm). The larger size means that the f/2.8L III has larger filter threads — 82mm vs. 77mm.
 
The increased cost factor is directly related to the increased size of the lens elements and other parts and the aperture opening size-difference-to-price-ratio holds solid.
 
When shooting from a solid tripod, image stabilization typically has no realized benefit in this class of lens. When the tripod needs to be left behind, for convenience, for comfort, for shooting speed reasons, etc., image stabilization can quickly become far more important than a wide aperture. The f/4L IS lens' 4-stop image stabilization system significantly surpasses the 1-stop aperture difference when shooting handheld and not trying to freeze fast subject motion, giving the IS lens a great versatility advantage.
 
Making the Decision
 
If your budget does not reach to the f/2.8L III, your decision is made. Get the f/4L IS lens. It is awesome and few will regret buying it.
 
If sports action and low light events are on your photography list, the f/2.8L III lens is the right option. The same option should be selected when the maximum background blur is desired.
 
If leaving the tripod behind, the f/4L IS is usually going to be the right option. Those carrying a lens a significant amount of time, such as when backpacking, will appreciate the f/4L IS' modestly lighter weight and smaller size.
 
Those interested in photographing the night sky, a form of action photography, will definitely want the f/2.8L III lens as will those looking to create the biggest stars from point light sources, a common desire for cityscape photography during the blue hour or after dark. Otherwise, the f/4L IS is going to serve most landscape photographers perfectly.
 
Those who want the absolute best image quality should opt for the f/2.8L III.
 
Having both of these lenses is, of course, the ultimate option, but again, the decision regarding which to select for use must still be made.
 
More Information
 
Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens Review
Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens Review
 
Buy or Rent Now
 
Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens: B&H | Adorama | Amazon US | WEX | Lensrentals
 
Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens: B&H | Adorama | Amazon US | WEX | Lensrentals
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/2/2019 9:45:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
From PiXimperfect YouTube Channel:
 
PSD Files Taking Too Long to Open? Learn how to open a merged copy of you entire file in 1-2 seconds! In this tutorial, we will learn a Photoshop shortcut to read the composite data and open a flattened version of the image instantly.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Post Date: 5/2/2019 8:03:58 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has Rokinon/Samyang Lens Stations for Canon EF in stock with free expedited shipping (the Rokinon Lens Station for Sony E is available for preorder via the same links).
 
Rokinon Lens Station for Canon EF Product Highlights
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/2/2019 7:34:29 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Think Tank Photo:
 
SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA – Get deeper into the backcountry with the MindShift BackLight Elite 45L backpack from Think Tank Photo. Forty-five liters of internal volume provides ample room for a combination of photo/personal gear and dedicated laptop/tablet. External attachment points accommodate adventure equipment such as a static rope, set of axes, snowboard/skis, and of course, a tripod.
 
Weather-resistant zippers and materials protect your gear when trekking in extreme environments. And like the other BackLight backpacks, rear-panel access adds security when traveling since your camera gear is protected behind your back. Built “Mountain Tuff” for protection against the elements, the BackLight Elite 45L features YKK AquaGuard zippers and waterproof/tearproof sailcloth, robust lumbar padding, and a quick-dry back panel for increased ventilation. Elite outdoor photographer, Dan Carr, rigorously tested the pack claiming, “The Backlight Elite 45 is the rugged companion for every adventure.”
 
“We paid special attention to the needs of backcountry photographers while designing the Elite 45L,” said Doug Murdoch, Think Tank CEO and Lead Designer. “In design, fit, protection, and durability, the BackLight Elite 45L stands up to the demands of outdoor photo expeditions like no other bag we have ever released.”
 
KEY FEATURES
 
  • Storm-resistant construction with YKK AquaGuard zippers and
  • terproof/tearproof Sailcloth
  • Superior Fit: Robust lumbar padding, hip-hugging waist belt, quick-dry back
  • nel, and foam ridges for increased ventilation
  • Back and top panel access to all of your camera gear, allowing you to work out
  • your bag without getting your harness dirty or wet
  • Aluminum internal frame supports the load and keeps it in place
  • Dedicated compartments fit up to a 17” laptop and a 10” tablet
  • Meets most international and U.S. carry-on requirements*
  • Advanced Airflow: Dual-density, honeycomb mesh shoulder straps
  • Includes tripod/monopod mounting system on front or side
  • Trekking capacity! Front pockets totaling 17L carry personal gear for a day’s outing:
  • tra layers, a jacket, food, etc.
  • Hydration reservoir ready (reservoir not included)
  • 2 large water bottle pockets with cinch cord fit 32 oz. water bottles
  • Snowboard or ski carry with tuck-away, protected edge lash straps
  • Top-lid converts into a belt pack with the removable waist belt
  • Waterproof, heavy-duty Tarpaulin base
  • Seam-sealed, brown colored rain cover blends in with the environment
  • Removable camera compartment with emergency shoulder straps to avoid gate check
  • Removable waist belt for ease when traveling
  • Expandable capacity on all five sides with daisy chain, ice axe loops and additional
  • sh points
  • Compatible with the MindShift Tripod Suspension Kit, Filter Nest/Hive & Switch Case
WHAT FITS - Sample gear packs
 
  • Nikon D3S attached to 70–200mm f/2.8, SB-910 Speedlight, 105mm f/2.8 Macro,
  • gma 35mm f/1.4 ART, 50 f/1.4, Filter Nest Mini, 24–70mm f/2.8, 14–24mm f/2.8
  • Canon 1DX attached to 70–200mm f/2.8, GoPro Hero 5, DJI Mavic Pro, Mavic
  • ntroller, 24–70mm f/2.8, 16–35mm f/2.8, 90mm f/2.8 TS-E
  • Sony A7R II attached to 24–70mm f/2.8 GM, GoPro Hero 5, DJI Mavic Pro, Mavic
  • ntroller, Filter Nest Mini, A7R II attached to 16–35mm f/4
  • Holds a gripped Nikon DSLR and a 600mm f/4 FL ED VR 70–200mm f/2.8 GM, 90mm
  • 2.8 Macro
  • Canon 1DX attached to 24–70mm f/2.8, GoPro Hero 5, 85mm f/1.8, 90mm f/2.8 TS-E,
  • X attached to 16–35mm f/2.8, 70–200mm f/2.8, 2x Teleconverter
  • Nikon D3S attached to Sigma 150–600mm f/5-6.3 Sport, SB-910 Speedlight
MATERIALS
 
Exterior: For superior water resistance, all exterior fabric has a durable water-repellant coating, plus the underside of the fabric has a polyurethane coating. It also has highestquality weather-resistant YKK AquaGuard zippers, high-performance Sailcloth, 420D rip-stop nylon, 320G UltraStretch mesh, ribbed and perforated dual-density foam, 350G airmesh, honeycomb airmesh, perforated closed-cell foam, heavy-duty nylon tarpaulin, nylon webbing, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
 
Interior: 200D polyester, hexa-mesh pockets, high-density closed-cell foam, PE board reinforcement, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
 
PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS
 
Exterior Dimensions (travel mode*): 13” W x 23.5” H x 8” D (33 x 59.7 x 20.3 cm)
Camera Compartment: 11.4” W x 19.3” H x 6.8” D (29 x 49 x 17.3 cm)
Laptop Pocket: 11.2” W x 16.1” H x 1”D (28.5 x 41 x 2.5 cm)
Tablet: 0.6” W x 10.2” H x 0.6” D (27 x 26 x 1.5 cm)
Total Volume: 45L
Weight: 3.9–7.0 lbs. (1.8–3.2 kg)
 
Think Tank Photo has the BackLight Elite 45L Camera Backpack in stock with free shipping and a free gift when you use our link for your purchase.
Post Date: 5/2/2019 7:00:24 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, May 1, 2019

 
In its latest marketing video, Tamron gives its new 35-150mm F/2.8-4 Di VC OSD the moniker, "The Portrait Zoom." And in focal length regards, there's certainly something to that. The lens contains many of the most popular prime focal lengths for shooting portraiture, including 35, 50, 85, 100/105 and 135mm (and all are conveniently marked on the zoom ring). We don't know what the precise max aperture step-down for this lens is yet, but it's safe to say that the Tamron 35-150mm F/2.8-4 Di VC OSD's max aperture will lag behind popular prime lenses anywhere from 1-3 stops at comparable focal lengths. That said, the Tamron 35-150's total focal length range, moderately-wide max aperture range and price point that's significantly less than a bag full of primes should make it an intriguing option for many [especially budget] photographers' portrait needs.
 
Preorders: B&H | Adorama
Category: Tamron News
Post Date: 5/1/2019 8:02:42 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Archives
2019   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep
2018   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2017   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2016   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2015   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2014   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2013   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2012   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2011   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2010   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2009   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2008   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2007   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2006   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2005   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
Help  |  © 2019 The Digital Picture, LLC  |  Bryan CarnathanPowered By Christ!