Photo Tips and Stories (Page 2) RSS Feed for Photo Tips and Stories

 Friday, June 9, 2023

At the beginning of each year, I browse the US Air Force Thunderbirds and US Navy Blue Angels airshow schedules, adding the most-local events to my calendar. More often than not, the timing and distance prevent my attendance. Those two factors aligned optimally this year, and I was privileged to photograph the recent Pocono Raceway Airshow.

The same awesome factors of the auto racing typically featured at this venue, including speed and precision, align nicely with those of the airshow events, and the Blue Angels performing on this day never disappoint. Though lacking a runway, Pocono Raceway's massive grandstand, combined with clear air space and the sun positioned behind the show, is an ideal setup.

What is the best airshow lens? I opted for the Canon RF 100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM Lens for this event.

I also had a Canon RF 600mm F4 L IS USM Lens with me for the single jet performances. This lens provided more reach, and the f/4 aperture enabled lower ISO settings.

The size and weight of the 600 made handheld tracking of the fast planes challenging and tiring. Thus, the RF 100-500 got primary use.

While the 100-500 required a higher ISO setting with the f/7.1 aperture in use, the bright day kept the f/7.1 ISO settings reasonable. In addition, planes are not super detailed (and the sky lacks detail), allowing noise reduction to be applied without much loss of detail.

With the light levels staying rather consistent this afternoon, a fully manual exposure was selected. The exposure consistency of images captured on each pass (or many passes) made mass brightness adjustments, if needed, easy.

While there were many times when 500mm was not long enough in front of a full-frame Canon EOS R5, there were times when the formation was too close for even 100mm, as illustrated here (well, 118mm to be specific).

 
Camera and Lens Settings
118mm  f/7.1  1/2000s
ISO 640
6554 x 4371px
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Post Date: 6/9/2023 9:04:48 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, June 2, 2023

Bighorn sheep are common in Badlands National Park, but I don't see rams this big so frequently.

The key to capturing this image was observing that the ram was eating the yellow flowers. While eating, the ram's head was primarily down, not my favorite position. Positioning to capture the ram leaving one harvested patch on its way to another yielded a selection of head-up poses.

Getting the 600mm and f/4 combination down low on the flat grasslands creates a strongly blurred background.

Heatwave distortion was a problem during this capture, but shooting many images at a fast frame rate provided an adequate number of sharp results.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
600mm  f/4.0  1/1000s
ISO 640
7901 x 5270px
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Post Date: 6/2/2023 9:41:54 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, May 22, 2023

King of Wings is a crazy hoodoo rock formation west of Nageezi, New Mexico, near the Bisti Badlands, De-Na-Zin Wilderness, Valley of Dreams, and Ah-Shi-Sle-Pah Wilderness areas. Photographing this unique feature rose to the top of the to-do list, and the planning started.

The first King of Wings photography challenge occurs during online research. "King of Wings" search results are primarily related to a chicken part covered in BBQ sauce. Adding location-related keywords easily resolved that problem, and considerably more challenging obstacles remained. Getting there was one of them.

The King of Wings trailhead (a generous term) is another long-drive-from-everywhere New Mexico location. The last roads (about 17 miles of them) are rutted, and the final drive is a rough two-track. This long slab of rock hanging about 10' (3m) beyond the pillar holding it is another GPS-guided two-mile hike across a non-descript trailless desert.

For energy conservation reasons, I opted to take one camera and one lens. My choice? The Canon EOS R5 and the RF 15-35mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens.

Based on scouting, this lens's focal length range had the optimal angles of view. This lens delivers superb optical quality, and the R5 is my go-to camera for nearly everything.

King of Wings is unique enough to be photogenic at any time of the day, but the timing goal for this shoot was such that the setting sun would cast a warm light tone practically upward as it set.

With only a few minutes of the ideal light color, it was imperative that clouds not be present. However, clouds in the background would be welcomed. The weather forecast indicating a clearing sky at sunset seemed optimal, and it was go time.

The long hike back to the SUV in the dark and subsequent drive to the airport were better with the knowledge that another goal shot was on the memory card.


A larger version of this image is available here.

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Post Date: 5/22/2023 11:10:16 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, May 16, 2023

Photographing Alien Throne in the Valley of Dreams, near Bisti Badlands, De-Na-Zin Wilderness Area and Ah-Shi-Sle-Pah Wilderness Area was on my to-do list, and obviously, I made that trip happen.

You've heard it said that a photo should tell a story. I agree that telling a story is a good aspect of a photo, but storytelling is not always important, and oftentimes, the capture of an image creates a story. This image falls into that latter category.

Some images are complicated to capture, some images are complicated to edit, and some images are both. Again, this one landed solidly in the latter category.

Even beyond any travel required to get to New Mexico, getting to Valley of Dreams requires a long drive (for everyone) that ends on high-clearance two-track "roads" (and a popular mapping app does not currently provide the correct directions). Once driving capabilities are exhausted, the hike to Alien Throne is nearly two miles with, at least for the newcomers, GPS guidance over the trailless desert.

The Valley of Dreams is a dark sky location, optimal for photographing the Milky Way. Add darkness to the hike, and even most Valley of Dreams-experienced hikers need constant GPS navigation assistance as your vehicle becomes a needle in a haystack on the return hike.

Choosing to photograph the Milky Way in April means a middle-of-the-night shooting time (with, likely, no other photographers competing for your location). After photographing a sunrise, napping, scouting, and photographing sunset at Alien Throne, and resting back in the SUV for a couple of hours, we started the second hike to Alien Throne in the darkness at 1:00 AM.

Once in position, establishing the composition was the first goal, and darkness greatly increases this challenge. I brought low-level lighting for this scene, but we opted to go with natural lighting due to the myriad of hard shadows present here.

With the composition established, the Milky Way became the focus. The lens was manually focused on the stars, and the mental note for a quick return to optimal infinity focus was that this setting was immediately after the camera's distance meter changed from a number to the ∞ symbol.

I was uncertain where the Milky Way would be compositionally ideal as it rotated through the image, and there were clouds that could shut down visibility later. Thus, images were continuously captured until the Milky Way was clearly rotated beyond the optimal position.

Next, without moving the camera, the foreground was focused on. The 24mm focal length at f/1.4 does not provide adequate depth of field for this entire scene, making focus bracketing important for that goal.

The ground subjects would not be obscured by clouds, and they were not moving in relation to the camera. Thus, they could be photographed at leisure, and longer exposures created a brighter image without concern for star trails. For this image's foreground, three 30-second images were captured at three focus distances, with the duplicate images enabling some of the noise to be averaged out.

After the blending, the three foreground images were focus-stacked into a single image. Focus stacking is easy in Photoshop (& Lightroom). Open as layers in Photoshop, select all layers, select Edit > Auto-Align Layers [select Auto], choose Edit > Auto-Blend Layers [select Stack Images]. Then, the Milky Way sky image was focus-stacked into the final image.

Further processing primarily consisted of adding contrast, cooling the color tone, and darkening the foreground significantly.

It was after 4:00 AM when we packed up to start the GPS-guided route back to the car, and the sun was up by the time we arrived at the hotel. Hotel breakfast was the end of the story behind this image.

Was the reward worth the effort? Definitely. With photography, it usually is.


A larger version of this image is available here.

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Post Date: 5/16/2023 7:30:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, May 14, 2023

The Cracked Eggs (or Alien Egg Hatchery) rock formations about 2 miles into Bisti Badlands, De-Na-Zin Wilderness Area are an intriguing subject.

This scene called for the classic use of a wide-angle focal length. Move in close to render the foremost egg large while keeping nearly the entire hatchery and a significant amount of interesting background in the frame. This lens can go significantly wider, but 22mm seemed the right choice for the background details inclusion.

Selecting the camera height is typically a necessary consideration for landscape photography. In this case, a high position provided separation of the foreground cracked egg and the one behind it. This position also showed the number of cracked eggs vs. having foreground eggs obscuring them.

Scouting showed that this scene would look great at sunset, and that timing was the photographic plan implemented. As is often the case, the light was best immediately before the scene went into shadows, the optimal (warmest) light only lasted for a few minutes, and the images shot before the best light are seldom seen by anyone else.

Immediately before the eggs went into shadows, I flipped the camera to vertical orientation (Cracked Eggs at Sunset) (an L-bracket makes this change fast and holds the same alignment) to capture a variation. When the eggs went into shadows (Cracked Eggs in Sunset Shade, they were evenly illuminated, and the glowing canyon walls in the background remained attractive.


Larger versions of these images are available here.

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Post Date: 5/14/2023 8:00:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, May 5, 2023

The pink Huguenot Church is one of my favorite subjects in Charleston, SC, and this entrance is especially eye-catching.

From a distance, the depth of this doorway is deemphasized, but moving in close with an ultra-wide-angle lens reveals that attribute. This lens's angle of view also permits a foreground fence to be omitted while keeping most of the doorway in the frame.

The RF 16 was not my first choice for street photography while walking around Charleston with the Canon EOS R8 this afternoon. However, this little lens was easy to take along for just-in-case needs, and it proved worth having along.

The Canon RF 16mm F2.8 STM Lens provides outstanding utility (and fun) for its size, weight, and especially, price. As I share this sample image, the RF 16 in refurbished condition is on sale for only $179.00.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
16mm  f/4.5  1/160s
ISO 100
4000 x 6000px
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Post Date: 5/5/2023 11:52:06 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, April 27, 2023

On a trip targeting the Bisti / De-Na-Zin Wilderness Area in New Mexico, I ended up in Bears Ears National Monument, Utah.

Why? Two reasons.

First, 3 days of sand and dust storms (even stones were in the air) provided an unfavorable New Mexico greeting. Second, Bears Ears National Monument has some great photo subjects.

This image is of House on Fire in Mule Canyon, Cedar Mesa. Late in the morning, the sun reaches the red rock below this ancient Puebloan granary, creating a warm-toned light that reflects up into the massive rock overhang. That warm light color combines with lines in the rock to create the look of a raging fire over the ancient building.

Photographers chose a wide range of editing choices for this subject, some including red color tone emphasis and wild saturation. The chosen concept is typically to make the flames appear intense, and personal preference or audience preference rules (unless processing for a client).

I opted to process this image using the cloudy white balance setting, cooler than the shade option technically right for the scenario (6500k vs. 7500k), with a bit of vibrance (+30) to bring out the richness in the colors.

House on Fire affords a wide variety of compositions. To fully cover the focal length range potentially desired, I carried two awesome zoom lenses, the Sony FE 12-24mm F2.8 GM Lens and the Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM II Lens.

Primarily, the 12-24mm lens met the needs, delivering this corner-to-corner sharp image in a single shot.


A larger version of this image is available here.

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Post Date: 4/27/2023 1:16:17 PM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, March 19, 2023

This much graffiti on the walls corresponds to a sketchy environment, right? Not here.

Street legal graffiti is the draw to Graffiti Alley in Baltimore, and Graffiti Alley is a sure thing graffiti photography location (though non-family-friendly content is sometimes created).

Filling the frame with unique color is not a challenge here, but figuring out what compositions are appealing amongst the chaos is. While I was challenged, the Sony FE 20-70mm F4 G Lens provided the full range of desired focal lengths.


A larger version of this image is available here.

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Post Date: 3/19/2023 8:00:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, March 17, 2023

The grand George Peabody Library in Baltimore screams for an ultra-wide-angle lens. While many Sony wide-angle lenses would easily handle this job, the Sony FE 20-70mm F4 G Lens is the only Sony full-frame standard zoom lens that takes in angles of view this wide.

The other requirement for photographing this architectural marvel is working around the no tripod requirement. The interior is dark, so obtaining the highest image quality requires support.

When is a tripod not a tripod? On this day, the Really Right Stuff TFA-01 Ultra Pocket Pod with a BPC-16 Microball with Panning was no-tripod acceptable.

When photographing a symmetrical scene, find center. Use a perfectly centered and horizontally level camera. Or, don't. Make the composition uncentered enough to make it the uncenteredness and crookedness appear to be a clear decision, artistic instead of sloppy.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
20mm  f/8.0  8s
ISO 100
5761 x 8639px
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Post Date: 3/17/2023 8:00:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, March 16, 2023

Sometimes, 24mm is not wide enough. With a bus parked immediately behind me, the 20mm focal length was the key to this Mt. Vernon Place United Methodist Church composition.

Most full-frame general-purpose lenses start at 24mm, but the Sony FE 20-70mm F4 G Lens is a game-changer in that regard.

With the 20mm focal length affording the angle of view needed to comfortably frame the three doorways (love the red doors), positioning the camera perfectly leveled and centered in the middle door was the next task. This vertical angle was selected to split the height of the bottom visible step and comfortably contain the doorway roof peaks.


A larger version of this image is available here.

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Post Date: 3/16/2023 8:40:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, March 15, 2023

I recently shared Rock Cut in the last light. I didn't go home after the sun set, and instead tolerated high winds and very cold temperatures for a couple more hours. It seemed that the rock formations here would make a good foreground for a Milky Way photo.

Getting the rock formations to rise above the other landscape meant climbing down to the edge of the cliff, and low-level lighting was used to bring out the rock color. The foreground lighting in this Rocky Mountain National Park Milky Way image is from a pair of Simorr Vibe P96L RGB Video LED Lights on Manfrotto Befree Advanced Travel Tripods.

Once the lights and camera were set up, waiting (did I mention that it was really cold?) for the Milky Way to rotate into the desired position was the remaining task.

The Sigma 20mm F1.4 DG DN Art Lens is an outstanding Milky Way lens. The difference that f/1.4 makes in Milky Way image quality over an f/2.8 lens is dramatic.

Join me in RMNP this September. I have an opening or two for the Elk Rut in Rocky Mountain National Park Instructional Photo Tour.


A larger version of this image is available here.

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Post Date: 3/15/2023 12:00:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, March 9, 2023

When the sky is clear, focusing on what the last light of the day is hitting is often the optimal plan. Last light typically falls on high-elevation features, and Rock Cut in Rocky Mountain National Park has that qualification.

A Colorado 14er, Longs Peak, also captures the day's last light. Framing this mountain between the Rock Cut features results in what you see here.

The Sony Alpha 1 and Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM II Lens are an outstanding combination. Three manually focus bracketed images were combined for this image.

Join me in RMNP this September. I have an opening or two for the Elk Rut in Rocky Mountain National Park Instructional Photo Tour.


A larger version of this image is available here.

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Post Date: 3/9/2023 9:29:52 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Saturday, March 4, 2023

Adding close focusing capabilities to an otherwise useful focal length and max aperture combination adds versatility — and fun. The Canon RF 24mm F1.8 Macro IS STM Lens is one such lens.

Here, the RF 28 gets close to a honeybee, with a bright cloudy sky creating a high key background.

From a composition perspective, besides getting close, an overall balance was the goal for this (and most) images. The sunflower was itself worthy of being photographed, but the honeybee added another point of interest to the composition.

Bees will often work their way around the flower. Figure out their plan and make yours accordingly. While the bee was farther back on the flower, I positioned the lens for what seemed the optimal composition and timed the shot when the bee arrived.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
24mm  f/1.8  1/400s
ISO 100
8192 x 5464px
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Post Date: 3/4/2023 6:00:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, February 26, 2023

This bull was protecting a herd of cows during the rut in Rocky Mountain National Park. While he appears to be looking directly at me, he didn't care that I was there. The shot was timed as he was watching distance competitors.

One of the reasons I prefer high-resolution cameras is that their images can be cropped significantly and still have sufficient resolution for many uses. In this case, a vertical crop was created from a horizontally oriented Canon EOS R5 image. Despite that heavy cropping, the image is still 17 MP.

Join me in RMNP this September. I have a couple of openings for the Elk Rut in Rocky Mountain National Park Instructional Photo Tour.


A larger version of this image is available here.

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Post Date: 2/26/2023 7:30:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, February 16, 2023

This big bull, prancing and showing off his antlers, was heading back to his herd of cows after fending off an adversary.

Where is the best place to be in mid to late September? Rocky Mountain National Park is high on my list of answers. Elk are one of my favorite animals, and the rut behavior makes this time of year optimal for photographing them.

So, why don't you join me in RMNP this September? I have a couple of openings for the Elk Rut in Rocky Mountain National Park Instructional Photo Tour.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
600mm  f/4.0  1/800s
ISO 6400
8049 x 5676px
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Post Date: 2/16/2023 12:36:21 PM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, February 15, 2023

Always look for new camera locations while working a scene. That process at The Charleston Place's zero edge pool determined that the camera practically in the water produced my favorite image.

Seldom do water reflections let us down, and in this case, they add intrigue. The Canon EOS R5's vari-angle LCD made the precise alignment of this handheld composition possible.

General purpose focal lengths in a compact, lightweight package make the Canon RF 24-50mm F4.5-6.3 IS STM Lens a great option for travel and other portable needs. This lens's low price is a highly attractive feature, and initial image quality impressions are good.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
24mm  f/11.0  1/50s
ISO 100
8192 x 5464px
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Post Date: 2/15/2023 7:30:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, February 12, 2023

When I learned that the shooting opportunities were models in an old house, I grabbed three lenses.

The first two, the Canon RF 85mm F2 Macro IS STM Lens and RF 135mm F1.8 L IS USM Lens, are frequently associated with portrait photography and obvious choices.

My third chosen lens may not seem like an optimal indoor portrait lens, but the Canon RF 14-35mm F4 L IS USM Lens was selected to take in the old house in addition to the people — environmental portraits. The models were still, and the in-lens optical image stabilization made up for the not-so-wide f/4 aperture (and f/4 provided a nice depth of field).

All handheld images from this scene were sharp, but there was a bigger challenge.

When composing an image with straight lines running along all frame borders, a perfectly centered and leveled camera is often the best choice. Gaining that perfect alignment for this picture was a challenge.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
20mm  f/4.0  1/13s
ISO 400
4000 x 6000px
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Post Date: 2/12/2023 7:30:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, February 10, 2023

Put the Canon RF 85mm F2 Macro IS STM Lens on the EOS R50, and you have an impressive portrait kit in your hands. The images produced by that combination belie the cost, as the R50 and RF 85 F2 are priced at the bottom of their class.

Support columns often provide a great portrait background. Their subtle toning and (usually) white color do not compete for attention. In this case, the model's head was framed within one column, with two additional columns completing the backdrop.

Add a background-matching white coat and the 85 F2's background blur to make the model's hair and face grab the viewer's attention.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
85mm  f/2.8  1/500s
ISO 100
4000 x 6000px
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Post Date: 2/10/2023 7:30:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, February 9, 2023

The Canon RF 135mm F1.8 L IS USM Lens delivers jaw-dropping imagery, and with portraiture on the schedule, this lens was my first choice for testing the Canon EOS R8.

The location was the Magnolia Plantation near Charleston, SC., where the Spanish moss and its reflection provide a beautiful, non-distracting foreground and background that emphasize the bridge and model. Even at a relatively long distance, the 135mm focal length and f/1.8 aperture combination on a full-frame camera creates nice background separation, especially making the subject pop.

The R8 brings Canon's outstanding AF system and full-frame image quality to an affordable price.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
135mm  f/1.8  1/320s
ISO 100
6000 x 4000px
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Post Date: 2/9/2023 9:21:13 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Saturday, January 28, 2023

You can try searching, but there are no marmot photography workshops available. At least, I didn't find one.

Certainly, you could talk someone into providing a custom marmot photo tour, but there is a reason (or multiple reasons) why such tours are not readily available. I'll start the list. We don't value marmots and marmot photos enough to spend our time and funds chasing them.

However, these small animals are fun to hang out with, and they are easily cute enough to be photo-worthy.

I photographed these creatures in three national parks last year. This marmot was a Rocky Mountain National Park resident. However, a couple of coyotes were attempting to end that residency. Thus, survival was at the top of this wary marmot's priority list, and the high rock perch advantaged the marmot in this competition.

Marmots, and animals in general, vary on their minimum people distance. In relation to close shooting distance, experience, observation, and acclimation are the photographer's keys to getting the best wildlife images. Marmots in people-frequented areas of national parks tend to be quite tolerant of people.

However, getting too close is not good for photos or the critter being photographed — the subject departs.

When an interesting subject is discovered, photograph it for the insurance shots. Then, if the situation warrants, slowly move a bit closer, perhaps not directly toward the subject. Repeat until, or better yet, just before, the animal shows the least discomfort with your presence.

This image represents what I felt was near this marmot's minimum people distance. It is alert and wary, but his concern is not me.

The marmot presented a variety of poses, but most were looking toward the sides. Composition involves many factors, but the simple one in this scenario was that the critter should be looking into the frame. Placing it high in the frame helps convey the lookout role.

Sorry, I'm not opening a marmot-specific photography tour this year. But, I may have a couple of openings in my elk rut instructional photo tour in September.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
600mm  f/4.0  1/160s
ISO 200
8640 x 5760px
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Post Date: 1/28/2023 10:40:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
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