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 Wednesday, August 24, 2016
From Nikon:
 
August 24, 2016 - TOKYO - Nikon Corporation is pleased to announce that entries for the Nikon Photo Contest 2016-2017 will be accepted between October 17, 2016 and 1:00pm (JST) on January 27, 2017.
 
Nikon Photo Contest 2016-2017
 
The Nikon Photo Contest has been one of the world's largest global photo contests since it was first held in 1969. The objective behind the Contest is to nurture an aspirational community that supports photographers and filmmakers who wish to share important stories and influence the way people think through images.
 
The Nikon 100th Anniversary Award has been added to commemorate Nikon's celebration of its 100th anniversary in 2017. The Next Generation Award, open to those under the age of 30, has been added in response to the fact that roughly half of the entries in the previous Contest were captured or recorded by those under the age of 30. We hope that this new category will help to further extract and encourage the talent of the next generation.
 
In addition, world-renowned graphic designer and art director, Neville Brody, is to be welcomed as the Lead Judge for this Contest. With his appointment as Lead Judge, Brody also redesigned the Nikon Photo Contest logo. He had the following to say about his role as Lead Judge.
 
Comments from Neville Brody
 
"The Nikon Photo Contest is recognized globally as a key place to discover new and rising talent, searching out new insights and rich imaginative power and inspiration. As Lead Judge, I feel that it is my responsibility to continue this great tradition by selecting works that express new ideas and superior quality for introduction to the world. With both excitement and trepidation, I hope that the work performed by other judges and myself will make this a Contest that satisfies all who participate. I am also looking forward to seeing just how participants express their wonderful ideas and creativity through the works they submit."
 
Neville Brody is known for serving in the 1980s as art director for a globally influential London-based magazine, which received the overwhelming support of a younger generation at that time. He currently serves as the Dean of the School of Communication at London's Royal College of Art, a fine-arts university active in the education and cultivation of the next generation of international artists. Brody was our choice for Lead Judge because he is very influential to so many artists, including photographers, who will carry the next generation.
 
Just as with the previous Contest, all Nikon Photo Contest 2016-2017 photography and video categories will accept entries recorded with any digital device, including smart devices, and video entries with a length of 6 to 180 seconds will be accepted.
 
The theme for the Nikon 100th Anniversary Award is "Celebration". In commemoration of Nikon's 100th anniversary, we hope that entries in this category will cast a light on the many joyful scenes to be found around the world. We look forward to receiving works of "Celebration" that are appropriate for Nikon's centennial, and tell a story that can only be expressed by the entrant.
 
The theme for the Next Generation Award and The Open Award is "Future". Future refers to a time that has not yet passed. However, this makes for infinite possibilities. What sorts of futures can be described to the people of the world through images? While no one can predict the future, we look forward to entries that provide a connection to the future of the image-making culture.
 
We plan to announce the Nikon Photo Contest 2016-2017 winners in July 2017, and to hold the awards ceremony in Japan, the home of Nikon Corporation.
 
For more information including prize schedule, click here.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 8/24/2016 5:26:42 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, August 23, 2016
From Toshiba:
 
TOKYO – Toshiba Corporation (TOKYO: 6502) today announced that future generations of its FlashAir, an SD memory card supporting embedded wireless LAN communications, will implement “Eyefi Connected” features that the company has been granted the license from US-based Eyefi. Toshiba is targeting the launch of FlashAir with Eyefi Connected features within FY2016.
 
Eyefi Connected cameras offer a range of advanced features, including the ability to toggle FlashAir radio connectivity on and off and features that prevent camera shutdown during data transfers. Eyefi Connected features are available on over 300 camera models from more than 10 leading camera manufactures, including Canon, Nikon and Sony.
 
Eyefi Mobi App for iOS, Android, OS X and Windows will add support for currently shipping FlashAir Class 10 memory cards in August 2016. FlashAir customers simply have to install the Eyefi Mobi App on their device to enjoy instant transfer of their images and back-up photo data to the Eyefi cloud1.
 
B&H carries Eyefi Mobi wireless memory cards.
Posted to: Canon News,
Category: Toshiba News
Post Date: 8/23/2016 9:26:31 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Held biennially, Photokina is the world's largest photography and imaging trade show and the 2016 show is scheduled for Sep 20-25 at the Cologne International Expocentre in Cologne, Germany. Canon, Nikon and other manufacturers usually have some great new gear introductions coinciding with the Photokina show and we expect this year to be no different. We will be bringing you details of this year's new gear as soon as we are able/permitted to.
 
Important note: between a lull in new Canon gear introductions, a very large investment in a rewrite of the site's comparison tools (hopefully much faster versions of the tools are coming soon) and normal summertime slowness (due to vacations, etc.) on top of the already high costs of maintaining a content site, we need your support this year more than ever.
 
Please remember to use the links on this site to make all possible purchases (even diapers at Amazon) and especially for preorders of the new gear. It costs you no extra, you get any free goodies/incentives the manufacturers and/or retailers happen to be offering at the time and we receive the support necessary to keep this site going for you. Your support is greatly appreciated!
 
B&H Photo | Adorama | Amazon | eBay
 
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 8/23/2016 8:28:42 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Earlier this year I posted a walkthrough for an eye image I took using the Roundflash Ringflash adapter. While I liked the image, I thought a different lighting setup might work better to highlight the details of the eye (especially the iris). Over the past week I've been trying a few lighting setups and ultimately came to the conclusion that a simple, single light setup provided the best results.
 
Gear Used
 
EXIF: f/10, 1/160 sec, ISO 400
 
Thought Process and Execution
 
The biggest problem with the ring light, straight-on lighting approach was that the finer details in the iris became muted due to reflected light. This time around I decided to try a [near] profile view with the main light located slightly behind the subject.
 
The light source – a Canon 580EX in a 24" collapsible soft box – required precise positioning in order to create a column of light on the iris. The light was placed so that the subject's nose blocked light on the far side of the eye while the natural curvature of the subject's face (and eye) caused most of the left side of the image to be shadowed. I decided to use a white foam core reflector to open up the shadows on the left side just a bit. Note that the reflector is positioned far enough left so as not to create a second catchlight in the eye.
 
And while on the subject of catchlights, I chose a square soft box so that the catchlight would vaguely mimic an open window. The soft box's distance from the subject determined the size of the catchlight in the eye while also dictating soft the shadows were. If I had positioned the soft box further away, the catchlight would have been smaller and the shadows would have appeared less graduated. However, doing so would have required raising the ISO to compensate for the increased distance between the light source and the subject as I was already using full power with the soft box positioned relatively close (about 18") to the subject.
 
Using a tripod, I set the camera at the proper height to allow the subject to stand comfortably while capturing the image. At 1.0x magnification, very slight changes in distance to the subject can have a dramatic effect on focus. Even standing comfortably, the subject would sway a bit (almost imperceptibly unless looking through the viewfinder). This meant that I had to pay attention to the rhythm of the subject's movements in order to time the capture for optimal focus. If I were to shoot this again, I would have the subject sit in an arm chair with their head propped up on a fist to reduce involuntary movement.
 
When photographing an eye, it's also important to pay attention to the ambient light. If the ambient light is dim, the pupil will enlarge and the colorful iris will be reduced. A bright room will help showcase the iris in all its glory.
 
In post-processing, I increased clarity to help bring out details in the iris, increased the saturation a little and made relatively minor adjustments to brightness/contrast. The image shown was cropped moderately (from 5760 x 3840 to 4848 x 3232 pixels).
 
Click on the image atop this post for a higher resolution sample.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 8/23/2016 7:44:40 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, August 22, 2016
Getting both of these lenses is of course ideal (and very highly recommended), but what if your budget allows for only one? Which one should you get? On the surface, the Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM Lens and the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens are quite different in their specs, but with the addition of the Canon EF 2x III Extender creating a 140-400mm f/5.6 IS lens from the 70-200 whenever desired, these two options quickly become rather close in primary specs.
 
In making this decision, the first question to ask is: "How important is a wide aperture to you?" If you are shooting action in low light, especially indoors, the f/2.8 aperture is going to be very important. If you need the maximum background blur in the 70-200mm focal length range, the f/2.8 lens is the better choice. If you simply need the 70-100mm focal length range, the 70-200 is the right choice as the 100-400 can't do that.
 
While the focal length range should play strongly into the decision making process, the 2x extender evens out the playing field between these two lenses. One of the first concerns I have when adding an extender is the impact to image sharpness.
 
Overall, these lenses are both so sharp that image sharpness is not a significant differentiator over the native focal length range overlap. The 70-200 of course needs help from an extender to cover the 200-400mm comparable range. Adding a 1.4x extender to a great zoom lens will cause relatively minor impact to image sharpness, but a 2x extender generally produces a noticeable contrast and resolution impact and that is the case here. The 70-200 performs quite well with the 2x, but the difference in across-the-frame sharpness is noticeable with the 100-400 showing a moderately strong advantage in the 400mm comparison. AF performance/speed also takes a bit of a hit with this extender in place.
 
These two lenses are quite similar in size, weight and price ... until the 2x extender is added to the equation. The 2x adds 2" (50mm) to the length, 12 oz (340g) to the weight and roughly 20% to the cost.
 
Thus, if the longer focal lengths are going to see significant use, the 100-400 L II has the overall advantage including smaller size, lighter weight, lower price, better AF performance and better image quality. Applications I commonly use the 100-400 L II for include wildlife, landscapes and big-field daytime outdoor sports photography.
 
When the wider aperture is needed and/or the 70-200mm focal length range is preferred, the 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II is my preference. This lens is an excellent choice for portraits, indoor events (including weddings), indoor sports, and many more similar uses. When longer-than-200mm focal lengths are needed only infrequently, adding the 2x to the 70-200mm lens can get the job done.
 
Again, the ideal Canon kit will have both of these lenses in it, but for those that must choose between the two, there is usually a best choice.
 
B&H has the 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II Lens ($100.00 instant rebate), 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II Lens ($200.00 instant rebate) and 2x III Extender in stock (with 4% rewards).
From Datacolor:
 
Lawrenceville, NJ – August 16, 2016 – Datacolor, a global leader in color management solutions, today announced the release of Spyder5CAPTURE PRO, the next generation of its popular color calibration solutions for photographers, designers and imaging professionals. Spyder5CAPTURE PRO features all the essential products needed to manage color from image capture to post production, including SpyderLENSCAL, SpyderCHECKR, SpyderCUBE, and Spyder5ELITE.
 
  • SpyderLENSCAL allows users to calibrate camera and lens combinations, resulting in accurate auto-focus.
  • SpyderCHECKR and SpyderCUBE provide the user with reference tools to allow control of contrast, white balance and color when editing images.
  • Spyder5ELITE calibrates displays to an industry standard, ensuring that on-screen colors of images are accurate and match photo prints every time.
“We know how important color accuracy is for photographers, but we also know it can be time-consuming.” said Heath Barber, Imaging Market Manager, Datacolor. “Spyder5CAPTURE PRO reduces editing time by providing users with a fast and seamless workflow from capture to post-production by combining our leading color management tools in one convenient and cost-effective package.”
 
The new Spyder5CAPTURE PRO offers a bundled product savings of over 30 percent. For a limited time, Datacolor and participating photography resellers are offering Spyder5CAPTURE PRO at an introductory price of $269.99 if purchased by 9/30/2016. After 9/30/2016, Spyder5CAPTURE PRO will retail for $369.99.
 
B&H carries Datacolor Spyder5CAPTURE PRO.
Posted to: Canon News,
Category: Datacolor News
Post Date: 8/22/2016 5:25:06 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, August 19, 2016
One relatively common question we get is, "Should I get the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM or EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM lens? Is the 100L worth the extra cost?" And those are certainly good questions. Of course there are comparable third party options to consider, but for the purposes of this post we'll be looking at the two 100mm Canon models typically considered.
 
Both lenses feature the same focal length, the same maximum aperture, offer 1:1 macro focusing capability and feature very similar image quality. While the 100L barely edges out the non-L in sharpness at wider apertures and the non-L is better with flare, I wouldn't consider image quality to be a differentiating factor between the two lenses. However, there are a couple of key differences between the lenses that aid in differentiation.
 
Probably the biggest advantage of the EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM is its Hybrid Image Stabilization. Hybrid IS corrects for both angular and shift movements and allows for roughly 2-stops of correction at 1:1 focusing distances and up to 4-stops of correction at longer focusing distances. If you plan on using your macro lens handheld in the field, the L-series lens – with its HIS, great build quality and weather sealing – will be your best choice. The value of image stabilization for handheld macros cannot be understated; it's hugely beneficial. And considering that the 100L is only about 50% more than its non-L counterpart (in the US, without rebates), many photographers will find the pro-grade lens's benefits worth the investment. Being one of Canon's least expensive L-series lenses means that this lens is often a photographer's first introduction into Canon's premium lens lineup.
 
For those who prefer using a tripod when photographing macro subjects, and who do not need weather-sealing, the EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM provides L-series image quality at a more wallet-friendly price. I [Sean] personally opted for purchasing the EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM for my own personal use and I have rarely regretted it. However, I rarely shoot macros handheld. Instead, I typically prefer to capture macros under very controlled circumstances employing a solid support system [tripod] and strobes (whether indoors or outdoors). Under those studio or studio-like conditions, the benefits of the 100L are mitigated if not entirely moot.
 
In summary, if you plan on shooting macros handheld and/or need weather sealing, get the EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM. Otherwise, save some money and enjoy similar IQ with the EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM.
 
B&H carries the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM and EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM lenses.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 8/19/2016 8:28:39 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the B&H YouTube Channel:
 
Speedliting expert Syl Arena was one of the first photographers to test the new Canon 430EX III-RT and he came away impressed. In his presentation, Syl shares his insights and tips about the Canon 430EX III-RT and how he creates amazing shots with Canon Speedlites.
 
Note: The video above is the event's highlight reel. You can find the full video here.
 
Want more info? Check out Bryan's full review of the Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT.
 
B&H carries the Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 8/19/2016 8:07:39 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 8/19/2016 8:02:04 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
From Canon Australia:
 
LEAP is all about taking your creativity and photography further, and the only way to do that is to keep capturing images that are unlike anything you’ve shot before.
 
So for the month of September, we’re going to give you as much inspiration as you can handle. With a new brief every day, the last thing you’ll need to ask is “what should I shoot”? #taketheleap
 
Learn more at: https://www.canon.com.au/leap
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 8/19/2016 7:30:30 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom YouTube Channel:
 
Lightroom tips and tricks in 60 seconds or less from longtime Lightroom team member Benjamin Warde.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 8/19/2016 4:42:30 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, August 18, 2016
I have long admired images of Lake Moraine in The Valley of the Ten Peaks, Banff National Park (Alberta, Canada), especially those taken from the Rockpile. While huge numbers of great images have been captured here, none of them were captured by me. That is, none until recently.
 
The Rockpile (ascended via the Rockpile Trail) is a foreground-rich location overlooking an amazing turquoise glacier-fed lake that, when the wind is not blowing, reflects the close, steep, craggy, with-character mountains beyond it. I was blessed to spend 3 very early mornings at this location (and would return in a heartbeat). One quickly forgets the 3:00-4:15 AM alarms (followed by 11:30 PM bedtimes) when reviewing Moraine Lake images.
 
For this composition, I moved in close to a carefully-selected large rock. This rock, with plenty of leading lines, appears to fit into the edge of the mountain reflections like a puzzle piece, with even the notches appearing to align with reflected peaks. With the large mountain weighing heavily on the top left of the image, the large foreground rock is positioned proportionally higher on the right to, along with the shaded trees, aid in the overall image balance. Required for this perspective, and not visible in this image, are the tripod feet (and me) precariously positioned on the top edge of several different rocks.
 
With the mountain peaks being directly hit with sunlight and the dark evergreens being in deep shade, the dynamic range in this scene was extreme. Thus, I was shooting bracketed exposures. A camera's built-in HDR feature is a good way to capture bracketed exposures, but ... I didn't want the in-camera-generated JPG image and didn't want to wait for that composited image to be created.
 
My favorite method of shooting bracketed exposures is via the camera's AEB (Auto Exposure Bracketing) feature. Simply select the number of bracketed images desired and the desired exposure difference between them. Each image captured in succession, up to the selected number of bracketed frames, will have a different exposure (ideally for landscapes, the shutter speed is varied), insuring that all parts of the scene are adequately exposed in at least one of the frames.
 
To speed up the capture, select and use the camera's high frame rate (burst) mode. When the sun is rising, speed matters for HDR captures (this is a manual HDR image). The line between sun and shade moves quickly and ... that line becomes hard to composite if time lapses between captures. With AEB selected, a high speed burst will stop after the selected number of AEB frames.
 
I usually have MLU (Mirror Lockup) enabled when photographing landscapes, avoiding any possible vibration caused by the mirror raising. However, using MLU adds a short, but undesired, delay between the frames captured in an AEB burst. There is a better way: Live View is another method of achieving MLU. By using a remote release with Live View and high frame rate (burst) mode selected, one press of the remote shutter release (pressing and locking the release button down for long exposure brackets) captures the set number of frames in very fast succession (without the mirror moving).
 
Depending on the Lake Moraine scene and scenario, I was shooting 5 or 7 frames varied by 2/3 or 1 stop. From most sets, I deleted all except 3 or 4 images with the exposure variations needed remaining available. This image was created from three exposures.
 
Due to packing restrictions, I nearly left the Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM Lens at home. Upon arriving at Moraine Lake, I was SOOO thankful that I had it with me. Aside from using the Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens on a second camera and tripod setup some of the time, the 11-24 was the only lens I needed at this location. And, it performed extremely well as did the Canon EOS 5Ds R camera I used behind it.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image. If you find these tips useful, please share them in your circle of friends!
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 8/18/2016 9:12:43 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
From the Canon Professional Network:
Photographer, conservationist, activist and Canon Master Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols, bowed out from National Geographic in suitably impressive style this year. His final photo essay – a grand finale involving teamwork, logistical hurdles and the occasional stray bear – was perhaps his biggest career challenge yet, as he reveals to CPN Editor David Corfield...
See the entire article on the Canon Professional Network.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 8/18/2016 5:16:48 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, August 17, 2016
Santa Rosa, Calif. – A revolution in backpack design when it first released, Think Tank’s Shape Shifter expanded and contracted to hold gripped camera bodies and a laptop. In response to input from professional photographers, Think Tank has released the Shape Shifter in three new configurations. The Shape Shifter 15 V2.0 is designed to hold a 15” laptop and the Shape Shifter 17 is designed to hold a 17” laptop. The Naked Shape Shifter allows photographers to attach Skin Pouches or Lens Changers inside to create a totally customized modular backpack.
 
“While traveling or on location, the Shape Shifter V2.0 lets photographers adjust their backpack to fit their workflow,” said Doug Murdoch, Think Tank’s CEO and lead designer. “The Shape Shifters compress to three inches in depth when gear is removed, allowing photographers to have their gear at the ready while maintaining a slimmer profile when maneuvering through crowds.”
 
Key Features
 
Shape Shifter 15 & 17 V2.0
 
  • A great travel bag with extra space to fit a jacket, food, or additional gear
  • Tripod attachment on front of bag keeps tripod weight centered and allows access to gear without detaching the tripod
  • Easily accessible, plush pocket fits smartphones with displays up to 5.5”
  • Roller handle pass-through sleeve to attach to rolling luggage
  • Detachable water bottle pouch
  • Pro Speed Belt or Thin Skin Belt (sold separately) can be attached
  • Contoured shoulder harness with air channel for all body types
  • YKK RC-Fuse zippers with lockable sliders (lock not included)
  • Upper front pocket with organizer for accessories
  • Lower front pocket with zippered pocket for accessories
  • Removable waist belt
  • Shoulder harness pockets, D-Rings, and sternum strap
  • Seam-sealed rain cover included
Gear Capacity
 
Shape Shifter 15 V2.0 Gear Capacity
 
  • Holds a 15” laptop, tablet up to a 12” or 13”, plus one DSLR (gripped or un-gripped) and three lenses (detached) and personal items
Shape Shifter 17 V2.0 Gear Capacity
 
  • Holds a 17” laptop, tablet up to a 12” or 13”, plus one to two DSLRs (gripped or un-gripped) and three to four lenses (detached) and personal items
Naked Shape Shifter 17 V2.0 Gear Capacity
 
  • Holds a 17” laptop, tablet up to a 12” or 13”, plus four to seven modular pouches or lens changers and personal items
Materials
 
Exterior: For superior water-resistance, all exterior fabric has a durable water-repellant (DWR) coating, plus the underside of the fabric has a polyurethane coating. The bag also has 600D twill, YKK RC zippers, 320g dry-flow airmesh, nylon webbing, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
 
Interior: Removable closed-cell foam dividers, polyurethane backed liner and dividers, 200D polyester, laminated non-woven backed nylex liner, 2x polyurethane coated nylon 190T seam-sealed taffeta rain cover, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
 
Specifications
 
Shape Shifter 15 V2.0
 
  • Exterior Dimensions When Expanded: 18.9” H x 12” W x 7” D” (48 x 30.5 x 18 cm)
  • Exterior Dimensions When Compressed: 18.9” H x 12” W x 3” D (48 x 30.5 x 8 cm)
  • Laptop Compartment Dimensions: 16.8” H x 11.4” W x 1.5” D (42.7 x 29 x 4 cm)
  • Tablet Compartment: 9.4” W x 12.2” H x 0.6” D (24 x 31 x 1.5 cm)
  • Smart Phone/Glasses Pocket: 6.7” W x 4.5” H x 1.6” D (17 x 11.5 x 2 cm)
  • Weight (with all accessories): 4.3 lbs. (2 kg)
Shape Shifter 17 V2.0
 
  • Exterior Dimensions When Expanded: 20” H x 12.5” W x 7” D” (51 x 32 x 18 cm)
  • Exterior Dimensions When Compressed: 20” H x 12.5 W” x 3” D (51 x 32 x 8 cm)
  • Laptop Compartment Dimensions: 19” H x 12” W x 1.5” D (48 x 30.5 x 4 cm)
  • Tablet Compartment: 10.2” W x 12.2” H x 0.6” D (26 x 31 x 1.5 cm)
  • Smart Phone/Glasses Pocket: 7.1” W x 4.7” H x 1.6” D (18 x 12 x 2 cm)
  • Weight (with all accessories): 4.6 lbs. (2.1kg)
Naked Shape Shifter 17 V2.0
 
  • Exterior Dimensions When Expanded: 20” H x 12.5” W x 7” D” (51 x 32 x 18 cm)
  • Exterior Dimensions When Compressed: 20” H x 12.5 W” x 3” D (51 x 32 x 8 cm)
  • Laptop Compartment Dimensions: 19” H x 12” W x 1.5” D (48 x 30.5 x 4 cm)
  • Tablet Compartment: 10.2” W x 12.2” H x 0.6” D (26 x 31 x 1.5 cm)
  • Smart Phone/Glasses Pocket: 7.1” W x 4.7” H x 1.6” D (18 x 12 x 2 cm)
  • Weight (with all accessories): 3.8 lbs. (1.7 kg)
Think Tank Photo has the newly announced bags in stock.
 
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 8/17/2016 2:43:17 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Image quality results from the Nikon D810 have been added to the Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6E AF-S VR Lens page.
 
This lens has rapidly become a very popular one with wildlife and sports being its most frequent subjects.
 
The Nikon 200-500mm VR vs. 80-400mm VR II lens comparison is the first I wanted to see.
 
B&H has the Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6E AF-S VR Lens in stock with a 4% reward.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 8/17/2016 8:59:21 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
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