Sony News (Page 24) RSS Feed for Sony News

 Friday, April 22, 2022

Just posted: Cartoni L507 Carbon Fiber 2-Stage SDS Smart Stop Tripod Review.

This is an impressively rigid tripod.

Order the Cartoni L507 Carbon Fiber 2-Stage SDS Smart Stop Tripod from B&H.

Please share!

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/22/2022 8:17:08 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, April 21, 2022

Just posted: Cartoni Focus 10 Fluid Video Head Review.

This head costs substantially more than the recently reviewed Manfrotto 608 Nitrotech Fluid Video Head, but the Cartoni's fluid motion is better.

This head in the with-tripod kits is on sale at B&H – save $308.00 - $500.00.

Order the Cartoni Focus 10 Fluid Video Head from B&H | Adorama

Please share!

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/21/2022 8:11:15 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan

From Sony Japan (translated):

Dear customers,

Notice and apology for postponement of release of "FE PZ 16-35mm F4 G (SELP1635G)" lens for digital single-lens camera a E mount

Thank you for your continued patronage of Sony products.

At the time of the press announcement on March 22, 2022 (Tuesday), the release date was set to "April 28, 2022 (Thursday)". Digital single-lens camera a E mount lens "FE PZ 16-35mm" Regarding "F4 G", we have decided to postpone the release due to the impact of global distribution delays. The new release date is scheduled for the summer of 2022, but we will announce it as soon as it is confirmed.

We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience caused to customers who are looking forward to the release as it is just before the release. We will do our utmost to deliver the product as soon as possible, and we appreciate your understanding.

[Target product]

Digital single-lens camera a E mount lens "FE PZ 16-35mm F4 G"

[Release date]

At the time of announcement on March 22, 2022 (Tuesday): Released on April 28, 2022 (Thursday) – Scheduled to be released in the summer of 2022

[Acceptance of product orders]

After this announcement, we have decided to suspend the acceptance of orders from our distributors and the acceptance of orders from customers at the Sony store.

* The release date and resumption of order acceptance will be announced on the product information page as soon as it is confirmed.

B&H is indicating June 24th is the estimated ship date.

Order the Sony FE PZ 16-35mm F4 G Lens from B&H | Adorama | Amazon | WEX

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Posted to: Sony News   Category: Sony Announcements
Post Date: 4/21/2022 7:42:06 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, April 19, 2022

Overall, Canon and Sony offer outstanding camera and lens line-ups. It is hard to go wrong with either choice, and with no unanimous winner declared, neither Canon nor Sony will be referencing this article. However, making Canon or Sony happy is not my job — advising you is — and advantages exist between the brands.

While my kit is primarily based on Canon gear, I maintain a full complement of Sony cameras and lenses to use during evaluations. Having a solid basis from both brands permits a best-of-breed approach.

Aside from a Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III utilized to capture the site's standard lens product images in the studio, the kit is all mirrorless (I know, I should sell that last camera and process R5 images to the 1Ds III pixel dimensions). Most of the best cameras and lenses are mirrorless models; those starting out should opt for a mirrorless kit, and those interested in bettering their kits should begin the migration to mirrorless.

The Canon side of the kit foundation is built on a pair of EOS R5 bodies. The R5 is an outstanding performer, featuring general-purpose utility, outstanding AF performance, and excellent image quality, including high resolution.

A Sony Alpha 1 and a Sony Alpha 7R IV represent sony in the kit. The a1 is Sony's flagship model, featuring up to 30 fps continuous shooting with no viewfinder blackout, 50 MP resolution, and best-available specs and features throughout. The a7R IV's only advantage over the a1 is higher resolution. It would only take a moment of weakness to upgrade the a7R IV to a second a1.

Listing the cameras was easy, and most often, the which camera decision is answered by the lens needed.

Let's look at the lenses, starting with the zoom lenses and following with the prime lens options. The sort within those two categories will be the widest focal length and then the widest aperture.

Sony FE 12-24mm F2.8 GM Lens

Although it does not go to 11mm, this phenomenal zoom lens is smaller and lighter, has a 2x wider aperture, is at least as sharp wide-open as the Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM Lens, and has the same price. That Canon lens is another great option.

I primarily use this lens for landscapes, nightscapes, and interior architecture. Note that the Sony cannot utilize front filters, a detraction for certain needs, primarily those requiring a circular polarizer filter. The Canon lens has the same problem; however, the Drop-In Canon Mount Adapter adds full filter capabilities to this lens.

Canon RF 15-35mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens
Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM Lens

The RF 15-35 is my go-to landscape lens, and it works well for other needs, including capturing the big view at events, etc. Because this focal length range is so important to me, I also have the most equivalent lens on the Sony side, the Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM Lens. If a Sony camera is under evaluation, I'll take the Sony option without hesitation.

Canon RF 24-70mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens
Canon RF 24-105mm F4 L IS USM Lens
Canon RF 28-70mm F2 L USM Lens

The general-purpose focal length range tends to get a lot of use, and there are currently three superb-performing options in the kit. Initially, only the RF 24-70mm F2.8 had membership, and the results from this lens never disappoint. However, a wider aperture or lighter, more compact option was often needed.

The RF 28-70 F2 had been on the want list since it first arrived, but I waited long enough to ensure the high cost was justified. As it turns out, I waited too long, and this lens was still back ordered when a large indoor music festival assignment hit the calendar, providing the incentive to order. Unfortunately, the lens arrived about a month after the concert. Still, other needs for the f/2 lens are steadily arriving, especially the event coverage it is perfectly suited for.

While the RF 24-70 F2.8 is not a large or heavy lens, a modestly lighter option can make a big difference when hiking long distances, and the RF 24-105mm F4 recently joined the kit to facilitate some hiking needs later this year.

A phenomenal general-purpose zoom lens is arguably Sony's biggest opportunity.

Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens
Canon RF 70-200mm F4 L IS USM Lens

My uses for the 70-200mm focal length range include portraits, events, landscapes, and product images. Until recently, the relatively compact and lightweight F2.8 lens was the kit's solo 70-200mm option, but some distance hiking needs justified the F4 variant's entry into the kit.

The Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 GM OSS II Lens is an outstanding option for those with a sony kit, and this lens addition would help round out the Sony kit shared here.

Canon RF 100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM Lens
Sony FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS Lens

The RF 100-500 goes almost everywhere with me. This lens is an outstanding choice for landscapes, wildlife, portraits, daytime field sports, and more.

The FE lens fills this important role when working with a Sony camera.

Those with Sony-based kits should also consider the Sony FE 200-600mm F5.6-6.3 G OSS Lens. This lens shifts the focal length range to the long direction, which noticeably increases the size and weight of the lens. Because I most often have a 600mm f/4 lens complementing the long telephoto zoom, I opted for the more compact and wider-angle lens option.

Now we look at the primes, starting with a combined discussion of the widest three lenses.

Sony FE 14mm F1.8 GM Lens
Sony FE 20mm F1.8 G Lens
Sony FE 24mm F1.4 GM Lens

These three lenses will outperform all others matching their focal length, and the ultra-wide apertures make them the ultimate astrophotography lenses. These three lenses are in the pack if I'm photographing the night sky.

Sony FE 35mm F1.4 GM Lens

A 35mm prime lens most often joins the pack when portraits are scheduled. The strong background blur and low-light capabilities of the f/1.4 aperture are extremely attractive features, with the 35mm angle of view facilitating a great perspective for full-body portraits.

Canon's EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM is an outstanding lens, both optically and physically. However, the Sony lens is smaller, lighter, and less expensive. I purchased the Sony lens to review and kept it.

Canon RF 50mm F1.2 L USM Lens

When this lens arrived in the Canon USA refurbished inventory, I couldn't resist adding it to the kit. Reviewing the RF 50mm F1.2 revealed it the incredible-performing 50mm lens we had long waited for.

The focal length and aperture make the RF 50mm F1.2 an ideal portraiture and event lens.

Later, Sony introduced the FE 50mm F1.2 GM Lens. It is also an outstanding choice, slightly smaller and less expensive. In this decision, select the lens that matches your camera.

Especially with the RF 85mm F1.2 and RF 28-70 later joining the kit, my 50mm prime lenses do not see much use. Thus, I don't own models from both brands, and the RF 50mm lens is at the top of the consideration to sell list.

Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM Lens

This lens joined the most wanted list immediately upon providing the image quality test results, where it showed a stunning improvement over its EF predecessor. This lens is so optically high-performing that it is currently used for image quality testing of Canon EOS R-series cameras.

If portrait photography is on your list, the RF 85mm F1.2 lens is an outstanding choice, one that makes low light a non-issue.

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro Lens

The only non-mirrorless lens in this list, the adapted EF 100mm L macro is an outstanding performer. I may upgrade to the Canon RF 100mm F2.8 L Macro IS USM Lens someday, but I'm not yet over the RF lens's focus shift issue.

Sony FE 135mm F1.8 GM Lens

Similar to the RF 85 F1.2 to the Canon system is the FE 135mm F1.8 to the Sony system. The 135mm focal length is superb for portraits (and products), and the extremely high optical quality is the reason this lens is used for Sony Alpha camera image quality testing.

Canon RF 400mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens

Periodically, I decide that I could get along without a 400mm f/2.8 lens in the kit. Then life happens, and I realize how important this lens is to the needs coming in. A 400mm f/2.8 lens is used primarily for sports and wildlife photography, but it gets called upon for portraits since it is already in the kit. This lens delivers differentiating results in all its uses, with the background blur strength surpassing nearly all other options.

Sony-based kits should opt for the also-superb FE 400mm F2.8 GM OSS Lens. I like the Canon option very slightly better, with better image stabilization performance being the biggest differentiator.

Canon RF 600mm F4 L IS USM Lens
Sony FE 600mm F4 GM OSS Lens

Wildlife and sports are among my primary photographic pursuits, the 600mm f/4 is the best option for those needs, and this option for both brands is covered in the kit.

The Canon lens's image stabilization system is better, but I'll pick the Sony option for a sharpness advantage if extenders/teleconverters are needed.

Canon RF 1.4x Extender
Canon RF 2x Extender
Sony FE 1.4x Teleconverter
Sony FE 2x Teleconverter

I like carrying and using the RF 1.4 with the RF 400 F2.8, and I like using the FE 2x with the FE 600 F4 when photographing the sun and moon. Otherwise, getting closer is usually better than using extenders, and in this kit, extenders and teleconverters are most frequently used for lens image quality testing.

Which lens will be added to the kit next? It probably has not been announced yet.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/19/2022 10:30:29 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, April 18, 2022

Most often, a wildlife silhouette opportunity comes unexpectantly and is fleeting.

Because the sky is typically very bright relative to the subject, the camera's meter usually selects silhouette exposure settings that lead to underexposed images, and correcting the underexposed images during post-processing yields increased noise.

To quickly acquire the right camera settings this opportunity, rules are ideal. For example, with a blue sky in the background, instruct the camera to create exposures X number of stops higher than it thinks is necessary.

Unfortunately, too many rules are needed to accommodate all scenarios. The primary reason that auto exposure + EV rules do not work is that the percentage of the frame filled with the subject and foreground changes dramatically, possibly during the same opportunity if varying exposures with a zoom lens. Also affecting the exposure rule is the sky color, ranging from bright white to deep blue or even the darkness of storm clouds.

While spot metering on the focus point can result in a more stable exposure basis for rules to work from, even animal color varies. For example, black bears are considerably darker than mule deer.

Mirrorless cameras with electronic viewfinders programmed to show the actual image brightness make establishing the ideal silhouette exposure settings considerably faster and easier than doing the same with a DSLR. While I often have the EVF histogram turned off due to interference with my brain's compositional abilities, that tool clearly shows the selected exposure, especially the bright side's available dynamic range. Even without the histogram enabled, the brightness can be discerned by looking at the brightest areas on the EVF.

What is the ideal silhouette exposure? That answer depends on the final look desired. If the animal and foreground are to be pure black, expose the sky to the preferred brightness. If a high key look is desired, expose for a normal animal brightness, letting the sky become blown — pure white and blinking on the LCD.

To gain the most post-processing latitude or if you don't want to decide what the final image should look like while frantically trying to capture the momentary opportunity, use the expose to the right strategy. Create an exposure that pushes the histogram graph lines to the right edge of the chart. There will likely be some small areas of the image showing over-exposed blinkies during image review, but not large areas of blinkies indicating loss of detail. The goal is to retain detail in the highlights while capturing as much detail as possible in the shadows.

If photographing landscape, an HDR technique would be implemented for this scenario. Unfortunately, animals tend to move before the multiple exposures can be recorded. If your animal is motionless and your camera is locked down on a tripod, bracketing exposures is a great option.

The expose to the right option was chosen for this bull moose image capture. The sky is bright but still blue. Using Photoshop, the moose was selected and brightened slightly.

The Canon EOS R5 and RF 100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM Lens get the credits for this capture. This combination is perfect for many wildlife photography pursuits.


A larger version of this image is available here.

 
Camera and Lens Settings
270mm  f/5.6  1/200s
ISO 800
8192 x 5464px
Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/18/2022 10:21:08 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, April 13, 2022

Sony astrophotography lens recommendations are now available on the Sony Lens Recommendations page.

While creating the Sony list was easy, the Canon line-up has more room for improvement. New to the Best Canon Lenses page:

Best Canon Astrophotography Lens (Mirrorless)
Best Canon Astrophotography Lens (DSLR)

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/13/2022 9:32:15 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Just posted: Sony a9 II Review page.

Order the Sony a9 II from B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | WEX

Rent the Sony a9 II from Lensrentals.

Please share!

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Posted to: Sony News   Category: Camera Gear Review News
Post Date: 4/12/2022 9:01:38 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, April 11, 2022

There is a Sony Alpha 9 II in my hands, and it is time to set up this camera for use. Following are the 36 steps taken to prepare an out-of-the-box a9 II for use.

  1. Charge the battery
  2. Record serial number, and add camera to insurance policy
  3. If desired, download and install Capture One (for Sony) and/or Sony Imaging Edge (unless your current favorite RAW image processing software supports this camera)
  4. Insert charged battery, and power on the camera
  5. Set the language, time zone, date, time, timeformat
  6. Insert memory card(s)
  7. Select M mode 1, press the "MENU" button, and configure the camera as follows:
  8. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 1: File Format: RAW, RAW File Type: Lossless Comp (full image quality, reduced file size, ensure your software supports this format)
  9. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 1: RAW File Type: Uncompressed (full image quality)
  10. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 1: JPG File Type: Extra Fine (though I seldom shoot in JPG format)
  11. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 2: Lens Compensation: Shading, Chromatic Aberration, and Distortion Comp: All Off (I use the RAW processing software to enable desired lens compensation, with CA correction frequently selected)
  12. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 3: Bracket Settings: Bracket order: ->0>+ (considerably enhances image selection for HDR processing)
  13. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 4: Focus Area: Flexible Spot S (this selection frequently changes to match the needs of a shoot)
  14. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 5: Priority Set in AF-S: AF
  15. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 5: Priority Set in AF-C: AF
  16. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 5: Switch V/H AF Area: AF Point Only
  17. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 6: Face/Eye AF: Face/Eye Frame Disp: On
  18. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 9: Spot Metering Point: Focus Point Link
  19. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 12: Creative Style: NT (Neutral), Sharpness = 1 (the Neutral setting provides a lower contrast histogram. I usually process with the Natural creative style in Capture One)
  20. Shooting Menu 1, Tab 13: Peaking Setting: On
  21. Shooting Menu 2, Tab 5: Release w/o Lens: Disable
  22. Shooting Menu 2, Tab 5: Release w/o Card: Disable (why is this not the default?)
  23. Shooting Menu 2, Tab 7: Grid Line: Rule of Thirds (aids in composition)
  24. Shooting Menu 2, Tab 7: DISP Button: Monitor: Uncheck For viewfinder, press [enter]
  25. Shooting Menu 2, Tab 9: Dial Setup: TV/Av (I adjust the shutter speed more frequently and urgently than the aperture, and the front dial is easier to access quickly)
  26. Shooting Menu 2, Tab 11: Audio signals: Off (how to turn off the loud and usually-annoying AF beep sound)
  27. Network Menu, Tab 2: Airplane Mode: On
  28. Playback Menu, Tab 4: Display Rotation: Off (image fills LCD)
  29. Setup Menu, Tab 1: Delete confirm.: "Delete" first
  30. Setup Menu, Tab 2: Touch Operations: On
  31. Setup Menu, Tab 2: Touch Panel/Pad: Touch Panel+Pad
  32. Setup Menu, Tab 2: Touch Pad Settings: Touch Position Mode: Relative Position, Operation Area: Right 1/2 (avoids nose touches)
  33. Setup Menu, Tab 5: Copyright Info: Write Copyright Info: On, Set Photographer: [your name], Set Copyright: [as desired], Write Serial Number: On (note: entering this information without a touchscreen may be a painful process)
  34. Setup Menu, Tab 5: Format (ensure that there are no important files on the card(s) prior to formatting)
  35. My Menu: Format Steady Shot Anti-flicker Set. Flash Comp. Face/Eye Subject, Bracket Settings
  36. With a lens mounted and a subject in focus, adjust the viewfinder diopter until the scene is sharp

I make additional menu and other setting changes based on current shooting scenarios, but this list covers my initial camera setup process.

To copy this configuration means you intend to shoot as I do - including in RAW-only format. While this setup works great for me, you should adjust the setup to your needs.

If you can't remember your menu setup parameters, keeping an up-to-date list such as this one is a great idea. Anytime the camera is set to the factory state, such as when being serviced or when acquiring an additional camera, you will be ready to create your setup quickly, while ensuring that an important setting is not omitted. If you purchase another same or similar camera, setup will be fast and identical. Consider saving the camera settings to a card (Setup/Tools menu, tab 7, Save/Load Settings on card) for an easy restore.

More Information

Sony Alpha 9 II

Order the Sony Alpha 9 II at B&H | Adorama | Amazon | WEX.

Rent the Sony Alpha 9 II from Lensrentals.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/11/2022 1:51:00 PM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, April 10, 2022

The remoteness of the beautiful Ibex Dunes in Death Valley National Park is a big advantage and a big drawback.

The advantage part is that few people make the effort required to get there, and the Ibex dune field is often untracked.

The drawback is that these dunes are located near ... well, nothing. The drive from Furnace Creek took nearly two hours, with very few services encountered on the way, and the last 10 miles are narrow dirt and sand roads that require differing vehicle classes depending on the current conditions (including at an intermittent stream crossing).

The adventure does not stop upon arrival. The dunes are over a mile from the road, but they are massive and easily visible from the road (a generous term for it by this point — more like a trail), and the hike to the dunes is not difficult. In contrast to the size of the dunes, the vehicle is tiny and may not be visible from the dunes. A small angular mistake on the way out could mean a significantly longer walk and perhaps a night in the desert.

That adventure aspect was avoided with a GPS pin, an old-school compass reading, and a feature on the mountain opposite the dunes noted.

On this afternoon, a solitary set of tracks led through the low area between the untouched northern and southern dune fields. After photographing my way around the dunes, I settled into the selected sunset location to catch the day's last rays.

As I shared in the last dune image, the Canon RF 24-70mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens on a Canon EOS R5 proved the optimal choice in the Death Valley National Park dunes. While focal lengths outside this range had compositional opportunities, the 24-70mm angles of view enabled emphasis on the close subjects while keeping the background details relatively large in the frame.

The R5's focus bracketing feature made complete depth of field easily obtained for every image. Four f/11 images were required for this 48mm focus stacked final photo.


A larger version of this image is available here.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/10/2022 7:00:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, April 8, 2022

While the individual grains of sand in a dune likely have some color variation, those grains blend together at typical landscape photo distances, leaving most dunes a single color. A single color does not alone make an interesting photo. Therefore, shadows rule in the dunes — they are necessary to add intrigue.

Shadows are created by uneven lighting, and the early and late sun angle brings on the desired strong directional lighting (barring clouds).

Taking a dune image to the next step means finding great shadows, and footprint shadows do not fit into my "great" definition (unless the footprints are an intentional part of the composition).

Rarely is wind appreciated for photography, and it is especially unwelcomed when photographing landscapes. However, I celebrated as a significant wind storm blew through during the drive from Las Vegas to Death Valley National Park. The dust and sand were dense enough to severely impact visibility at times, rocking, and properly initiating the brand new Toyota RAV 4 rental SUV.

Why celebrate a wind storm in the desert? The wind erased ALL of the Death Valley dunes' footprints, replacing them with fresh, seemingly unending and highly photogenic ripples in the sand.

The Canon RF 24-70mm F2.8 L IS USM Lens on a Canon EOS R5 proved the optimal choice in the Death Valley National Park dunes. While focal lengths outside this range had compositional opportunities, the 24-70mm angles of view enabled emphasis on the close subjects while keeping the background details relatively large in the frame.

Still, the depth of field available (at apertures not impacted by diffraction) from this focal length range was often insufficient. The R5's focus bracketing feature was the solution to that problem. With focus bracketing enabled, the smallest increment specified, and the number of shots set far above what was ever needed (the camera automatically stops at infinity), the R5 proved itself foolproof, automatically delivering the complete required range of sharp focus bracketed images at nearly a 100% rate (and I probably caused the 1 or two insufficient sets). Walk up to a scene, select the composition, position the focus point on the closest subject (the closest sand), and press the shutter release. This strategy takes away the careful attention to the depth of field otherwise required and facilitates images not otherwise possible.

Do you ever struggle to obtain the ideal white balance? I do, and this image challenged me. Unfortunately, adding the needed contrast creates a bright yellow glow that I've been attempting to neutralize. This image is one of those likely to get re-adjusted in the weeks and months to come.


A larger version of this image is available here.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/8/2022 8:55:59 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, April 7, 2022

Check out the new Benro GH5C Mini Carbon Fiber Gimbal Head, now in stock at B&H.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Posted to: Canon News, Nikon News, Sony News   Category: Benro News
Post Date: 4/7/2022 9:09:22 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan

From Sigma:

Firmware update for SIGMA Global Vision lenses in SONY E-mount

We would like to announce that a new firmware update is now available for SIGMA Global Vision lenses in SONY E-mount listed below.

[Applicable product]

·SIGMA 16mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary in SONY E-mount
·SIGMA 30mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary in SONY E-mount

[Benefits of the update]

The specification has been changed so that the focus position of the lens when the ON/OFF (power) switch is turned “ON”, or when the camera is restored from power save, is set to the same shooting distance when the ON/OFF (power) switch was turned “OFF” or when power save was activated.

——————————————————————————————————————

[Applicable product]

·SIGMA 56mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary in SONY E-mount

[Benefits of the update]

·The focus position of the lens when the ON/OFF (power) switch is turned “ON” or when the camera is restored from power saving has been changed to the specification that the focus position is set to the shooting distance right before the ON/OFF (power) switch is turned “OFF” or power saving is activated.
·Improved feeling of the MF operation of the lens.

——————————————————————————————————————

[Applicable product]

·SIGMA 35mm F2 DG DN | Contemporary in SONY E-mount

[Benefits of the update]

·It reduces the AF drive sound.

[How to update]

Please select the appropriate product from the following page, go to the download page, click “Sony E-mount” and follow the update procedure.

*After the update is complete, be sure to remove the battery pack from the camera and reinsert it.

Get your Sigma Lens at B&H.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Posted to: Sony News   Category: Sigma Firmware Updates
Post Date: 4/7/2022 8:08:49 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan

A new Sigma Mount Converter MC-11 firmware update is available.

From Sigma:

Thank you for purchasing and using our products.

We would like to announce the availability of a new firmware update for the SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11.

[Applicable Products]

·SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11 EF-E
·SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11 SA-E

[Benefit of the update]

It has improved the phenomenon whereby the lens’s optical stabilizer effect differs depending on the shutter type and drive mode used.

[How to update]

Connect the SIGMA MOUNT CONVERTER MC-11 to the computer with the USB cable provided, and start SIGMA Optimization Pro*. If there is a newer firmware than the connected mount converter firmware, a dialog box will appear with the message “The latest converter firmware is available. Click “Yes” to update the firmware.

Get the Sigma Mount Converter MC-11 at B&H.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Posted to: Sony News   Category: Sigma Firmware Updates
Post Date: 4/7/2022 7:58:53 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, April 6, 2022

Just posted: Manfrotto 645 FAST Twin Leg Video Tripod Review.

Another high value product from Manfrotto.

Order the Manfrotto 645 FAST Twin Leg Video Tripod from B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | WEX

Please share!

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/6/2022 8:22:04 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan

From Capture One:

Feature walkthrough

Keystone Tool redesign

The Keystone Tool has been redesigned with a new user interface. Additionally, Auto Keystone has been added for all camera models, allowing a swift and precise perspective correction of most images.

Tool design

The Keystone Guides have been redesigned to easily place them with greater precision. Additionally, the precision of the guides can be fine-tuned using the keyboard arrows when a guide is selected.

The content of the Keystone Tool has been split into two tabs, ‘Guides’ and ‘Sliders’. Guides offer fully automatic and guided keystone options, while Sliders offer manual adjustments.

The new adjustment ‘Skew’ has been introduced to accommodate a wider range of perspective corrections.

Auto Keystone

Let Capture One detect and correct the perspective automatically. By pressing the ‘Auto’ button in the Keystone Tool, lines in the image(s) are automatically detected, evaluated, and used for the correction. The result is a swift automatic correction with high precision.

By default, Auto Keystone will correct Vertical Keystone. This can be changed by simply selecting one of the other two guide modes to activate the cursor tool. The icon within the ‘Auto’ button will change accordingly and pressing it will instantly apply the desired correction. Auto Keystone works on batches of images.

Auto Keystone can also be triggered from the regular Auto Adjust functionality in the main toolbar. To do this, tick Keystone in the drop-down menu of Auto Adjust. Note that only Vertical Keystone is available from Auto Adjust.

If Capture One is unable to detect suitable lines in the image, pressing ‘Auto’ will have no effect.

Read more here.

General user experience improvements and tweaks

Apple Silicon (M1) performance improvements

The following areas have been improved:

Preview generation is up to 100% faster.

Luma Mask rendering is up to 300% faster. This makes it faster to render the initial Luma Mask and significantly faster to tweak the luminosity range afterward.

Feather and Refine Mask are up to 1.000% faster.

Fujifilm X-Trans raw loading is up to 100% faster, making the preview generation and rendering when zooming feels significantly faster on images from Fujifilm APS-C cameras.

Improved Auto Rotate

The algorithm behind Auto Rotate has been improved, providing more accurate results on images where clear lines are visible. This makes it more valuable with, for example, landscape images with clear horizons.

Crop Aspect Ratio behavior

Changing the Aspect Ratio from the Crop Tool will now immediately apply this ratio to the selected image. This makes it easier and more intuitive to work with different aspect ratios, as you don’t have to make a change to the crop for the new ratio to apply.

Easier access to drop-down menus

Drop-down menus that were previously only accessible by long-pressing their icons are now easier to open. Most icons have gotten a downwards arrow that will open the menu, and all menus can be opened by right-clicking their icons.

New default sorting option

Collections will now sort by Date instead of Name by default. This default can be changed in General Preferences, where both the sorting criteria and direction can be customized. This only affects new collections.

Capture One Live add-on

Live Sessions can be now configured to last for 1, 3, 5, 7, or 14 days. You can choose between the different options upon starting a new Live Session that suits both your and your collaborator’s needs.

License changes

Capture One Fujifilm/Sony/Nikon converted to Pro

Subscription users of Capture One Fujifilm/Sony/Nikon will automatically have their license upgraded to Capture One Pro at no additional cost. Perpetual owners will need to upgrade via the upgrade store.

Read more here.

The Capture One 22 (15.2.0) release notes provide the full details on this update.

Get Capture One at B&H.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/6/2022 8:05:27 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, April 5, 2022

Just posted: Manfrotto 608 Nitrotech Fluid Video Head Review.

This head has a solid feature set and strong performance for the price.

Order the Manfrotto 608 Nitrotech Fluid Video Head from B&H | Adorama | Amazon USA | WEX

Please share!

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/5/2022 8:05:54 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, April 4, 2022

Check out the tiny (1.9 x 1.2 x 0.8" / 47.3 x 30.4 x 20 mm) transmitters in the new DJI MIC wireless microphone kit:

DJI Mic Now Available

DJI’s first dedicated audio recording system is self-contained and starts up instantly

April 4, 2022– DJI Mic, the first dedicated audio recording product from the world’s leader in civilian drones and creative camera technology, is now available for purchase in the United States.

Overview

DJI Mic is a dual wireless microphone system solution for recording crystal-clear audio at long distances. With 5.5-hours of battery life and a total of 15 hours with the charging case, DJI Mic is ideal for shooting a vlog, interviews, or any kind of content creation that requires high-quality audio. The system consists of two microphone transmitters, a receiver, and an ultra-compact charging case that fits easily into your bag or pocket. It is compatible with smartphones, cameras, DJI OM 5, and DJI Action 2 for high-quality audio.

DJI MIC Wireless Microphone Kit in Charging Case

Key Features

  • Easy Setup: An extra ultra-portable charging case stores the transmitters and receiver and fast-pairs the system just by opening it.
  • Intuitive Design: The transmitters attach via back-clip or magnetic plate. The receiver's built-in touchscreen gives easy access to channel selection, input/output settings, and other essential operations.
  • Portability: Weighing just 30 grams, the transmitter easily clips onto a shirt collar.
  • 250m Max Wireless Transmission Range: Using DJI's latest encryption technology, DJI Mic is capable of recording crisp audio at distances of up to 250 meters (tested in unobstructed environments in direct line of sight).
  • Dual-Channel Recording: DJI Mic comes with two transmitters with built-in microphones, capable of simultaneously recording the sound from two audio sources. Each transmitter has built-in storage of up to 14 hours (8GB) and supports backup recording, ensuring that your audio files are safe and easy to access. Files can be transferred via the USB Type-C Cable and appears as a drive when connected to your PC or Mac. Files are 48,000 Hz, 24-bit mono WAV format.
  • Compatibility: The DJI Mic receiver supports USB-C, Lightning, and 3.5mm TRS interface output, making it compatible with most smartphone, camera, and laptop models.
  • Battery Life: The transmitters and receiver both boast a 5.5-hour battery life and a total of 15 hours with the compact charging case.
  • Variable gain control: DJI Mic has flexible variable gain control from two independent audio sources.
  • Safety Track: A secondary audio track is recorded as a backup with a lower volume of -6 dB (different from the main audio track), which helps to safeguard your audio in case of unforeseen issues.
  • Multi-level Control: Adjust input and output sensitivity between -12dB ~ 12dB and find the perfect setting for your surroundings.
  • Microphone Furry Windscreen: Effectively suppresses wind and noisy environments while still recording clear sound.

DJI MIC Wireless Microphone Kit Parts

In the Box

  • DJI Mic Transmitter x2
  • DJI Mic Receiver x1
  • DJI Mic Charging Case x1 (Weight: 242g; LWH: 103x61x41 cm)
  • DJI Mic Camera Cable (3.5mm TRS) x1
  • DJI Mic Smartphone Connector (Type-C) x1
  • DJI Mic Smartphone Connector (Lightning) x1
  • Charging Cable x1
  • DJI Mic Windscreen x2
  • DJI Mic Magnetic Plate x2
  • DJI Mic Carrying Bag x1

Orders

Order the DJI MIC Wireless Microphone Kit at B&H.

"The DJI Mic Wireless Microphone Kit from DJI enables vloggers and other creators to capture two-channel audio with their action camera at distances up to 820'. This wireless mic kit consists of two transmitters, one receiver, a portable charging case, cables, wind socks, and 3.5mm TRS to USB adapters."

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Posted to: Canon News, Nikon News, Sony News   Category: DJI News
Post Date: 4/4/2022 8:34:38 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, April 3, 2022

Zabriskie Point in Death Valley National Park is one of those locations that evokes the kid in a candy store emotion for landscape photographers.

Ordering the chaos in a beautiful scene is a frequent landscape photography challenge. While details abound at Zabriskie Point, these details are more easily ordered than most. In addition, there are so many strong shapes and colors here that direct light becomes much less important. While Zabriskie Point's morning and evening light is especially attractive, some of my favorite images were taken before sunrise and after sunset.

Having so many great compositions makes selecting a few favorites to share a mental challenge. Of course, culling many images would have been easier if I had approached the area in an orderly manner. Instead, I opted to revisit subjects for a fresh take, ensuring an open mind to find the best options. Still, I'm certain that a return trip would generate new compositions in this target-rich environment.

A pair of Canon EOS R5 bodies with Canon RF 24-70mm F2.8 L IS USM and Canon RF 70-200mm F2.8 L IS USM Lenses mounted provided the ideal angle of view range for this location and, of course, outstanding image quality.


A larger version of this image is available here.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 4/3/2022 7:00:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, March 31, 2022

Watch and listen to Canon Explorer of Light Bruce Dorn as he photographs a galloping horse and rider with the Canon EOS R3 and RF 100-500mm L IS USM Lens and then explains the compositional choice.

Learn more:

Canon EOS R3 Review
Canon RF 100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM Lens Review

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Posted to: Canon News, Nikon News, Sony News   Category: Photography Deals
Post Date: 3/31/2022 1:56:13 PM ET   Posted By: Bryan

A June sunrise image of The Loche in Rocky Mountain National Park requires a 2.7 mi, 1,056 ft elevation gain hike in the middle of the night. Getting location information on a relatively remote lake early in the season is challenging, but there was a report of open water, so my daughter and I set off for an adventure.

Upon arrival, the report proved technically correct. However, ice prevailed in the target location. While the ice would have been an OK foreground (these mountains can make nearly any foreground work), a reflection was the big benefit of hiking to a lake.

Moving to a nearby small area of open water accomplished the reflection goal. Here, a twisted tree and its roots, along with rocks flowing into the scene, provided additional foreground entertainment at this location.

Back to the leading question: Why don't I use graduated neutral density (GND) filters?

I'll start with the answer to a more basic question, what is a graduated neutral density (GND) filter?

Since Wikipedia already created this answer, I'll share it here:

"A graduated neutral-density filter, also known as a graduated ND filter, split neutral-density filter, or just a graduated filter, is an optical filter that has a variable light transmission. Typically half of the filter is of neutral density which transitions, either abruptly or gradually, into the other half which is clear. It is used to bring an overly-bright part of a scene into the dynamic range of film or sensor. For example, it can be used to darken a bright sky so that both the sky and subject can be properly exposed. ND filters can come in a variety of shapes and sizes and densities and can be used in all types of photographic applications from still photography, motion photography and scientific applications."

Here is the big problem. In general, graduated ND filters have straight lines of transition. However, these filters are primarily needed outdoors, and the outdoor landscape transition from dark to bright is seldom a straight line — unless a large body of water or a great plain fills the background. It is unrealistic to create filters for every horizon shape, and especially wide-angle zoom lenses usually have focal lengths with geometric distortion that further complicates the needed transition shape.

While soft transition GND filters better hide the dark to light transition, the final image seldom hides the unnatural brightness change.

Round threaded GND filters are available, and logically using one requires the brightness transition to be placed in the middle of the frame — another big limitation. To vary the location of the brightness change requires rectangular filters sized much larger than the front of the lens. While the density transition is still in the center of these filters, the larger size means they can be positioned off-center, placing the brightness transition anywhere desired.

Rectangular GND filters can be handheld during the shot, though avoiding movement against the lens requires a steady hand, and holding the filter slightly off of the lens permits light leaks (that may or may not matter). A filter holder provides a better solution optically, but the large rectangular filters require even larger filter holders.

Purchasing the complete set of transition types (hard to soft) and densities required to ideally mix the various lighting levels encountered, along with a filter holder, is expensive. In addition, the functional set is somewhat burdensome to carry and time-consuming to set up.

What is the alternative? Capture the scene in two or more exposures (if necessary, as processing a single image to differing brightness may be adequate), and blend the results using an HDR technique. A straight transition line is no longer important, and the adjusted areas do not need to be contiguous. Any brightness transition rate can be used (hard to soft), and the rate can vary in a single image.

Additionally, all focal lengths and lens sizes are supported, from a circular fisheye to the longest telephoto lens available.

I can often tell when a GND filter was used for an image, and usually, the result is not my favorite. Not everyone shares my view, and that is OK.

There are a lot of graduated ND filters sold, and sometimes only a graduated ND filter can get the job done properly. A primary advantage of graduated neutral density filters is that action transcending the density change (waves on an ocean, for example) remains perfectly aligned. Another big filter advantage is that post-processing is greatly reduced or eliminated, and those recording video or JPG format still images need to capture the final brightness.

Circling back to the image shared here. There are no graduated neutral density filters in the shape of the shadow line. Also, the perfect filter to match the digital graduated neutral density processing needed to darken the sky, excluding the tree. That filter, of course, does not exist. Thus, I don't carry it — or any other variant.


A larger version of this image is available here.

Share on Facebook! Share on X! Share on Pinterest! Email this page to a friend!
Post Date: 3/31/2022 7:00:00 AM ET   Posted By: Bryan
< Previous     1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 |    Next >
Archives
2024   Jan   Feb
2023   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2022   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2021   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2020   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2019   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2018   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2017   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2016   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2015   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2014   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2013   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2012   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2011   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2010   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2009   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2008   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2007   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2006   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2005   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
Terms of Use, Privacy  |  © 2024 Rectangular Media, LLC  |  Bryan CarnathanPowered by Christ!