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 Tuesday, February 19, 2019
The EOS 6D Mark II is the smallest, lightest and least expensive latest-model Canon full frame DSLR and the EOS RP enters the market as the smallest, lightest and least expensive Canon full frame mirrorless interchangeable lens camera (MILC). With the EOS RP using a slightly-modified EOS 6D Mark II sensor, these two cameras produce nearly identical image quality. However, the difference between DSLRs and MILCs is rather big with the difference between electronic viewfinders and optical viewfinders being a primary difference. That page discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each design and I'll forgo most additional discussion in that regard in this comparison. Let's dive into the advantages of each camera model:
 
Canon EOS RP Advantages
 
  • DIGIC 8 vs. 7
  • More AF points (via viewfinder): 4,779 vs. 45
  • Eye AF vs. no
  • 100% viewfinder coverage vs. 98%
  • Lower light AF working range: EV -5 vs. EV -3
  • Lower light exposure metering: EV -3 vs. EV 1
  • .CR3 RAW file type with C-RAW vs .CR2 with M-RAW, S-RAW
  • 4k video
  • Headphone jack vs. no
  • Supports SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-II vs. UHS-I
  • Smaller size: 5.22 x 3.35 x 2.76" vs. 5.67 x 4.35 x 2.94"
    (132.5 x 85.0 x 70.0mm vs. 144.0 x 110.5 x 74.8mm)
  • Lighter weight: 17.1 oz vs. 26.98 oz (485 vs. 765g)
  • Lower price
  • Can utilize RF lenses
Canon EOS 6D Mark II Advantages
 
  • Cross-type AF points vs. single-line-sensitive
  • Has greater auto exposure compensation range: +/-5 EV vs. +/-3 EV
  • Faster continuous shooting rate: 6.5 fps vs. 5 fps (4 fps with Servo AF)
  • Shorter viewfinder blackout during continuous shooting
  • Has built-in GPS vs. optional accessory
  • Has much longer battery life: Approx. 1200 vs. 250
  • Uses N3 type remote controls vs. E3
  • Has top LCD and more buttons

 
Canon EOS RP Size Comparison with 6D Mark II
 
Summary
 
With these two cameras having the same heart, the imaging sensor, producing similar image quality, it is especially interesting to compare these two models. If photographing action is on your to-do list, the 6D Mark II is probably better-suited for your needs and some of the other 6D II advantages are important for certain uses. The travel-friendly smaller size and lighter weight along with the wallet-friendly lower cost are going to win the RP a lot of hearts as will some of its other features including the larger, full-coverage viewfinder and 4k video. The purchase of either of these models over the other can be justified, but I expect the RP to quickly become the more popular option.
 
More Information: Canon EOS RP | Canon EOS 6D Mark II
 
Specifications: Canon EOS RP compared to the Canon EOS 6D Mark II
 
 
Get your EOS RP or 6D Mark II Here:
 
Canon EOS RP: B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX
 
Canon EOS 6D Mark II: B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 2/19/2019 10:15:18 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, February 18, 2019
As the long-awaited Canon full frame mirrorless camera line is beginning to fill out, the first two models are worth comparing. The Canon EOS R vs. Canon EOS RP comparison using the site's specifications tool shows most of the differences between these cameras. Those and a handful of others are included below.
 
EOS R Advantages
 
  • Higher resolution: 30.4 MP vs. 26.2 (6720 x 4480 vs. 6240 x 4160 px)
  • Dual Pixel RAW file format vs. no
  • More dynamic range
  • More AF points: 5,655 vs. 4,779
  • Lower AF working range: EV -6 vs. EV -5
  • Faster shutter speed available: 1/8000 vs. 1/4000
  • Faster X-Sync shutter speed: 1/200 vs. 1/180
  • Larger, higher resolution EVF: 0.5" (1.27cm) OLED color EVF, 3.69M dots (with more nose relief) vs. 0.39" (1.0cm) OLED color EVF, 2.36M dots
  • Larger, higher resolution LCD: 3.15" (8.01cm), approx. 2.10M dots vs. 2.95" (7.50cm) approx. 1.04 million dots
  • Better LCD Coatings: Anti-reflection and anti-smudge vs. anti-smudge only
  • Faster continuous frame rate: 8 fps vs. 5 fps, with AF tracking: 5 fps vs. 4 fps
  • Has a programmable Multi-Function Bar vs. no
  • Has a top LCD vs. dedicated mode dial
  • Better video capabilities including higher frame rate video and more compression options: Up to 10-bit Canon Log vs. 8-bit no log
  • USB 3.0 vs. 2.0
  • Longer battery life rating: approx. 370 shots vs. 250
  • Higher shutter durability rating: 200,000 vs. 100,000
  • Closes shutter on power-off vs. no
  • Has access to a PC Terminal via Battery Grip BG-E22 vs. no
  • Has a battery grip available vs. extension grip
EOS RP Advantages
 
  • Significantly lower price
  • Smaller size: 5.22 x 3.35 x 2.76" vs. 5.35 x 3.87 x 3.32" (132.5 x 85.0 x 70.0mm vs. 135.8 x 98.3 x 84.4mm)
  • Lighter weight: 17.1 vs. 23.3 oz (485 vs. 660g)
  • Has focus bracketing vs. no
  • Has Eye-tracking Servo AF vs. not until later in 2019
  • More Diopter Correction: -4 to +2 m-1 vs. -4 to +1 m-1
Summary
 
The EOS R is a higher-end model and that shows very strongly in its list of advantages. However, the first three RP advantages are very significant ones. Those on a tight budget are going to be favoring the RP. While the EOS R is itself a relatively small and light camera, the RP easily bests it in these categories and those traveling, hiking, etc. may be willing to forgo the R's benefits to also give up some size and weight.
 
More Information: Canon EOS R | Canon EOS RP
 
Get Your EOS R or RP Here:
 
Canon EOS R: B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX
 
Canon EOS RP: B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 2/18/2019 10:28:20 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, February 11, 2019
Those photographers looking for a versatile full frame camera but not needing the blazing speed afforded by a pro sports body (and who are not interested in a mirrorless option) will likely be considering either the Canon 5D Mark IV or Nikon D850 DSLR camera. Both DSLRs are the mature, durable, refined culminations of their respective camera lines. But which is right for your particular needs? Read on to find out.
 
Shared Primary Features
 
  • Full-frame sensor
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-5 EV
  • Shutter Speed: 30-1/8000 sec., Bulb
  • Viewfinder Coverage: approx. 100%
  • 3.2" size-class touchscreen LCD
  • No pop-up flash
  • Continuous Shooting Speed: 7 fps (Nikon D850 can achieve 9 fps with optional battery grip)
  • 4K recording up to 30 fps
  • Built-in Wi-Fi
  • SuperSpeed USB 3.0, 3.5mm headphone & microphone jacks, HDMI Type-C
  • Dual memory card slots
  • Weather sealing
  • Similar size & weight
Advantages of the Canon 5D Mark IV
 
  • More Selectable AF Points: 61 vs. 55
  • More Selectable Cross-type AF Points: 41 vs. 35
  • More AF Points Supporting f/8 (total/selectable): 21/21 vs. 15/9
  • Live View Focusing: Dual Pixel CMOS AF vs. contrast detection
  • NFC vs. N/A
  • Built-in GPS vs. optional accessory
Advantages of the Nikon D850
 
  • Higher Resolution: 45.7 MP vs. 30.4
  • More AF Points: 153 vs. 61
  • More Cross-type AF Points: 99 vs. 41
  • Larger AF Working Range: EV-4 to EV 20 vs. EV-3 to EV 20
  • Larger Metering Range: EV -3 – 20 vs. EV 0 – 20
  • Lower Selectable ISO (native/expanded): 64/32 vs. 100/50
  • Better dynamic range
  • More Registered Custom White Balance Settings: 6 vs. 1
  • Higher Resolution LCD: 2,359K dots vs. 1,620K
  • Tilting LCD vs. fixed
  • Faster Flash Sync Speed: 1/250 sec. vs. 1/200
  • Full Sensor Width 4K Recording vs. 1.74x crop
  • Bluetooth vs. N/A
  • Battery Life: 1,840 shots vs. 900
  • Shutter Durability: 200,000 shots vs. 150,000
  • Automated AF Fine Tune vs. manual Autofocus Microadjustment
  • 8K in-camera time-lapse vs. FHD 1080p time-lapse
  • Negative Digitizer Mode vs. N/A
  • Backlit buttons vs. N/A
  • Focus Shift mode vs. N/A
  • More Auto Exposure Bracketing Images: 9 vs. 7
  • Limited Focus Peaking vs. N/A
Other Differences: 5D Mark IV vs. Nikon D850
 
  • CompactFlash, SDXC vs. XQD, SDXC
  • 4K DCI 4096 X 2160 vs. 4K UHD 3840 X 2160
Who should opt for the Canon 5D Mark IV?
 
While the advantages of the D850 listed above may seem pretty long, if you're already heavily invested in the Canon system, you have to ask yourself whether or not those benefits are worth the high cost of selling used items to fund alternate gear and the time investment required to acclimate to the new system. For some, the advantages may be worth the tradeoffs. For others, the 5D Mark IV's feature set makes it a more than worthwhile addition to their kits.
 
If you are a videographer who plans to use autofocus tracking while filming, the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV will be the best option by far. Canon's Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology is significantly better at locking onto subjects compared to the contrast detection sensor AF utilized by the Nikon D850.
 
While many will not like the 5D Mark IV's heavy crop with 4K recording, some videographers (especially those shooting wildlife) may find the crop beneficial for more tightly framing distant and/or smaller subjects.
 
Want to shoot with the widest aperture lenses possible? F/1.2 aperture primes with autofocus are a reality for Canon DSLR and mirrorless customers; Nikon users will have to invest in a Z 7 / Z 6 and wait for the release of the manual focus-only Z 58mm f/0.95 S Noct to use an aperture wider than f/1.4.
 
Who should opt for the Nikon D850?
 
Those with Nikon-based kits who do not need the benefits of Canon's Dual Pixel CMOS AF sensor have little (if any) reason to switch brands; the Nikon D850 is one of the most feature-packed and versatile cameras available today.
 
Summary
 
While the advantages listed in the Nikon D850 column seem strong, both of these cameras are highly capable of tackling a wide range of situations with nearly equal proficiency. As I said in the introduction, these cameras represent the culmination of generations of camera design. The technological innovations, durability and user interface refinements that come with that time and attention to detail are apparent the first day you use the cameras. Those heavily invested in either system will likely want to stay with their familiar respective brands, but those with fewer ties will likely opt for the Nikon D850 for primarily stills use while those prioritizing filmmaking and want the benefits of solid AF performance will likely opt for the 5D Mark IV.
 
Relevant Info
 
Post Date: 2/11/2019 7:09:34 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, December 24, 2018
Those wanting an entry-level, yet feature rich DSLR will likely be considering the Canon EOS 77D and Canon EOS Rebel T7i / 800D. And while the two bodies appear (and, in fact, are) very similar, there are a few differences that may tip the decision-making scales in one direction or the other. So, let's take a closer look at these DSLRs to see how they stack up against one another, beginning with their similarities.
 
Canon EOS 77D and EOS Rebel T7i / 800D Shared Primary Features
 
  • Sensor: 24.2 MP Dual Pixel CMOS AF 1.6x (crop) APS-C
  • Processor: DIGIC 7
  • Autofocus System: 45 cross-type AF points, 27 f/8 points
  • AF Working Range: EV -3 - 18
  • Metering Sensor: 7560-pixel RGB+IR, 63 segments
  • Metering Range: EV 1 – 20
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-5 EV in 1/3 or 1/2 stop increment
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing: 2, 3, 5 or 7 Shots +/-3 EV 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments
  • ISO: Auto (100 - 25600), 100 - 25600 (H1: 51200)
  • Shutter Speed: 30 - 1/4000 sec
  • Continuous Shooting: max. 6 fps for 27 RAW
  • Video: up to FHD 1920 x 1080 at 60p
  • Identical White Balance Settings
  • Viewfinder: Pentamirror, 95% coverage, 0.82x magnification
  • LCD: Vari-angle touchscreen 7.7 cm (3.0") 3:2 Clear View II TFT, approx. 1040 K sRGB dots
  • Built-in Flash: 13.1m guide number, up to 17mm
  • X-Sync: 1/200 sec
  • Identical Shooting Modes
  • Identical Picture Styles
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, NFC and Low-Energy Bluetooth
  • USB 2.0, HDMI micro, 3.5mm external microphone port
  • Single Secure Digital (SD, UHS-I) Memory Card Slot
  • Battery Life: 820 shots via an LP-E17 battery
  • Body Materials: aluminum alloy and polycarbonate resin with glass fiber
  • Size: 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm)
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS 77D
 
  • Top LCD Data Panel
  • Multi-function Lock Switch
  • Auto Display-Off Sensor by the viewfinder
  • AF On button
  • Rear Control Dial vs. Cross Keys
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7i / 800D
 
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the Canon EOS 77D?
 
Few camera comparisons are as simple as this one. If the features listed in the Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS 77D section are worth its incremental cost over the Canon EOS Rebel T7i, then the decision is easy – get the 77D. The top LCD panel and AF On button (enabling back-button focus) specifically are features that many photographers will find especially beneficial, making the incremental investment over the Rebel T7i a worthwhile one.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i?
 
If the EOS 77D's advantages listed above are of little value to you, or your budget is limited, then the Canon EOS Rebel T7i has gives you 95% of features of the 77D but at a lower cost. Like all top-end Rebels before it, you get a lot of value for your money.
 
Relevant Info
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/24/2018 1:11:32 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, November 8, 2018
The EOS R represents Canon's initial foray into the mirrorless camera market and many may be wondering how it stacks up against Sony's feature-packed, budget-priced a7 III. If you fall into that group, read on as we compare these two cameras.
 
Sony a7 III & Canon EOS R Shared Primary Features
 
  • Mirrorless camera technologies
  • Metering Range: EV -3 to EV 20
  • Shutter Speed Range: 30-1/8000, Bulb
  • 4K Video Recording: 4K (16:9) 3840 x 2160 at 30p
  • USB 3.0, HDMI mini out (Sony: Type D, Canon: Type C) , External Microphone In / Line In (Stereo mini jack), Headphone socket (Stereo mini jack)
  • Operating Environment: 32–104°F / 0–40°C
Primary Advantages of the Sony a7 III:
 
  • Compatible with more native-mount lenses
  • Sensor Stabilization: 5-axis Optical In-Body Image Stabilization vs. 5-Axis Movie Digital IS Image Stabilization
  • Tracks eye in Single-Shot and Continuous AF vs. One Shot only *
  • More Metering Zones: 1200-zone vs. 384-zone
  • Higher ISO Setting: 204800 vs. 102400
  • Better Dynamic Range
  • Wider Exposure Compensation: +/- 5 EV vs. +/- 3 EV
  • Faster x-sync: 1/250 sec vs. 1/200
  • Faster Burst Shooting: 10 fps vs. 8 (One Shot mode), 5 with AF Tracking
  • No crop-factor in 4K vs. 1.75x crop
  • Better Slow Motion Video: 1920 x 1080 at 120 fps with sound/AF tracking vs. 720p at 60 fps with no sound/AF tracking
  • Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC vs. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth only
  • Dual Memory Cards: Memory Stick/SD (UHS-I) + SD (UHS-II) vs. SD (UHS-II) only
  • Higher Battery Life: 610 shots vs. 370
  • Slightly Smaller: 5.0 x 3.9 x 3.0" (126.9 x 95.6 x 73.7mm) vs. 5.35 x 3.87 x 3.32" (135.8 x 98.3 x 84.4mm)
  • Lower cost
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS R:
 
  • Higher Resolution: 30.4 MP vs. 24.2
  • More AF Points: 5,655 points vs. 693
  • More Sensitive AF: EV -6 to +18 vs. EV -3 to +20
  • Faster AF in One Shot mode
  • Wider Auto ISO Range: ISO 100-40000 vs. 100-12800
  • Higher Resolution Viewfinder: 0.5" (1.27cm) OLED EVF, 3.69m-dots vs. 0.5" (1.3cm) OLED Tru-Finder EVF, 2.36m-dots
  • Larger, Higher Resolution LCD: 3.15" Touch Screen (8.01cm) Clear View LCD II, 2.1m-dots vs. 2.95" (7.49cm) Touch Screen TFT, 921.6K dots
  • Vari-angle LCD vs. tilt only
  • Top LCD vs. none
  • Higher Bit-Rate 4K Video: 480 Mbps (ALL-I) vs. 100 Mbps
  • Larger RAW Buffer: 47 RAW images vs. 40
  • Manual focus guide/focus peaking vs. focus peaking only
  • Better performance with adapted lenses
  • Better/more intuitive menu system
  • Better grip
Who should opt for the Sony a7 III?
 
If you're looking to upgrade to a full frame camera and don't already have a large collection of Canon lenses, or otherwise want to get more serious about photography and prefer to skip on an APS-C sensor body, the Sony a7 III has a lot to offer, including a very reasonable price tag. Sony's IBIS (In-Body Image Stabilization) technology enables up to 5-stops of camera shake compensation with any lens that's mounted to the camera and represents huge advantage for the a7 III. Those shooting static subjects in low-light situations or when using a narrow aperture to obtain a desired depth of field, especially when a non-stabilized lens is mounted to the camera, will greatly appreciate the a7 III's sensor stabilization.
 
Are you a wedding photographer? The a7 III's dual memory card slots can protect once-in-a-lifetime images from being lost due to a corrupted memory card, and the camera's higher dynamic range could come in handy for events needing great exposure latitude. Another a7 III features that wedding/event/festival photographers will surely appreciate include is its significantly longer battery life compared to the EOS R.
 
Fast action shooters will be able to capture a higher percentage of peak-action shots with the a7 III's 10 fps burst rate with AF tracking compared to the EOS R's 5 fps under the same circumstances, while the camera's eye tracking AF will ensure that the subject remains properly focused. Note: The a7 III's continuous burst rate drops to 8 fps with viewfinder Live View (for easier subject tracking) in use.
 
Videographers who want to shoot slow motion video can utilize the a7 III's 120 fps Full HD frame rate to capture smooth, slow motion video with sound and AF tracking. The EOS R's resolution at 120 fps tops out at 720p and sound recording/AF tracking is not supported. Want to get the most out of your high quality, wide angle lenses when shooting in 4K? The a7 III samples the entire width of the full frame sensor when shooting in 4K, meaning your wide angle lenses produce an uncropped field of view, perfect for capturing expansive views. Recording in 4K on the EOS R, on the other hand, results in a 1.75x crop factor for your lenses. That means that a 16-35mm lens mounted to the EOS R produces a full frame equivalent field of view of 28-61.25mm in 4K mode.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS R?
 
If you're highly invested in the Canon EOS system but want to give mirrorless a try, getting the Canon EOS R will allow you to gradually build up a mirrorless kit, taking full advantage of the new RF lenses coming down the pipeline, while being able to fully utilize your existing DSLR lenses in the meantime.
 
Speaking of lenses, at this time, Sony has 43 FE lenses that can natively fit on the Sony a7 III. Of those, 25 cover the entire full-frame sensor. Other lenses (such as Canon EF) can be used on Sony cameras via adapters, but adapted lenses don't perform nearly as well as their native counterparts on Sony alpha-series cameras. However, while the currently announced pool of Canon RF lenses is small by comparison, Canon's EF-EOS R adapters allow nearly full functionality with EF/EF-S/TS-E and MP-E lenses (EF-S lens use results in a cropped recorded image). With Canon EF-series lenses performing similarly to RF lenses on the EOS R, the pool of lenses available for EOS R customers considerably increases. In fact, if you add up all the different EF/EF-S/TS-E and MP-E lenses which have been produced since the EF mount was introduced and add the announced RF lenses, you'd have more than 175 lenses to choose from, 149 of which cover the entire full frame sensor.
 
From an ergonomics perspective, the EOS R features a deeper grip and raised buttons that are easier to find without having to look at the body. The new Multi-Function Bar may take some getting used to (some may not like it), but many photographers will find the Control Ring found on the new RF lenses helpful for changing a preferred setting. For those used to glancing at a top LCD to check camera settings, the EOS R has you covered.
 
Landscape photographers can enjoy the benefits of the Canon Drop-in Filter Mount Adapter EF-EOS R with their EOS R to enable a circular polarizer or variable ND filter to be used with any of their EF-series lenses. With most ultra-wide angle lenses being incompatible with front filters, the Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter will prove to be a vital component of many landscape shooters' kits.
 
If you're a portrait shooter, you'll likely prefer the EOS R's faster AF performance in One-Shot mode compared to the Sony a7 III which defocuses/refocuses with every shot even if your subject hasn't moved. Those shooting portraits will also enjoy the bokeh-accentuating, shallow DOF (Depth of Field) capabilities that Canon's RF and EF mounts offer, including lenses featuring extremely wide f/1.2 apertures.
 
Vloggers and those shooting self-portraits will find the EOS R's vari-angle LCD much better for self-framing compared to the a7 III's tilt-screen.
 
* Canon claims a future firmware update will enable Eye AF with AI Servo mode.
 
Summary
 
The Canon EOS R and Sony a7 III are both incredible cameras at good-value prices and either can be a great option for most needs.
 
Relevant Info
 
Post Date: 11/8/2018 12:10:35 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, September 24, 2018
With the announcement of the EOS R, many may be wondering if diving into Canon's mirrorless system is the right step forward in regards to their next camera upgrade or if the Canon EOS 6D Mark II will fill their needs just fine. Therefore, we're going to take a closer look at these two cameras to see which might be the better choice for your needs.
 
Canon EOS R & Canon EOS 6D Mark II Shared Primary Features
 
  • ISO Range: Auto 100-40000 (in 1/3-stop or whole stop increments), L:50, H1: 51200, H2: 102400
  • White Balance Settings, including Ambience priority/White priority
  • 5-axis Digital IS during movie recording
  • Single memory card slot
  • Operating Environment: 32–104°F / 0–40°C
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS R
 
  • RF Mount: Compatible with RF and EF/TS-E/MP-E/EF-S lenses via adapter
  • Higher Resolution: 30.4 MP vs. 26.2
  • Newer Processor: DIGIC 8 vs. DIGIC 7
  • More AF Points: 5,655 point AF system vs. 45
  • More Sensitive AF: EV -6 – 18 vs. EV -3 - 18
  • Eye Detect AF vs. N/A
  • Built in LED AF assist beam
  • Higher Burst Rate without AF Tracking: 8 fps vs. 6.5
  • Larger RAW Buffer: 47 vs. 21
  • Fv (Flexible priority) AE vs. N/A
  • Wider Metering Range: EV -3 – 20 vs. EV 1 - 20
  • Larger Shutter Speed Range: 30 - 1/8000 sec. vs. 30 - 1/4000
  • Faster x-Sync: 1/200 sec. vs. 1/180
  • Truely Silent Shooting: Absolutely no sound vs. quieter-than-normal "silent" shutter
  • Higher Resolution LCD: Vari-angle touch screen 3.15" (8.01cm) Clear View LCD II, approx. 2.10 million dots, 60p vs. Vari-angle touch screen 3.0" (7.7cm) Clear View II TFT, approx. 1040K dots, 30p
  • Higher Resolution Video: Up to 4K at 30p / FHD 1080p at 60p vs. FHD 1080p at 60p
  • RAW, C-RAW and Dual Pixel RAW vs. RAW, M-RAW, S-RAW
  • Compatibility with Faster Memory Cards: UHS-II vs. UHS-I
  • Lighter Weight: 23.3 oz (660g) vs. 26.98 oz (765g)
  • Smaller Size: 5.35 x 3.87 x 3.32" (135.8 x 98.3 x 84.4mm) vs. 5.67 x 4.35 x 2.94" (144.0 x 110.5 x 74.8mm)
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS 6D Mark II
 
  • EF Mount: Compatible with significantly more native-mount lenses
  • Higher Burst Rate with AF tracking: 6.5 fps vs. 5
  • Longer Battery Life: 1200 vs .370
  • Lower Cost
Other Differences Between the Canon EOS R and Canon EOS 5D Mark IV
 
  • Electronic viewfinder vs. optical
  • 384-zone metering vs. 63 zone, 7560-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor
Who should opt for the Canon EOS R?
 
If you read our Canon EOS R vs. Canon EOS 5D Mark IV comparison, you'll recognize a lot of the benefits listed below. The reason is simple – many of the EOS R's benefits are unique to Canon's new mirrorless system, especially in regards to the R's use with adapted lenses, and those benefits remain the same when the camera is stacked up against any Canon DSLR.
 
The EOS R features an RF mount. Upon the camera's release, the selection of RF lenses will be relatively small (only four have been announced). While that may seem limiting, the truth is that the EOS R with its RF mount will be even more versatile than the EF-mount 6D mark II if adapted lenses are taken into consideration. With the Canon Mount Adapter EF-EOS R, Control Ring Mount Adapter and Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter, the EOS R is compatible with EF/TS-E/MP-E and – in a first for Canon full-frame cameras – EF-S lenses as well. So while the selection of RF lenses may be limited for the time being, the unique capabilities afforded by Canon's mount adapters will make the EOS R very attractive for several types of photographers.
 
Which photographers, precisely? Landscape photographers, portrait photographers and videographers will especially appreciate the benefits of the Drop-In Mount Adapter. How often do landscape photographers want to use CPOLs (circular polarizers) or ND (neutral density) filters with wide angle or ultra-wide angle lenses that are incompatible with front filters? Up until now, using filters with such lenses required the use of cumbersome 3rd-party front filter adapters. With the EOS R, those photographing the great outdoors can enjoy the benefits of a lighter camera body as well as a universal CPOL/vari-ND filter solution for their existing lens collection when traveling to their favorite sunrise location. Landscape photographers often want to stack a circular polarizer with an ND filter on a wide angle lens featuring front filter threads, but the resulting mechanical vignetting (and the increased likelihood of stuck filters) makes using the combo impractical. The Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter with Variable ND filter –with 1.5 - 9 stops of density – can easily be paired with a front-mounted circular polarizer like the B+W XS-Pro CPOL. A B+W XS-Pro CPOL will allow landscape photographers to cut through glare to capture dark blue skies and saturated foliage yet is thin enough not to cause mechanical vignetting on most wide angle lenses. And with a rear-mounted variable ND, a photographer can simultaneously reap the benefits of a long shutter speed to capture the movement of flowing water, clouds, rustling trees, etc.
 
The EOS R will be the better option to capture recitals, dance and theater performances with its absolutely silent shooting mode.
 
Those shooting portraiture will certainly appreciate the EOS R's Eye Detection AF, especially when a wide aperture prime lens is being used either natively or with an adapter. The EOS R's AF system is able to lock focus on and track subjects over a significantly larger portion of the frame compared to the 6D II's 45-point phase-detect AF system, allowing for greater flexibility in subject framing without having to focus and recompose. And because the EOS R utilizes the sensor for focusing, calibration issues associated with traditional phase-detect AF systems can be avoided altogether, better ensuring focus accuracy.
 
If a photographer's off-camera flashes are not capable of high-speed sync, the Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter with Variable ND can enable use of a shutter speed below the camera's x-sync speed (for the R, 1/200 sec.) while using flash and a wide aperture for great subject/background separation.
 
The EOS R can record video at 4K resolution while the 6D Mark II tops out at 1080p. Videographers can either use the extra resoltion to create highly detailed movies or otherwise create stabilized 1080p video and/or create panning movements within the 4K frame. Videographers can also make use of the Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter, especially when used with the variable ND to record video at optimal shutter speeds (typically, 2x the frame rate). With filters attached to the back of lenses, lens changes can occur more quickly (no need to unscrew/mount a separate ND filter) and the variable ND could easily replace numerous traditional ND filters in a filmmaker's kit.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS 6D Mark II?
 
There are benefits and drawbacks to Electronic Viewfinders (EVFs) and Optical Viewfinders (OVFs); neither will be best for/preferred by everyone. The 6D Mark II's viewfinder blackout time is actually shorter than the EOS R's viewfinder stutter during capture, making tracking laterally moving or erratic subjects easier with the OVF. If an optical viewfinder is preferred for any reason, the 6D II is, of course, the obvious choice. Other than that, the primary reasons to get a 6D Mark II are battery performance, preference for unadapted lenses and price. The EOS 6D Mark II's is rated for significantly more shots per battery charge compared to the EOS R. If you're often forgetting to charge and/or pack extra batteries, the 6D II may be the better camera for you. Those who simply don't like using adapters will also be better served by the 6D II. And finally, those whose budgets do not extend to the EOS R, especially when the cost of adapters are considered, may take advantage of the 6D II's slightly lower price tag (instant rebates may augment that difference from time to time).
 
Summary
 
The EOS R's ability to use adapted lenses, and the unique capabilities provided by the adapters, makes Canon's full-frame mirrorless introduction a camera you can effectively use now and well into the future, taking full advantage of all the new RF lenses headed down the pipeline. If compared to DSLRs, the EOS R's features position it somewhere between the 5D Mark IV and 6D Mark II, but certainly closer to the former than the latter. Without instant rebates in place, the price difference between the EOS R and 6D Mark II isn't all that much, even with a Mount Adapter EF-EOS R thrown into the mix. Therefore, most will find the EOS R's benefits to be well worth its incremental cost over the 6D Mark II's MSRP.
 
Relevant Info
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 9/24/2018 10:21:21 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, September 18, 2018
With the announcement of the EOS R, many may be wondering if diving into Canon's new mirrorless system is the right step forward in regards to their next camera upgrade or if the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV is the better choice. Therefore, we're going to take a closer look at these two cameras to see which might be the better choice for your needs.
 
Canon EOS R & Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Shared Primary Features
 
  • Sensor Resolution: 30.4 MP Dual Pixel CMOS AF full-frame sensor
  • Shutter Speed: 30-1/8000 sec
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing: +/-3 stops in 1/3- or 1/2-stop increments
  • Lowest and Highest ISO: L:50, H1: 51200, H2: 102400
  • White Balance Settings (including Ambience/White Priority AWB)
  • Flash x-Sync: 1/200sec
  • No built-in flash
  • Hot Shoe/PC Terminal: Yes / Yes (although EOS R PC terminal only available via BG-E22 accessory)
  • 4K video recording up to 30p with Movie Servo AF
  • 4K screen grab
  • USB 3.0, mic/headphone jacks, HDMI out
  • Built-in Wi-Fi
  • Operating Environment: 32 – 104 °F (0 – 40 °C), 85% or less humidity
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS R
 
  • RF Mount: Compatible with significantly more lenses via adapter
  • DIGIC 8 processor
  • More AF Points: 5,655 point AF system vs. 61
  • More Sensitive AF: EV -6 – 18 vs. EV -3 – 18
  • Eye Detect AF vs. N/A
  • Built in LED AF assist beam
  • Higher Burst Rate: 8 fps vs. 7
  • Larger RAW Buffer: 47 vs. 21
  • Flexible priority AE vs. N/A
  • Wider Metering Range: EV -3 – 20 vs. EV 0 – 20
  • Larger Auto ISO Range: 100 - 40000 ISO vs. 100 - 32000
  • 5-axis Digital IS vs. N/A
  • Truly Silent Shooting: Absolutely no sound vs. quieter-than-normal "silent" shutter
  • Higher Shutter Durability Rating: 200,000 shots vs. 150,000
  • More Flexible/Higher Resolution LCD: Vari-angle touch screen 3.15" (8.01cm), approx. 2.1 million dots, 60p vs. Touch screen 3.2" (8.10cm), approx. 1620K dots, 30p
  • Built-in Bluetooth vs. N/A
  • Smaller Size: 5.35 x 3.87 x 3.32" (135.8 x 98.3 x 84.4mm) vs. 5.93 x 4.58 x 2.99" (150.7 x 116.4 x 75.9mm)
  • Lighter Weight: 23.3 oz (660g) vs. 31.4 oz (890g)
  • Costs less
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV
 
  • EF Mount: Compatible with significantly more native-mount lenses
  • Wider Exposure Compensation: +/-5 EV in 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments vs. +/-3 EV
  • Higher Burst Rate with AF tracking: Max. approx. 7 fps. vs. 5
  • Larger JPEG Buffer: Unlimited vs. 100
  • Built-in NFC vs. N/A
  • Built-in GPS vs. optional via GP-E2 GPS accessory
  • Dual Memory Card Slots: CF/SD (UHI-I) vs. SD (UHI-II) only
  • Water & Dust Resistant
  • Higher Battery Life: 900 shots vs. 370
Other Differences Between the Canon EOS R and Canon EOS 5D Mark IV
 
  • Electronic viewfinder vs. optical
  • 384-zone metering vs. 252-zone, 150,000-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor (315-zone in Live View)
  • RAW, C-RAW and Dual Pixel RAW vs. RAW, M-RAW, S-RAW and Dual Pixel RAW
  • MP4 4K (16:9) 3840 x 2160 vs. MOV 4K (17:9) 4096 x 2160 (Motion JPEG)
Who should opt for the Canon EOS R?
 
The EOS R is the first Canon camera to feature an RF [mirrorless] mount. And upon the camera's release, the selection of RF lenses will be relatively small (four, to be exact). While that may seem limiting, the truth is that the EOS R with its RF mount will be even more versatile than the 5D Mark IV with the tried-and-true EF mount if adapted lenses are taken into consideration. With the Canon Mount Adapter EF-EOS R, Control Ring Mount Adapter and Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter, the EOS R is compatible with EF/TS-E/MP-E and – in a first for Canon full-frame cameras – EF-S lenses as well. So while the selection of RF lenses may be limited for the time being, the unique capabilities afforded by Canon's mount adapters will make the EOS R very attractive for a lot of photographers.
 
Which photographers, precisely? Landscape photographers, portrait photographers and videographers will especially appreciate the benefits of the Drop-In Mount Adapter. How often do landscape photographers want to use CPOLs (circular polarizers) or ND (neutral density) filters with wide angle or ultra-wide angle lenses that are incompatible with front filters? Up until now, using filters with such lenses required the use of cumbersome 3rd-party front filter adapters. With the EOS R, those photographing the great outdoors can enjoy the benefits of a lighter camera body as well as a universal CPOL/vari-ND filter solution for their existing lens collection when traveling to their favorite sunrise location. Landscape photographers often want to stack a circular polarizer with an ND filter on a wide angle lens featuring front filter threads, but the resulting mechanical vignetting (and the increased likelihood of stuck filters) makes using the combo impractical. The Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter with Variable ND filter –with 1.5 - 9 stops of density – can easily be paired with a front-mounted circular polarizer like the B+W XS-Pro CPOL. A B+W XS-Pro CPOL will allow landscape photographers to cut through glare to capture dark blue skies and saturated foliage yet is thin enough not to cause mechanical vignetting on most wide angle lenses. And with a rear-mounted variable ND, a photographer can simultaneously reap the benefits of a long shutter speed to capture the movement of flowing water, clouds, rustling trees, etc.
 
The EOS R will be the better option to capture recitals, dance and theater performances with its absolutely silent shooting mode.
 
Those shooting portraiture will certainly appreciate the EOS R's Eye Detection AF, especially when a wide aperture prime lens is being used either natively or with an adapter. Note that because the EOS R utilizes the sensor for focusing, calibration issues associated with traditional phase-detect AF systems can be avoided, better ensuring focus accuracy. Also, if a photographer's off-camera flashes are not capable of high-speed sync, the Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter with Variable ND can enable use of a shutter speed below the camera's x-sync speed (for the R, 1/200 sec.) while using flash and a wide aperture for great subject/background separation.
 
Videographers will likely make use of the Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter, especially when used with the variable ND to record video at optimal shutter speeds (typically, 2x the frame rate). With filters attached to the back of lenses, lens changes can occur more quickly (no need to unscrew/mount a separate ND filter) and the variable ND could easily replace numerous traditional ND filters in a filmmaker's kit. Both the EOS R and 5D Mark IV sample the center of the sensor for 4K recording which results in a crop factor of 1.75x. However, the EOS R is compatible with EF-S lenses (the 5D Mark IV is not), meaning wide-angle framing does not have to be sacrificed.
 
For those on a limited budget, an EOS R costs significantly less than an EOS 5D Mark IV, even if you add the cost of an EF-EOS R adapter.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV?
 
The EOS 5D Mark IV has at least one very significant benefit over the EOS R – dual memory card slots. While the EOS R and RF 50mm f/1.2L and RF 28-70mm f/2L USM would seem to be an extremely good kit for wedding coverage, the R's single memory card slot means that a card failure could prove absolutely disastrous. For that reason alone, the 5D Mark IV will be a better option for recording once-in-a-lifetime moments.
 
Sports photographers will certainly appreciate the 5D IV's faster continuous burst rate with autofocus tracking for capturing the peak of action, although the R does have a significant edge in the RAW buffer department allowing for longer shooting at its rated speed.
 
There are benefits and drawbacks to Electronic Viewfinders (EVFs) and Optical Viewfinders (OVFs); neither will be best for/preferred by everyone. If an optical viewfinder is preferred, the EOS 5D Mark IV is, of course, the obvious choice.
 
While the EOS R's battery life is proving to be better in real-world shooting than its official specification would indicate, those shooting long events or in situations where battery changes aren't practical (such as heavy rain) may prefer the 5D Mark IV's higher expected battery life. Some photographers will appreciate the 5D Mark IV's built-in NFC and GPS features while others won't blink an eye at the EOS R's lack of them. Those using super telephoto lenses may also prefer the 5D Mark IV's larger size and increased weight to better balance out the camera/lens combination.
 
The 5D Mark IV also benefits from the refinements and reliability found in a mature product line, resulting in a very user-friendly, familiar interface that can be depended upon to work in even challenging conditions. Being Canon's first professional-grade full-frame mirrorless camera, with never before seen features (like the Mult-Function Bar), may take some getting used to and will ultimately have to prove its worthiness of the "refined camera" label.
 
Summary
 
The Canon EOS R and EOS 5D Mark IV were designed to be jack-of-all-trades and can be used effectively to capture... just about anything. The EOS R's ability to use adapted lenses, and the unique capabilities provided by the adapters, makes Canon's full-frame mirrorless introduction a camera you can effectively use now and well into the future, taking full advantage of all the new RF lenses headed down the pipeline. However, its lack of dual memory card slots (along with a few other differences) mean that the EOS 5D Mark IV will remain the better option for a sizeable number of photography professionals.
 
Relevant Info
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 9/18/2018 10:31:36 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, August 21, 2018
Considering the significant price gap between them, it's reasonable for anyone interested in Sony's mirrorless camera system to wonder, "Should I get the a7R III or the a7 III?" With that mind, we're going to take a closer look at these two camera bodies to see which might be the best choice for your needs.
 
Sony a7R III & Sony a7 III Shared Features
 
  • E-mount, compatible with full-frame and APS-C lenses
  • BIONZ X image processor
  • 5-axis Stabilization
  • Contrast Detection AF Points: 425
  • AF Working Range: EV-3 – EV 20
  • Metering System: 1200-zone evaluative, -3 – EV 20
  • Exposure Compensation: +/- 5.0EV in 1/3 EV steps
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing: Up to 9 shots
  • Max Shutter Speed: 1/8000 sec.
  • Viewfinder Size: 1.3 cm (0.5-type) OLED
  • LCD Size: 2.95 inch (3.0-type) tilting touchscreen
  • Flash x-Sync: 1/250 sec.
  • Continuous Shooting Speed: max approx. 10 fps
  • Video Recording: Up to 4K 3840 x 2160 30p / FHD 1920 x 1080 120p
  • Storage: Dual memory card slots (Memory Stick PRO Duo/PRO HG-Duo/Micro M2, SD/SDHC/SDXC)
  • Wireless Features: Built-in Wi-Fi, NFC & Bluetooth
  • Physical Connections: HDMI Type-D, USB 3.0 Type-C, USB 2.0 Micro-B, Microphone 3.5mm, Headphone 3.5mm
  • Operating Range: 32–104°F / 0–40°C
  • Size & Weight: 5.0 x 3.9 x 3.0" (126.9 x 95.6 x 73.7mm), approx. 23 oz (650g)
  • Compatible Battery Grip: VG-C3EM
Primary Advantages of the Sony a7R III
 
  • Higher Sensor Resolution: 42.4 MP vs. 24.2 MP
  • Higher Viewfinder Resolution: 3,686K dots vs. 2,359K
  • Higher LCD Resolution: 1,440K vs. 921K
  • PC terminal vs. none
  • Includes a battery charger vs. optional accessory
Primary Advantages of the Sony a7 III
 
  • More Phase-Detect AF Points: 693 vs. 399
  • Larger ISO Range: ISO 100-51200, exp. to ISO 50 and 204800 vs. ISO 100-32000, exp. to ISO 50-102400
  • Larger Continuous Buffer (RAW, Uncompressed): 40 vs 28
  • Longer Battery Life: 610 shots vs. 530 shots
  • Lower price
Who should opt for the Sony a7R III?
 
With such a huge list of shared features between the two cameras, the a7R III advantages list is unsurprsingly short. While many will appreciate the a7R III's higher resolution viewfinder and LCD panel, undoubtedly the most important difference between the two cameras is sensor resolution. The difference between 42.4 and 24.2 MP is substantial. If you're shooting subjects where resolving small details is a primary concern, or otherwise want the ability to heavily crop photos for better framing (or to extend the reach of a not-long-enough telephoto lens), then Sony a7R III's higher resolution sensor will be worth the incremental investment over the a7 III.
 
Who should opt for the Sony a7 III?
 
If you've been on the fence about investing in a Sony mirrorless camera and you don't need the massive resolution of the a7R III or the blazingly fast frame rate of the a9, then the Sony a7 III has your name on it. It may be positioned in the lineup as Sony's entry-level full-frame camera, but the only indication of the a7 III's entry-level status is its price tag. The a7 III's comprehensive assortment of advanced features will make it right at home in many pro, advanced hobbyist or weekend warror kits as a primary or backup camera. For what you get, the Sony a7 III is a bargain.
 
Relevant Info
 
Posted to: Sony News
Post Date: 8/17/2018 7:48:01 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, May 22, 2018
For those shopping for their first non-smartphone camera, a backup camera for a current kit or simply upgrading from a lower level/previous generation Rebel-series camera, the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and EOS M50 are likely to be considered. Today, we're going to look closely at these two cameras to see which might be the better option for addition to your kit.
 
Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and EOS M50 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Resolution: 24 MP / 6000 x 4000 pixels
  • Crop Ratio: 1.6x
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF, up to 1080p 59.94 fps
  • Shutter Speed: 30 - 1/4000 sec.
  • Auto White Balance with Ambience priority / White priority
  • Wi-Fi, NFC & Bluetooth
  • 3" (7.7/7.5cm) Vari-angle Touchscreen LCD, 1040K dots
  • Flash X-sync: 1/200 sec.
  • SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS-I compatible)
  • Similar Price (at US authorized retailers, excluding rebates)
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D:
 
  • Native compatibility with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses
  • More Sensitive AF: down to EV -3 vs. EV -2
  • Larger Buffer: Up to 27 RAW/unlimited JPEG vs. 10/33
  • Wider Exposure Compensation Range: +/-5 EV vs. +/-3 EV
  • Large Auto ISO Range: 100 - 25600 vs. 100 - 6400
  • Higher Power Flash: 13.1 GN vs. 5
  • Optical Viewfinder
  • Longer Battery Life: 820 shots vs. 235 (370 in Eco Mode)
  • Compatible with E3-type remotes, smartphones/tablets and BR-E1 (Bluetooth) vs. BR-E1 and smartphones/tablets only
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • Native compatibility with EF-M lenses, compatible with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses via adapter
  • Newer Processor: DIGIC 8 vs. DIGIC 7
  • More AF Points: 143 vs. 45
  • Faster Burst Rate: Approx 10.0 fps RAW (7.4 with Servo AF) vs. 6
  • Better Face Detection: Eye AF vs. Face AF
  • Wider Metering Range: EV 0 – 20 vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Higher Resolution Video: 4K UHD vs. FHD 1080p
  • Electronic Viewfinder
  • Smaller: 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.3" (116.3 x 88.1 x 58.7mm) vs. 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm)
  • Lighter: 13.7 oz (387g) vs. 18.77 oz (532g)
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D?
 
If you are a current Rebel-series owner but want the benefits of a Dual Pixel CMOS sensor, and the size and weight of your current kit is a non-issue, then the EOS Rebel T7i/800D will offer a seamless transition with no adapters required to use your current set of lenses and a familiar button/control layout that feels right at home in your hands. With no adapter required for use with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses, there's one less vital piece of gear to be forgotten or malfunction. Just remember your fully charged battery and a memory card, throw your lenses in a bag and you're good to go (although we do recommend packing other items as well).
 
Note that the T7i has an optical viewfinder (OVF) while the EOS M5 has an electronic viewfinder (EVF), and both show up as advantages for their respective cameras. Depending on what you're shooting and what your preferences are, either one may be more beneficial than the other. Check out our OVF vs. EVF comparison here.
 
If you're interested in exploring off-camera lighting, the Rebel T7i offers an integrated Speedlite transmitter that will allow you to control off-camera Canon Speedlites remotely. To get the same functionality with the EOS M50, you would need a master flash (600EX II-RT / 430EX III-RT) or ST-E3-RT / ST-E2 transmitter, reducing the mirrorless camera's size/weight benefits.
 
The Rebel T7i's more sensitive AF system is able to lock on in lower light, and its battery will keep you shooting long after the EOS M50's battery has been exhausted.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
The EOS M50 represents a huge step up in image quality for those coming directly from a smartphone, and its size and weight will provide an easier transition into ILC (Interchangeable Lens Camera) photography compared to a traditional DSLR body. The EOS M50 will also be a great choice for current Canon DSLR owners who want a compact option that can also serve as a backup camera in a pinch (with the adapter) or otherwise want a reduced load for vacations, hiking or business trips, especially when one of Canon's EF-M series lenses will fit the bill perfectly.
 
Want to capture 4K video? The M50 has you covered (albeit without the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS AF). If 1080p output is your goal, you can easily downsample 4K video (with very slight cropping on the right and left sides), crop the frame to provide a tighter angle of view, or even pan your FHD video within the confines of the 4K captured frame. You can also mimic zooming in and out of a scene to add even more production value to your 1080p movies. When not utilizing 4K capture, the M50 offers similar benefits as the Rebel T7i, including DPAF subject tracking.
 
On top of the size and weight advantages of an M-series kit, the M50's faster burst rate in single shot mode can help you capture the peak action as long as AF tracking is not needed for the specific situation. And if you prefer the benefits of an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder), then the M5 becomes the easy choice.
 
Summary
 
While the EOS M50 is a moderately capable camera with the size and weight benefits a mirrorless system brings, Canon's current [limited] EF-M lens selection may not provide all the flexibility desired in an ILC kit. And while Canon's complete EF/EF-S/TS-E/MP-E lenses can be used with an adapter, using lenses designed for DSLRs on a mirrorless camera negates much of its most alluring quality, its reduced size and weight.
 
On the other hand, the EOS Rebel T7i/800D, with its native ability to mount Canon's full range of EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses, along with its higher battery life and built-in Speedlite transmitter, represents a simpler and more versatile platform on which to build a photography kit.
 
For those general purpose photography situations where a single, variable aperture zoom lens will suffice, the EOS M50 paired with an EF-M zoom lens can be a very convient option that will not be a burden to carry throughout the day. Note that as Canon releases more EF-M lenses, the versatility of an M-series kit increases along with the M50's appeal.
 
More Information:
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/22/2018 11:03:03 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, May 8, 2018
For those shopping for their first non-smartphone camera, a backup camera for a current kit or simply upgrading from a lower level/previous generation Rebel-series camera, the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and EOS M5 are likely to be considered. Today, we're going to look closely at these two cameras to see which might be the better option for acquisition.
 
Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and EOS M5 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Resolution: 24.2 MP / 6000 x 4000 pixels
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF, up to 1080p 59.94 fps
  • HDMI out & external mic jack
  • Crop Ratio: 1.6x
  • Processor: DIGIC 7
  • Metering Range: EV 1 – 20
  • Auto ISO Range: 100 - 25600
  • Shutter Speed: 30 - 1/4000 sec
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, NFC and Low-Energy Bluetooth
  • Flash hot shoe
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D:
 
  • Natively compatible with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses
  • AF Working Range: EV -3 - 18 vs. EV -1 - 18
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-5 EV vs. +/-3 EV
  • Higher Max ISO: 51200 vs. 25600
  • Vari-angle LCD screen vs. tilt only
  • Ambience priority, white priority AWB vs. ambience only
  • More Powerful Pop-up Flash: 13.1 GN (m) vs. 5
  • Integrated Speedlite Transmitter vs. N/A
  • Longer Battery Life: 820 shots vs. 295 (420 with Eco Mode On)
  • Larger, more comfortable grip size
  • Optical viewfinder
  • Lower cost
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M5:
 
  • Native EF-M lenses are smaller/lighter than similar EF-S/EF lenses
  • Compatible with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses via adapter
  • More AF points: 49 vs. 45
  • Focus peaking vs. N/A
  • Faster Continuous Shooting: approx. 9 fps (7fps with AF) vs. 6
  • Electronic viewfinder
  • Better Viewfinder Coverage: 100% vs. 95%
  • Larger / Higher Resolution LCD: 8.0 cm (3.2”), 1,620 K dots vs. 7.7 cm (3.0"), 1040 K dots
  • Smaller Size: 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.4" vs. 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (115.6 x 89.2 x 60.6mm vs. 131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm)
  • Lighter Weight: 15.1 oz. vs. 18.77 oz (427g vs. 532g)
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D?
 
If you are a current Rebel-series owner but simply long for the benefits of a Dual Pixel CMOS sensor, and the size and weight of your current kit is a non-issue, then the EOS Rebel T7i/800D will offer a seamless transition with no adapters required to use your current set of lenses and a familiar button/control layout that feels right at home in your hands. With no adapter required, there's one less vital piece of gear to be forgotten or malfunction. Just remember your fully charged battery and a memory card, throw your lenses in a bag and you're good to go (although we do recommend packing other items as well).
 
Note that the T7i has an optical viewfinder (OVF) while the EOS M5 has an electronic viewfinder (EVF), and both show up as advantages for their respective cameras. Depending on what you're shooting and what your preferences are, either one may be more beneficial than the other. Check out our OVF vs. EVF comparison here.
 
If you're interested in exploring off-camera lighting, the Rebel T7i offers an integrated Speedlite transmitter that will allow you to control off-camera Canon Speedlites remotely. The Rebel T7i's more sensitive AF system is able to lock on in lower light, and its battery will keep you shooting long after the EOS M5's battery has been exhausted. And if you're on a tight budget, the Rebel T7's lower price tag will make it an even more attractive option.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M5?
 
The EOS M5 represents a huge step up in image quality for those coming directly from a smartphone, and its size and weight will provide an easier transition into ILC (Interchangeable Lens Camera) photography compared to a traditional DSLR body. The EOS M5 will also be a great choice for current Canon DSLR owners who want a compact option that can also serve as a backup camera in a pinch (with the adapter) or otherwise want a reduced load for vacations, hiking or business trips, especially when one of Canon's EF-M series lenses will fit the bill perfectly..
 
On top of the size and weight advantages of an M-series kit, the M5's faster burst rate in single shot mode can help you capture the peak action as long as AF tracking is not needed for the specific situation. And if you prefer the benefits of an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder), then the M5 becomes the easy choice.
 
Summary
 
While the EOS M5 is a very capable camera with the size and weight benefits a mirrorless system brings, Canon's current [limited] EF-M lens selection may not provide all the flexibility desired in an ILC kit. And while Canon's complete EF/EF-S/TS-E/MP-E lenses can be used with an adapter, using lenses designed for DSLRs on a mirrorless camera negates much of its most alluring quality, its reduced size and weight.
 
On the other hand, the EOS Rebel T7i/800D, with its native ability to mount Canon's full range of EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses, along with its higher battery life and built-in Speedlite transmitter, represents a simpler and more versatile platform on which to build a photography kit.
 
For those general purpose photography situations where a single, variable aperture zoom lens will suffice, the EOS M5 paired with an EF-M zoom lens can be a very convient option that will not be a burden to carry throughout the day. Note that as Canon releases more EF-M lenses, the versatility of an M-series kit increases along with the M5's appeal.
 
More Information:
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/8/2018 7:53:24 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, May 1, 2018
Want great image quality but don't want to carry around a full-sized DSLR? Canon's EOS M50 and EOS Rebel SL2/200D are two options you may have been considering. If so, let's take a look at these two cameras to see how they compare.
 
Canon EOS M50 and EOS Rebel SL2/200D Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing: 3 shots, +/- 2 EV, 1/3-stop increment
  • Shutter Speed: 1/4000 sec. to 30 sec.
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • DIGIC 8 processor vs. DIGIC 7
  • Up to 143 AF points vs. 9
  • EV -2 – 18 AF working range vs. EV -0.5 -18
  • Up to 10 fps burst shooting for 10 frames RAW vs. 5 fps for 6 frames RAW
  • 384 zone metering sensor vs. 63
  • EV 0 – 20 metering range vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Up to 4K video recording vs. Full HD 1080p
  • 100% viewfinder coverage vs. 95%
  • 15mm built-in flash coverage vs. 18mm
  • Smaller/lighter: 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.3" (116.3 x 88.1 x 58.7mm), 13.7 oz (387g) vs. 4.82 x 3.65 x 2.75" (122.4 x 92.6 x 69.8mm), 15.98 oz (453g)
  • .CR3 RAW files with C-RAW support vs. .CR2 with no C-RAW support
  • Native compatibility with EF-M lenses, compatible with EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E with adapter
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel SL2/200D:
 
  • +/-5 EV Exposure Compensation vs. +/-3 EV
  • 100-25600 Auto ISO range vs. 100-6400
  • White balance bracketing vs. N/A
  • 9.8m built-in flash GN vs. 5
  • 650 battery life vs. 235 (370 in Eco Mode)
  • Compatible with Remote Controller BR-E1 & E3 remotes vs. Remote Controller BR-E1 only
  • Native compatibility with EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses
  • Lower price
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
Those wanting the smallest and lightest camera option, especially for backpacking or family vacations, Canon's mirrorless cameras pack DSLR-level image quality in a take-anywhere size. That the EOS M50 is compatible with Canon's similarly-small EF-M series lenses further bolsters this advantage. And while the M50 is technically more versatile from a lens options standpoint when the EF-EOS M Adapter is factored into the equation, use of the adapter with designed-for-DSLR lenses negates much of the small size and light weight benefits of an M50-based kit.
 
If you need a camera that shoots 4K, then the choice is easy – the EOS M50 shoots 4k, the EOS Rebel SL2/200D does not. Although you don't get the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS Movie Servo AF in 4K mode, the ability to shoot 4K combined with the M50's vari-angle LCD and small size/weight will make it an extremely useful tool for filmmaking, especially for vloggers or one-man crews. If you appreciate the benefits of an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder), then the EOS M50 becomes the de facto option. However, note that I didn't list an EVF as a benefit for the EOS M50 nor did I list the OVF (Optical Viewfinder) as a benefit for the Rebel SL2/200D. Your own personal preferences and specific needs will dictate which viewfinder is most advantageous. Check out our article "Comparing Electronic Viewfinders to Optical Viewfinders" for more information. The EOS M50 also features a better/more sensitive AF system, more sensitive metering system, a faster continuous shooting burst rate and a larger buffer.
 
These features along with the camera's new .CR3 RAW file format (with space saving C-RAW support) result in an overall more versatile camera compared to the EOS Rebel SL2/200D.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel SL2/200D?
 
For those who tend to occasionally forget to pack important items in their gear bag, an advantage of the SL2/200D is its native compatibility with all of Canon's EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses (no adapter required). Those needing to control larger lenses on their camera and those actively using the camera for substantial time periods will appreciate the SL2/200D's more substantial grip and longer battery life. The Rebel SL2/200D's larger exposure compensation range can certainly come in handy under extreme exposure conditions.
 
The Rebel SL2 has one particular advantage that nearly every photographer can appreciate – a lower price tag compared to the M50.
 
More Information:
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/1/2018 10:37:53 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, April 13, 2018
The Canon EOS M50 and EOS M100 cameras represent the budget options in Canon's mirrorless lineup, but the "budget" label is a relative one because – as Canon's naming conventions suggest – these cameras are not on the same level. Typically speaking, Canon camera models with more numerical digits in their name are positioned lower in the camera lineup than cameras with fewer digits. In this case, the naming convention holds true. The EOS M50 has several features not included in the M100, the most notable of which is an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder). The big question becomes, are the M50's features worth spending more for?
 
Let's take a look at how the EOS M50 and EOS M100 compare to find out which camera might be the best for your specific needs.
 
Canon EOS M50 and M100 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor*
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Crop Factor: 1.6x (APS-C sensor)
  • Native EF-M Lens Support (compatible with EF/EF-S/TS-E/MP-E with EF-EOS M Adapter)
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-3 EV in 1/3 stop increments
  • Shutter Speed Range: 30-1/4000 sec in 1/3 stop increments
  • LCD: 7.5 cm (3.0”) Touchscreen (TFT). 3:2 aspect ratio. Approx. 1,040,000 dots
  • Built-in Flash GN: 5
  • Flash x-Sync: 1/200 sec.
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC
  • My Menu (customizable menu) vs. none
  • Operating Environment: 32–104°F / 0–40°C
* Dual Pixel CMOS sensor AF benefits unavailable during 4K recording (M50).
 
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • Electronic Viewfinder + LCD vs. LCD only
  • DIGIC 8 processor vs. DIGIC 7
  • 143 AF points vs. 49
  • EV -2 – 18 AF working range vs. EV -1 – 18
  • EV 0 – 20 metering range vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Auto exposure bracketing vs. none
  • Ambience/white priority AWB vs. ambience only
  • Vari-angle LCD vs. tiltable 180 degrees up
  • Flash recycling time: 3 sec. vs. 5
  • Flash hot shoe vs. none
  • Adobe RGB and sRGB color spaces vs. sRGB only
  • 10 fps One Shot/7.4 fps Servo AF continuous shooting vs. 6.1 / 4
  • .CR3 File Format with C-RAW vs. .CR2 (no C-RAW support)
  • Up to 4K UHD video recording vs. Full HD 1080p
  • Compatible with Bluetooth BR-E1 / mobile device remote control vs. mobile device only
  • 9 customizable buttons vs. 2
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M100:
 
  • 100-25600 Auto ISO range vs. 100 - 6400
  • 21 shot RAW buffer in One Shot Mode vs. 10
  • Approx. 295 shots (410 shots in Eco Mode) battery life vs. 235 (370)
  • Smaller/Lighter: 4.26 x 2.64 x 1.38" (108.2 x 67.1 x 35.1mm), 11.29oz (320g) vs. 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.3" (116.3 x 88.1 x 58.7mm), 13.7 oz (387g)
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
If you need a versatile, mirrorless camera and would like to shoot 4K, then the choice is easy – get an EOS M50. It's the only Canon mirrorless option (at the moment) that can record 4K video. Although you don't get the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS Movie Servo AF in 4K mode, the ability to shoot 4K combined with the M50's vari-angle LCD and small size/weight will make it an extremely useful tool for filmmaking, especially for vloggers or one-man crews. For those who prefer viewfinder shooting, once again, the choice is easy. The M50's OLED EVF is well designed and makes it much easier to use when shooting in bright sunlight. The EOS M50 also features a flash hot shoe, better/more sensitive AF system, more sensitive metering system, a faster continuous shooting burst rate, exposure bracketing and more AWB options. These features along with the camera's new .CR3 RAW file format (with space saving C-RAW support) result in a camera that is simply more capable of capturing compelling imagery compared to the EOS M100.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M100?
 
Of the limited number of advantages the EOS M100 has over the M50, the two which will likely prove most compelling for most will be its lower cost and smaller size/lighter weight. If your budget does not extend to the M50, you need the absolute smallest and lightest Canon mirrorless option available or you don't anticipate utilizing the M50's extra features, the M100 is there for you.
 
Relevant Information
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/13/2018 11:33:59 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, April 11, 2018
In February 2017, Canon announced the EOS M6. One year later, Canon announced the M50, a similar camera with a feature many M6 customers craved – 4K video recording. Even though the M50 is positioned lower than the M6 in Canon's M-series lineup, you might be surprised to see just how close these cameras are to one another.
 
Let's look at these two mirrorless camera offerings from Canon to see which might represent the best camera for your kit.
 
Canon EOS M6 and M50 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor*
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Crop Factor: 1.6x (APS-C sensor)
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-3 EV in 1/3 stop increments
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB): 3 shots, +/- 2 EV, 1/3-stop increments
  • Shutter Speed Range: 30 - 1/4000 sec (1/3 stop increments)
  • 7.5 cm (3.0”) touchscreen LCD (TFT), approx. 1,040,000 dots.
  • Flash x-sync: 1/200 sec
  • Pop-up Flash: GN 5, 15mm coverage
  • Memory Card Support: SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS-I compatible)
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC
* Dual Pixel CMOS sensor AF benefits unavailable during 4K recording (M50).
 
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M6:
 
  • Larger Auto ISO Range: 100 - 25600 vs. 100 - 6400
  • Larger RAW Buffer: 17 vs. 10
  • More Customization Options: 13 customizable buttons/dials vs. 9
  • Rear control dial vs. cross keys
  • Longer Battery Life: approx. 295 shots (425 shots with Eco Mode On) vs. Approx. 235 shots (370 shots with Eco Mode On)
  • Smaller Size: 4.4 x 2.7 x 1.8" (112.0 x 68.0 x 44.5mm) vs. 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.3" (116.3 x 88.1 x 58.7mm)
  • Compatible with E3, infrared and Bluetooth remotes vs. Bluetooth only
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • New Image Processor: DIGIC 8 vs. DIGIC 7
  • More AF Points: max 143 vs. 49
  • More Sensitive AF: EV -2 – 18 vs. EV -1 – 18
  • Built-in Electronic Viewfinder, 0.39-type OLED electronic viewfinder, approx. 2,360,000 dots vs. optional EVF (EVF-DC1 / EVF-DC2)
  • Expanded AF Area: max 88% x 100% (W x H) sensor coverage vs. 80% x 80%
  • Better Face Tracking AF: eye detection vs. standard face tracking
  • Larger Metering Range: EV 0 – 20 vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Higher Resolution Video: 3840 x 2160 (4K UHD, 23.98 fps) / 1920 x 1080 (Full HD, 59.94 fps) vs. 1920 x 1080 (Full HD, 59.94 fps) only
  • More White Balance Options: ambience/white priority vs. ambience only
  • Faster Continuous Shooting: 10 fps (7.4 fps with Servo AF) vs. 9 (7 with Servo AF)
  • Vari-angle LCD vs. tilting only
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M6?
 
Like the EOS M5 vs. M50 Comparison, the feature gap between the EOS M6 and the EOS M50 is quite narrow, relatively speaking.
 
If you're a seasoned photographer who appreciates having a myriad of easily accessible controls, then the M6's Exposure Compensation, Quick Control and Rear Control Dials could tip the balance in its favor. To see what I mean, flip between the two cameras in our Camera Top View Comparison. The two most prominent M6 features you'll likely notice are the Exposure Compensation and Quick Control dials, both of which are missing on the M50. Also absent on the M50 are the M6's custom shooting modes, located on the Mode Dial.
 
Every photographer will benefit from the M6's longer battery life. Many will also appreciate the M6's larger RAW buffer and plentiful remote options.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
If you prefer shooting with a viewfinder as opposed to framing your scene via the camera's LCD screen (or purchasing an optional viewfinder accessory which renders the camera's hot shoe unusable), then the EOS M50 is your camera. The M50's feature set will make it especially handy for vacations, social gatherings and general purpose photography and videography. With its advanced and more sensitive AF system, capturing in-focus images of human subjects – even in low light – will be easier. Although you don't get the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS Movie Servo AF in 4K mode, the ability to shoot 4K combined with the M50's vari-angle LCD and small size/weight will make it an extremely useful tool for filmmaking, especially for vloggers or one-man crews. If outputting to 1080p video, set a tripod-mounted M50 to record 4K video and then pan around the frame in post for high quality b-roll, or otherwise reap the benefits of automatic and smooth Dual Pixel Movie Servo AF when recording 1080p video (the latter benefit is identical to the M6).
 
Summary
 
As we mentioned in the beginning of this comparison, these cameras are very similar. While their names may suggest a clear hierarchy, the cameras' feature sets belie simplistic categorization. Both cameras will likely serve most interested consumers very well, with the handful of differences above – and the benefits they bring to select shooting conditions – will ultimately determine which camera fits one's needs best.
 
Relevant Information
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/11/2018 7:45:45 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, March 30, 2018
If you're ready to step up from smartphone photography to one of Canon's entry-level DSLRs, you may be asking yourself "Which might be a better option for me? The Canon EOS Rebel T7i or the Rebel T7?"
 
If so, you're in luck. Today we're going to take a close look at these two Canon Rebel cameras to see which might be the better fit for your needs. First, let's take a look at what they have in common.
 
Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and Rebel T7/2000D Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Crop Factor: 1.6x (APS-C sensor)
  • Metering Range: EV 1 – 20
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-5 EV in 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments
  • Shutter Speed: 30-1/4000 sec
  • Flash x-sync: 1/200 sec
  • Viewfinder: pentamirror, 95% coverage
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and NFC
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D:
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor vs. traditional CMOS sensor
  • Better Image Processor: DIGIC 7 vs. DIGIC 4+
  • Better AF System: 45 cross-type AF points (45 f/5.6 cross-type AF points, 27 f/8 points [9 cross-type], center point is f/2.8 and f/5.6 dual cross-type) vs. 9 AF points (f/5.6 cross type at center)
  • Focuses in Lower Light: EV -3 - 18 (at 23 °C & ISO 100) vs. EV 0 -18 (center point), EV 1 -18 (outer points)
  • Better Metering: 7560-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor, metering with the area divided into 63 segments (9 × 7) [Evaluative, Partial, Center-weighted and Spot] vs. TTL full aperture metering with 63-zone SPC [Evaluative, Partial and Center-weighted]
  • More Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB) Options: 2, 3, 5 or 7 Shots +/-3 EV 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments vs. 3 shots +/- 2 EV, 1/2 or 1/3-stop increments
  • Greater ISO Range: ISO AUTO (100 - 25600), 100 - 25600 (H1: 51200) in 1 stop increments vs. AUTO (100-6400), 100-6400 (H: 12800) in 1-stop increments
  • Custom, Color Temperature White Balance Setting vs. none
  • Higher Pop-up Flash Guide Number: 13.1 (ISO 100, meters) vs. 9.2
  • Peripheral illumination, chromatic aberration, distortion and diffraction correction vs. peripheral illumination correction only
  • Higher Burst Rage with Larger Buffer: max. approx. 6 fps for 27 RAW images vs. 3 fps for 11 RAW
  • Higher Framerate Full HD Video: 1080p video at 60 fps vs. 1080p video at 30 fps
  • Low-energy Bluetooth vs. none
  • More Custom Functions: 15 custom functions with 44 settings vs. 11 custom functions with 33 settings
  • External 3.5mm microphone port vs. none
  • Compatible with Faster Memory Cards: supports SDXC (UHS-I) vs. SDXC
  • Better Battery Life: approx. 820 shots vs. 500
  • Compatible with More Remotes: E3 (corded), infrared (RC-series) & Bluetooth vs. E3 only
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D
 
  • Smaller Size: 5.08 x 3.99 x 3.06" (129.0 x 101.3 x 77.6mm) vs. 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm)
  • Lighter Weight: 16.75 oz (475g) vs. 18.77 oz (532g)
  • Lower cost
If you glance at the specifications comparison found on this site, you'll likely notice that the Rebel T7 features a faster pop-up flash recycling time compared to the Rebel T7i (2 sec vs. 3 sec), which would seem to indicate an advantage. However, the T7 has a faster recycling time because it has a lower power flash. When fired at the T7's full power level, the T7i's recycling time will likely be similar.
 
Who Should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D?
 
When describing the customers who may be best served by the cameras in one of our comparisons, we typically start with the higher-end option as its versatility will make it an overall better option for most consumers. In this case, the feature difference between the cameras is so substantial and the advantages so one-sided that there is really only one reason to choose the Canon EOS Rebel T7 over the Rebel T7i – a lower price tag.
 
The Rebel T7i's Dual Pixel CMOS AF sensor, more advanced/sensitive AF system, higher burst rate/larger buffer and longer battery life could all be considered justification for the camera's higher price tag when considered individually. Put all those features together and the value you receive for the T7i's incremental price over the T7 is monumental.
 
Who Should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D?
 
As previously mentioned, the primary reason to opt for the EOS Rebel T7/2000D is for its lower cost. The Rebel T7 will be more than adequate for capturing high quality imagery under normal / not-so-challenging conditions, and those stepping up from smartphone photography will certainly appreciate the benefits of a significantly larger sensor and the ability to change lenses. And speaking of lenses, for the price of a Rebel T7i + EF-S 18-55 IS STM kit, you could get a Rebel T7 + EF-S 18-55 IS II, EF 50mm f/1.8 STM and EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM lens.
 
Beginner/novice photographers aren't the only groups that will appreciate the Rebel T7's lower price tag. Advanced photographers wanting to capture images in high-risk-of-damage situations can more easily justify the sacrificial cost of a Rebel T7. Such photographers can mount the T7 to a car, motorcycle, bicycle, boat, etc. to capture dynamic imagery without risking damage to their primary camera(s).
 
Summary
 
Few camera comparisons are a clear-cut as this one. The Canon EOS Rebel T7i's superset of features will make it a more versatile imaging platform for those who can afford its price difference over the Rebel T7. But for those whose budgets don't extend that far, especially beginner/novice photographers, the Rebel T7 offers a solid step-up for those currently shooting with smartphones and/or point-and-shoot cameras who want to experience the benefits of interchangeable lens camera photography first-hand.
 
Relevant Info
 
The Canon USA Store is the exclusive North American retailer of the Canon EOS Rebel T7 (so far). The Canon EOS Rebel T7i can be found at B&H | Adorama | Amazon (for more retail links, see the bottom of the T7i Review).
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/30/2018 10:37:45 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, March 6, 2018
In September 2016, Canon announced its flagship M-series camera, the M5. Almost 18 months later, Canon announced the M50, a more-similar-than-different camera with a feature many M5 customers craved – 4K video recording. Even though the M50 is positioned lower than the M5 in Canon's M-series lineup, I think you'll be surprised to see just how close these cameras are to one another. Instead of siblings divided by years, they're more like fraternal twins.
 
Let's look at these two mirrorless camera offerings from Canon to see which might represent the best camera for your kit.
 
Canon EOS M5 and M50 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor*
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Crop Factor: 1.6x (APS-C sensor)
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-3 EV in 1/3 stop increments
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB): 3 shots, +/- 2 EV, 1/3-stop increments
  • Shutter Speed Range: 30 - 1/4000 sec (1/3 stop increments)
  • Viewfinder: 0.39-type OLED electronic viewfinder, approx. 2,360,000 dots
  • Flash x-sync: 1/200 sec
  • Pop-up Flash: GN 5, 15mm coverage
  • Memory Card Support: SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS-I compatible)
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC
* Dual Pixel CMOS sensor AF benefits unavailable during 4K recording (M50).
 
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M5:
 
  • Larger Auto ISO Range: 100 - 25600 vs. 100 - 6400
  • Larger RAW Buffer: 17 vs. 10
  • Larger / Higher Resolution LCD Screen: 8.0 cm (3.2”) ClearView II touchscreen LCD (TFT), approx. 1,620,000 dots. vs. 7.5 cm (3.0”) touchscreen LCD (TFT), approx. 1,040,000 dots.
  • More Customization Options: 12 customizable buttons/ dials vs. 9
  • Longer Battery Life: approx. 295 shots (420 shots with Eco Mode On) vs. Approx. 235 shots (370 shots with Eco Mode On)
  • Wider Operating Environment: 14 – 104 °F (-10 – 40 °C) vs. 32 – 104 °F (0 – 40°C)
  • Compatible with E3, infrared and Bluetooth remotes vs. Bluetooth only
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • New Image Processor: DIGIC 8 vs. DIGIC 7
  • More AF Points: max 143 vs. 49
  • More Sensitive AF: EV -2 – 18 vs. EV -1 – 18
  • Expanded AF Area: max 88% x 100% (W x H) sensor coverage vs. 80% x 80%
  • Better Face Tracking AF: eye detection vs. standard face tracking
  • Larger Metering Range: EV 0 – 20 vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Higher Resolution Video: 3840 x 2160 (4K UHD, 23.98 fps) / 1920 x 1080 (Full HD, 59.94 fps) vs. 1920 x 1080 (Full HD, 59.94 fps) only
  • More White Balance Options: ambience/white priority vs. ambience only
  • Faster Continuous Shooting: 10 fps (7.4 fps with Servo AF) vs. 9 (7 with Servo AF)
  • Vari-angle LCD vs. tilting only
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M5?
 
Unlike many of our comparisons, the feature gap between the EOS M5 and the EOS M50 is quite narrow, relatively speaking. However, there are a few differences between the two cameras that may prove pivotal in one's decision making process.
 
If you're a seasoned photographer who appreciates having a myriad of easily accessible controls, then you'll really appreciate the M5's user interface. To see what I mean, flip between the two cameras in our Camera Top View Comparison. The two most prominent M5 features you'll likely notice are the Exposure Compensation and Quick Control dials, both of which are missing on the M50. Also absent on the M50 are the M5's custom shooting modes, located on the Mode Dial.
 
Those shooting in cold conditions will certainly benefit from the M5's wider environmental operating range and longer battery life. Many will appreciate the M5's higher resolution LCD, larger RAW buffer and plentiful remote options.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
In short – everyone else. The M50's feature set will make it especially handy for vacations, social gatherings and general purpose photography and videography. With its advanced and more sensitive AF system, capturing in-focus images of human subjects – even in low light – will be easier than ever so you can focus less on photography and more on the time spent with family and friends. Although you don't get the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS Movie Servo AF in 4K mode, the ability to shoot 4K combined with the M50's vari-angle LCD and small size/weight will make it an extremely useful tool for filmmaking, especially for vloggers or one-man crews. If outputting to 1080p video, set a tripod-mounted M50 to record 4K video and then pan around the frame in post for high quality b-roll, or otherwise reap the benefits of automatic and smooth Dual Pixel Movie Servo AF when recording 1080p video (the latter benefit is identical to the M5).
 
Summary
 
As we mentioned in the beginning of this comparison, these cameras are very similar. While their names may suggest a clear hierarchy, the cameras' feature sets belie simplistic categorization. Both cameras will likely serve most interested consumers very well, with the handful of differences above – and the benefits they bring to select shooting conditions – will ultimately determine which camera fits one's needs best.
 
Relevant Information
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/6/2018 8:22:48 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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