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 Tuesday, May 22, 2018
For those shopping for their first non-smartphone camera, a backup camera for a current kit or simply upgrading from a lower level/previous generation Rebel-series camera, the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and EOS M50 are likely to be considered. Today, we're going to look closely at these two cameras to see which might be the better option for addition to your kit.
 
Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and EOS M50 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Resolution: 24 MP / 6000 x 4000 pixels
  • Crop Ratio: 1.6x
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF, up to 1080p 59.94 fps
  • Shutter Speed: 30 - 1/4000 sec.
  • Auto White Balance with Ambience priority / White priority
  • Wi-Fi, NFC & Bluetooth
  • 3" (7.7/7.5cm) Vari-angle Touchscreen LCD, 1040K dots
  • Flash X-sync: 1/200 sec.
  • SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS-I compatible)
  • Similar Price (at US authorized retailers, excluding rebates)
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D:
 
  • Native compatibility with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses
  • More Sensitive AF: down to EV -3 vs. EV -2
  • Larger Buffer: Up to 27 RAW/unlimited JPEG vs. 10/33
  • Wider Exposure Compensation Range: +/-5 EV vs. +/-3 EV
  • Large Auto ISO Range: 100 - 25600 vs. 100 - 6400
  • Higher Power Flash: 13.1 GN vs. 5
  • Optical Viewfinder
  • Longer Battery Life: 820 shots vs. 235 (370 in Eco Mode)
  • Compatible with E3-type remotes, smartphones/tablets and BR-E1 (Bluetooth) vs. BR-E1 and smartphones/tablets only
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • Native compatibility with EF-M lenses, compatible with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses via adapter
  • Newer Processor: DIGIC 8 vs. DIGIC 7
  • More AF Points: 143 vs. 45
  • Faster Burst Rate: Approx 10.0 fps RAW (7.4 with Servo AF) vs. 6
  • Better Face Detection: Eye AF vs. Face AF
  • Wider Metering Range: EV 0 – 20 vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Higher Resolution Video: 4K UHD vs. FHD 1080p
  • Electronic Viewfinder
  • Smaller: 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.3" (116.3 x 88.1 x 58.7mm) vs. 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm)
  • Lighter: 13.7 oz (387g) vs. 18.77 oz (532g)
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D?
 
If you are a current Rebel-series owner but want the benefits of a Dual Pixel CMOS sensor, and the size and weight of your current kit is a non-issue, then the EOS Rebel T7i/800D will offer a seamless transition with no adapters required to use your current set of lenses and a familiar button/control layout that feels right at home in your hands. With no adapter required for use with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses, there's one less vital piece of gear to be forgotten or malfunction. Just remember your fully charged battery and a memory card, throw your lenses in a bag and you're good to go (although we do recommend packing other items as well).
 
Note that the T7i has an optical viewfinder (OVF) while the EOS M5 has an electronic viewfinder (EVF), and both show up as advantages for their respective cameras. Depending on what you're shooting and what your preferences are, either one may be more beneficial than the other. Check out our OVF vs. EVF comparison here.
 
If you're interested in exploring off-camera lighting, the Rebel T7i offers an integrated Speedlite transmitter that will allow you to control off-camera Canon Speedlites remotely. To get the same functionality with the EOS M50, you would need a master flash (600EX II-RT / 430EX III-RT) or ST-E3-RT / ST-E2 transmitter, reducing the mirrorless camera's size/weight benefits.
 
The Rebel T7i's more sensitive AF system is able to lock on in lower light, and its battery will keep you shooting long after the EOS M50's battery has been exhausted.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
The EOS M50 represents a huge step up in image quality for those coming directly from a smartphone, and its size and weight will provide an easier transition into ILC (Interchangeable Lens Camera) photography compared to a traditional DSLR body. The EOS M50 will also be a great choice for current Canon DSLR owners who want a compact option that can also serve as a backup camera in a pinch (with the adapter) or otherwise want a reduced load for vacations, hiking or business trips, especially when one of Canon's EF-M series lenses will fit the bill perfectly.
 
Want to capture 4K video? The M50 has you covered (albeit without the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS AF). If 1080p output is your goal, you can easily downsample 4K video (with very slight cropping on the right and left sides), crop the frame to provide a tighter angle of view, or even pan your FHD video within the confines of the 4K captured frame. You can also mimic zooming in and out of a scene to add even more production value to your 1080p movies. When not utilizing 4K capture, the M50 offers similar benefits as the Rebel T7i, including DPAF subject tracking.
 
On top of the size and weight advantages of an M-series kit, the M50's faster burst rate in single shot mode can help you capture the peak action as long as AF tracking is not needed for the specific situation. And if you prefer the benefits of an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder), then the M5 becomes the easy choice.
 
Summary
 
While the EOS M50 is a moderately capable camera with the size and weight benefits a mirrorless system brings, Canon's current [limited] EF-M lens selection may not provide all the flexibility desired in an ILC kit. And while Canon's complete EF/EF-S/TS-E/MP-E lenses can be used with an adapter, using lenses designed for DSLRs on a mirrorless camera negates much of its most alluring quality, its reduced size and weight.
 
On the other hand, the EOS Rebel T7i/800D, with its native ability to mount Canon's full range of EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses, along with its higher battery life and built-in Speedlite transmitter, represents a simpler and more versatile platform on which to build a photography kit.
 
For those general purpose photography situations where a single, variable aperture zoom lens will suffice, the EOS M50 paired with an EF-M zoom lens can be a very convient option that will not be a burden to carry throughout the day. Note that as Canon releases more EF-M lenses, the versatility of an M-series kit increases along with the M50's appeal.
 
More Information:
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/22/2018 11:03:03 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, May 8, 2018
For those shopping for their first non-smartphone camera, a backup camera for a current kit or simply upgrading from a lower level/previous generation Rebel-series camera, the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and EOS M5 are likely to be considered. Today, we're going to look closely at these two cameras to see which might be the better option for acquisition.
 
Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and EOS M5 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Resolution: 24.2 MP / 6000 x 4000 pixels
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF, up to 1080p 59.94 fps
  • HDMI out & external mic jack
  • Crop Ratio: 1.6x
  • Processor: DIGIC 7
  • Metering Range: EV 1 – 20
  • Auto ISO Range: 100 - 25600
  • Shutter Speed: 30 - 1/4000 sec
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, NFC and Low-Energy Bluetooth
  • Flash hot shoe
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D:
 
  • Natively compatible with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses
  • AF Working Range: EV -3 - 18 vs. EV -1 - 18
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-5 EV vs. +/-3 EV
  • Higher Max ISO: 51200 vs. 25600
  • Vari-angle LCD screen vs. tilt only
  • Ambience priority, white priority AWB vs. ambience only
  • More Powerful Pop-up Flash: 13.1 GN (m) vs. 5
  • Integrated Speedlite Transmitter vs. N/A
  • Longer Battery Life: 820 shots vs. 295 (420 with Eco Mode On)
  • Larger, more comfortable grip size
  • Optical viewfinder
  • Lower cost
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M5:
 
  • Native EF-M lenses are smaller/lighter than similar EF-S/EF lenses
  • Compatible with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses via adapter
  • More AF points: 49 vs. 45
  • Focus peaking vs. N/A
  • Faster Continuous Shooting: approx. 9 fps (7fps with AF) vs. 6
  • Electronic viewfinder
  • Better Viewfinder Coverage: 100% vs. 95%
  • Larger / Higher Resolution LCD: 8.0 cm (3.2”), 1,620 K dots vs. 7.7 cm (3.0"), 1040 K dots
  • Smaller Size: 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.4" vs. 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (115.6 x 89.2 x 60.6mm vs. 131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm)
  • Lighter Weight: 15.1 oz. vs. 18.77 oz (427g vs. 532g)
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D?
 
If you are a current Rebel-series owner but simply long for the benefits of a Dual Pixel CMOS sensor, and the size and weight of your current kit is a non-issue, then the EOS Rebel T7i/800D will offer a seamless transition with no adapters required to use your current set of lenses and a familiar button/control layout that feels right at home in your hands. With no adapter required, there's one less vital piece of gear to be forgotten or malfunction. Just remember your fully charged battery and a memory card, throw your lenses in a bag and you're good to go (although we do recommend packing other items as well).
 
Note that the T7i has an optical viewfinder (OVF) while the EOS M5 has an electronic viewfinder (EVF), and both show up as advantages for their respective cameras. Depending on what you're shooting and what your preferences are, either one may be more beneficial than the other. Check out our OVF vs. EVF comparison here.
 
If you're interested in exploring off-camera lighting, the Rebel T7i offers an integrated Speedlite transmitter that will allow you to control off-camera Canon Speedlites remotely. The Rebel T7i's more sensitive AF system is able to lock on in lower light, and its battery will keep you shooting long after the EOS M5's battery has been exhausted. And if you're on a tight budget, the Rebel T7's lower price tag will make it an even more attractive option.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M5?
 
The EOS M5 represents a huge step up in image quality for those coming directly from a smartphone, and its size and weight will provide an easier transition into ILC (Interchangeable Lens Camera) photography compared to a traditional DSLR body. The EOS M5 will also be a great choice for current Canon DSLR owners who want a compact option that can also serve as a backup camera in a pinch (with the adapter) or otherwise want a reduced load for vacations, hiking or business trips, especially when one of Canon's EF-M series lenses will fit the bill perfectly..
 
On top of the size and weight advantages of an M-series kit, the M5's faster burst rate in single shot mode can help you capture the peak action as long as AF tracking is not needed for the specific situation. And if you prefer the benefits of an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder), then the M5 becomes the easy choice.
 
Summary
 
While the EOS M5 is a very capable camera with the size and weight benefits a mirrorless system brings, Canon's current [limited] EF-M lens selection may not provide all the flexibility desired in an ILC kit. And while Canon's complete EF/EF-S/TS-E/MP-E lenses can be used with an adapter, using lenses designed for DSLRs on a mirrorless camera negates much of its most alluring quality, its reduced size and weight.
 
On the other hand, the EOS Rebel T7i/800D, with its native ability to mount Canon's full range of EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses, along with its higher battery life and built-in Speedlite transmitter, represents a simpler and more versatile platform on which to build a photography kit.
 
For those general purpose photography situations where a single, variable aperture zoom lens will suffice, the EOS M5 paired with an EF-M zoom lens can be a very convient option that will not be a burden to carry throughout the day. Note that as Canon releases more EF-M lenses, the versatility of an M-series kit increases along with the M5's appeal.
 
More Information:
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/8/2018 7:53:24 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, May 1, 2018
Want great image quality but don't want to carry around a full-sized DSLR? Canon's EOS M50 and EOS Rebel SL2/200D are two options you may have been considering. If so, let's take a look at these two cameras to see how they compare.
 
Canon EOS M50 and EOS Rebel SL2/200D Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing: 3 shots, +/- 2 EV, 1/3-stop increment
  • Shutter Speed: 1/4000 sec. to 30 sec.
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • DIGIC 8 processor vs. DIGIC 7
  • Up to 143 AF points vs. 9
  • EV -2 – 18 AF working range vs. EV -0.5 -18
  • Up to 10 fps burst shooting for 10 frames RAW vs. 5 fps for 6 frames RAW
  • 384 zone metering sensor vs. 63
  • EV 0 – 20 metering range vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Up to 4K video recording vs. Full HD 1080p
  • 100% viewfinder coverage vs. 95%
  • 15mm built-in flash coverage vs. 18mm
  • Smaller/lighter: 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.3" (116.3 x 88.1 x 58.7mm), 13.7 oz (387g) vs. 4.82 x 3.65 x 2.75" (122.4 x 92.6 x 69.8mm), 15.98 oz (453g)
  • .CR3 RAW files with C-RAW support vs. .CR2 with no C-RAW support
  • Native compatibility with EF-M lenses, compatible with EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E with adapter
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel SL2/200D:
 
  • +/-5 EV Exposure Compensation vs. +/-3 EV
  • 100-25600 Auto ISO range vs. 100-6400
  • White balance bracketing vs. N/A
  • 9.8m built-in flash GN vs. 5
  • 650 battery life vs. 235 (370 in Eco Mode)
  • Compatible with Remote Controller BR-E1 & E3 remotes vs. Remote Controller BR-E1 only
  • Native compatibility with EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses
  • Lower price
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
Those wanting the smallest and lightest camera option, especially for backpacking or family vacations, Canon's mirrorless cameras pack DSLR-level image quality in a take-anywhere size. That the EOS M50 is compatible with Canon's similarly-small EF-M series lenses further bolsters this advantage. And while the M50 is technically more versatile from a lens options standpoint when the EF-EOS M Adapter is factored into the equation, use of the adapter with designed-for-DSLR lenses negates much of the small size and light weight benefits of an M50-based kit.
 
If you need a camera that shoots 4K, then the choice is easy – the EOS M50 shoots 4k, the EOS Rebel SL2/200D does not. Although you don't get the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS Movie Servo AF in 4K mode, the ability to shoot 4K combined with the M50's vari-angle LCD and small size/weight will make it an extremely useful tool for filmmaking, especially for vloggers or one-man crews. If you appreciate the benefits of an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder), then the EOS M50 becomes the de facto option. However, note that I didn't list an EVF as a benefit for the EOS M50 nor did I list the OVF (Optical Viewfinder) as a benefit for the Rebel SL2/200D. Your own personal preferences and specific needs will dictate which viewfinder is most advantageous. Check out our article "Comparing Electronic Viewfinders to Optical Viewfinders" for more information. The EOS M50 also features a better/more sensitive AF system, more sensitive metering system, a faster continuous shooting burst rate and a larger buffer.
 
These features along with the camera's new .CR3 RAW file format (with space saving C-RAW support) result in an overall more versatile camera compared to the EOS Rebel SL2/200D.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel SL2/200D?
 
For those who tend to occasionally forget to pack important items in their gear bag, an advantage of the SL2/200D is its native compatibility with all of Canon's EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses (no adapter required). Those needing to control larger lenses on their camera and those actively using the camera for substantial time periods will appreciate the SL2/200D's more substantial grip and longer battery life. The Rebel SL2/200D's larger exposure compensation range can certainly come in handy under extreme exposure conditions.
 
The Rebel SL2 has one particular advantage that nearly every photographer can appreciate – a lower price tag compared to the M50.
 
More Information:
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 5/1/2018 10:37:53 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, April 13, 2018
The Canon EOS M50 and EOS M100 cameras represent the budget options in Canon's mirrorless lineup, but the "budget" label is a relative one because – as Canon's naming conventions suggest – these cameras are not on the same level. Typically speaking, Canon camera models with more numerical digits in their name are positioned lower in the camera lineup than cameras with fewer digits. In this case, the naming convention holds true. The EOS M50 has several features not included in the M100, the most notable of which is an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder). The big question becomes, are the M50's features worth spending more for?
 
Let's take a look at how the EOS M50 and EOS M100 compare to find out which camera might be the best for your specific needs.
 
Canon EOS M50 and M100 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor*
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Crop Factor: 1.6x (APS-C sensor)
  • Native EF-M Lens Support (compatible with EF/EF-S/TS-E/MP-E with EF-EOS M Adapter)
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-3 EV in 1/3 stop increments
  • Shutter Speed Range: 30-1/4000 sec in 1/3 stop increments
  • LCD: 7.5 cm (3.0”) Touchscreen (TFT). 3:2 aspect ratio. Approx. 1,040,000 dots
  • Built-in Flash GN: 5
  • Flash x-Sync: 1/200 sec.
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC
  • My Menu (customizable menu) vs. none
  • Operating Environment: 32–104°F / 0–40°C
* Dual Pixel CMOS sensor AF benefits unavailable during 4K recording (M50).
 
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • Electronic Viewfinder + LCD vs. LCD only
  • DIGIC 8 processor vs. DIGIC 7
  • 143 AF points vs. 49
  • EV -2 – 18 AF working range vs. EV -1 – 18
  • EV 0 – 20 metering range vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Auto exposure bracketing vs. none
  • Ambience/white priority AWB vs. ambience only
  • Vari-angle LCD vs. tiltable 180 degrees up
  • Flash recycling time: 3 sec. vs. 5
  • Flash hot shoe vs. none
  • Adobe RGB and sRGB color spaces vs. sRGB only
  • 10 fps One Shot/7.4 fps Servo AF continuous shooting vs. 6.1 / 4
  • .CR3 File Format with C-RAW vs. .CR2 (no C-RAW support)
  • Up to 4K UHD video recording vs. Full HD 1080p
  • Compatible with Bluetooth BR-E1 / mobile device remote control vs. mobile device only
  • 9 customizable buttons vs. 2
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M100:
 
  • 100-25600 Auto ISO range vs. 100 - 6400
  • 21 shot RAW buffer in One Shot Mode vs. 10
  • Approx. 295 shots (410 shots in Eco Mode) battery life vs. 235 (370)
  • Smaller/Lighter: 4.26 x 2.64 x 1.38" (108.2 x 67.1 x 35.1mm), 11.29oz (320g) vs. 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.3" (116.3 x 88.1 x 58.7mm), 13.7 oz (387g)
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
If you need a versatile, mirrorless camera and would like to shoot 4K, then the choice is easy – get an EOS M50. It's the only Canon mirrorless option (at the moment) that can record 4K video. Although you don't get the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS Movie Servo AF in 4K mode, the ability to shoot 4K combined with the M50's vari-angle LCD and small size/weight will make it an extremely useful tool for filmmaking, especially for vloggers or one-man crews. For those who prefer viewfinder shooting, once again, the choice is easy. The M50's OLED EVF is well designed and makes it much easier to use when shooting in bright sunlight. The EOS M50 also features a flash hot shoe, better/more sensitive AF system, more sensitive metering system, a faster continuous shooting burst rate, exposure bracketing and more AWB options. These features along with the camera's new .CR3 RAW file format (with space saving C-RAW support) result in a camera that is simply more capable of capturing compelling imagery compared to the EOS M100.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M100?
 
Of the limited number of advantages the EOS M100 has over the M50, the two which will likely prove most compelling for most will be its lower cost and smaller size/lighter weight. If your budget does not extend to the M50, you need the absolute smallest and lightest Canon mirrorless option available or you don't anticipate utilizing the M50's extra features, the M100 is there for you.
 
Relevant Information
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/13/2018 11:33:59 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, April 11, 2018
In February 2017, Canon announced the EOS M6. One year later, Canon announced the M50, a similar camera with a feature many M6 customers craved – 4K video recording. Even though the M50 is positioned lower than the M6 in Canon's M-series lineup, you might be surprised to see just how close these cameras are to one another.
 
Let's look at these two mirrorless camera offerings from Canon to see which might represent the best camera for your kit.
 
Canon EOS M6 and M50 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor*
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Crop Factor: 1.6x (APS-C sensor)
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-3 EV in 1/3 stop increments
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB): 3 shots, +/- 2 EV, 1/3-stop increments
  • Shutter Speed Range: 30 - 1/4000 sec (1/3 stop increments)
  • 7.5 cm (3.0”) touchscreen LCD (TFT), approx. 1,040,000 dots.
  • Flash x-sync: 1/200 sec
  • Pop-up Flash: GN 5, 15mm coverage
  • Memory Card Support: SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS-I compatible)
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC
* Dual Pixel CMOS sensor AF benefits unavailable during 4K recording (M50).
 
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M6:
 
  • Larger Auto ISO Range: 100 - 25600 vs. 100 - 6400
  • Larger RAW Buffer: 17 vs. 10
  • More Customization Options: 13 customizable buttons/dials vs. 9
  • Rear control dial vs. cross keys
  • Longer Battery Life: approx. 295 shots (425 shots with Eco Mode On) vs. Approx. 235 shots (370 shots with Eco Mode On)
  • Smaller Size: 4.4 x 2.7 x 1.8" (112.0 x 68.0 x 44.5mm) vs. 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.3" (116.3 x 88.1 x 58.7mm)
  • Compatible with E3, infrared and Bluetooth remotes vs. Bluetooth only
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • New Image Processor: DIGIC 8 vs. DIGIC 7
  • More AF Points: max 143 vs. 49
  • More Sensitive AF: EV -2 – 18 vs. EV -1 – 18
  • Built-in Electronic Viewfinder, 0.39-type OLED electronic viewfinder, approx. 2,360,000 dots vs. optional EVF (EVF-DC1 / EVF-DC2)
  • Expanded AF Area: max 88% x 100% (W x H) sensor coverage vs. 80% x 80%
  • Better Face Tracking AF: eye detection vs. standard face tracking
  • Larger Metering Range: EV 0 – 20 vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Higher Resolution Video: 3840 x 2160 (4K UHD, 23.98 fps) / 1920 x 1080 (Full HD, 59.94 fps) vs. 1920 x 1080 (Full HD, 59.94 fps) only
  • More White Balance Options: ambience/white priority vs. ambience only
  • Faster Continuous Shooting: 10 fps (7.4 fps with Servo AF) vs. 9 (7 with Servo AF)
  • Vari-angle LCD vs. tilting only
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M6?
 
Like the EOS M5 vs. M50 Comparison, the feature gap between the EOS M6 and the EOS M50 is quite narrow, relatively speaking.
 
If you're a seasoned photographer who appreciates having a myriad of easily accessible controls, then the M6's Exposure Compensation, Quick Control and Rear Control Dials could tip the balance in its favor. To see what I mean, flip between the two cameras in our Camera Top View Comparison. The two most prominent M6 features you'll likely notice are the Exposure Compensation and Quick Control dials, both of which are missing on the M50. Also absent on the M50 are the M6's custom shooting modes, located on the Mode Dial.
 
Every photographer will benefit from the M6's longer battery life. Many will also appreciate the M6's larger RAW buffer and plentiful remote options.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
If you prefer shooting with a viewfinder as opposed to framing your scene via the camera's LCD screen (or purchasing an optional viewfinder accessory which renders the camera's hot shoe unusable), then the EOS M50 is your camera. The M50's feature set will make it especially handy for vacations, social gatherings and general purpose photography and videography. With its advanced and more sensitive AF system, capturing in-focus images of human subjects – even in low light – will be easier. Although you don't get the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS Movie Servo AF in 4K mode, the ability to shoot 4K combined with the M50's vari-angle LCD and small size/weight will make it an extremely useful tool for filmmaking, especially for vloggers or one-man crews. If outputting to 1080p video, set a tripod-mounted M50 to record 4K video and then pan around the frame in post for high quality b-roll, or otherwise reap the benefits of automatic and smooth Dual Pixel Movie Servo AF when recording 1080p video (the latter benefit is identical to the M6).
 
Summary
 
As we mentioned in the beginning of this comparison, these cameras are very similar. While their names may suggest a clear hierarchy, the cameras' feature sets belie simplistic categorization. Both cameras will likely serve most interested consumers very well, with the handful of differences above – and the benefits they bring to select shooting conditions – will ultimately determine which camera fits one's needs best.
 
Relevant Information
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/11/2018 7:45:45 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, March 30, 2018
If you're ready to step up from smartphone photography to one of Canon's entry-level DSLRs, you may be asking yourself "Which might be a better option for me? The Canon EOS Rebel T7i or the Rebel T7?"
 
If so, you're in luck. Today we're going to take a close look at these two Canon Rebel cameras to see which might be the better fit for your needs. First, let's take a look at what they have in common.
 
Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and Rebel T7/2000D Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Crop Factor: 1.6x (APS-C sensor)
  • Metering Range: EV 1 – 20
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-5 EV in 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments
  • Shutter Speed: 30-1/4000 sec
  • Flash x-sync: 1/200 sec
  • Viewfinder: pentamirror, 95% coverage
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and NFC
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D:
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor vs. traditional CMOS sensor
  • Better Image Processor: DIGIC 7 vs. DIGIC 4+
  • Better AF System: 45 cross-type AF points (45 f/5.6 cross-type AF points, 27 f/8 points [9 cross-type], center point is f/2.8 and f/5.6 dual cross-type) vs. 9 AF points (f/5.6 cross type at center)
  • Focuses in Lower Light: EV -3 - 18 (at 23 °C & ISO 100) vs. EV 0 -18 (center point), EV 1 -18 (outer points)
  • Better Metering: 7560-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor, metering with the area divided into 63 segments (9 × 7) [Evaluative, Partial, Center-weighted and Spot] vs. TTL full aperture metering with 63-zone SPC [Evaluative, Partial and Center-weighted]
  • More Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB) Options: 2, 3, 5 or 7 Shots +/-3 EV 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments vs. 3 shots +/- 2 EV, 1/2 or 1/3-stop increments
  • Greater ISO Range: ISO AUTO (100 - 25600), 100 - 25600 (H1: 51200) in 1 stop increments vs. AUTO (100-6400), 100-6400 (H: 12800) in 1-stop increments
  • Custom, Color Temperature White Balance Setting vs. none
  • Higher Pop-up Flash Guide Number: 13.1 (ISO 100, meters) vs. 9.2
  • Peripheral illumination, chromatic aberration, distortion and diffraction correction vs. peripheral illumination correction only
  • Higher Burst Rage with Larger Buffer: max. approx. 6 fps for 27 RAW images vs. 3 fps for 11 RAW
  • Higher Framerate Full HD Video: 1080p video at 60 fps vs. 1080p video at 30 fps
  • Low-energy Bluetooth vs. none
  • More Custom Functions: 15 custom functions with 44 settings vs. 11 custom functions with 33 settings
  • External 3.5mm microphone port vs. none
  • Compatible with Faster Memory Cards: supports SDXC (UHS-I) vs. SDXC
  • Better Battery Life: approx. 820 shots vs. 500
  • Compatible with More Remotes: E3 (corded), infrared (RC-series) & Bluetooth vs. E3 only
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D
 
  • Smaller Size: 5.08 x 3.99 x 3.06" (129.0 x 101.3 x 77.6mm) vs. 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm)
  • Lighter Weight: 16.75 oz (475g) vs. 18.77 oz (532g)
  • Lower cost
If you glance at the specifications comparison found on this site, you'll likely notice that the Rebel T7 features a faster pop-up flash recycling time compared to the Rebel T7i (2 sec vs. 3 sec), which would seem to indicate an advantage. However, the T7 has a faster recycling time because it has a lower power flash. When fired at the T7's full power level, the T7i's recycling time will likely be similar.
 
Who Should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D?
 
When describing the customers who may be best served by the cameras in one of our comparisons, we typically start with the higher-end option as its versatility will make it an overall better option for most consumers. In this case, the feature difference between the cameras is so substantial and the advantages so one-sided that there is really only one reason to choose the Canon EOS Rebel T7 over the Rebel T7i – a lower price tag.
 
The Rebel T7i's Dual Pixel CMOS AF sensor, more advanced/sensitive AF system, higher burst rate/larger buffer and longer battery life could all be considered justification for the camera's higher price tag when considered individually. Put all those features together and the value you receive for the T7i's incremental price over the T7 is monumental.
 
Who Should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D?
 
As previously mentioned, the primary reason to opt for the EOS Rebel T7/2000D is for its lower cost. The Rebel T7 will be more than adequate for capturing high quality imagery under normal / not-so-challenging conditions, and those stepping up from smartphone photography will certainly appreciate the benefits of a significantly larger sensor and the ability to change lenses. And speaking of lenses, for the price of a Rebel T7i + EF-S 18-55 IS STM kit, you could get a Rebel T7 + EF-S 18-55 IS II, EF 50mm f/1.8 STM and EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM lens.
 
Beginner/novice photographers aren't the only groups that will appreciate the Rebel T7's lower price tag. Advanced photographers wanting to capture images in high-risk-of-damage situations can more easily justify the sacrificial cost of a Rebel T7. Such photographers can mount the T7 to a car, motorcycle, bicycle, boat, etc. to capture dynamic imagery without risking damage to their primary camera(s).
 
Summary
 
Few camera comparisons are a clear-cut as this one. The Canon EOS Rebel T7i's superset of features will make it a more versatile imaging platform for those who can afford its price difference over the Rebel T7. But for those whose budgets don't extend that far, especially beginner/novice photographers, the Rebel T7 offers a solid step-up for those currently shooting with smartphones and/or point-and-shoot cameras who want to experience the benefits of interchangeable lens camera photography first-hand.
 
Relevant Info
 
The Canon USA Store is the exclusive North American retailer of the Canon EOS Rebel T7 (so far). The Canon EOS Rebel T7i can be found at B&H | Adorama | Amazon (for more retail links, see the bottom of the T7i Review).
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/30/2018 10:37:45 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, March 6, 2018
In September 2016, Canon announced its flagship M-series camera, the M5. Almost 18 months later, Canon announced the M50, a more-similar-than-different camera with a feature many M5 customers craved – 4K video recording. Even though the M50 is positioned lower than the M5 in Canon's M-series lineup, I think you'll be surprised to see just how close these cameras are to one another. Instead of siblings divided by years, they're more like fraternal twins.
 
Let's look at these two mirrorless camera offerings from Canon to see which might represent the best camera for your kit.
 
Canon EOS M5 and M50 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor*
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Crop Factor: 1.6x (APS-C sensor)
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-3 EV in 1/3 stop increments
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB): 3 shots, +/- 2 EV, 1/3-stop increments
  • Shutter Speed Range: 30 - 1/4000 sec (1/3 stop increments)
  • Viewfinder: 0.39-type OLED electronic viewfinder, approx. 2,360,000 dots
  • Flash x-sync: 1/200 sec
  • Pop-up Flash: GN 5, 15mm coverage
  • Memory Card Support: SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS-I compatible)
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC
* Dual Pixel CMOS sensor AF benefits unavailable during 4K recording (M50).
 
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M5:
 
  • Larger Auto ISO Range: 100 - 25600 vs. 100 - 6400
  • Larger RAW Buffer: 17 vs. 10
  • Larger / Higher Resolution LCD Screen: 8.0 cm (3.2”) ClearView II touchscreen LCD (TFT), approx. 1,620,000 dots. vs. 7.5 cm (3.0”) touchscreen LCD (TFT), approx. 1,040,000 dots.
  • More Customization Options: 12 customizable buttons/ dials vs. 9
  • Longer Battery Life: approx. 295 shots (420 shots with Eco Mode On) vs. Approx. 235 shots (370 shots with Eco Mode On)
  • Wider Operating Environment: 14 – 104 °F (-10 – 40 °C) vs. 32 – 104 °F (0 – 40°C)
  • Compatible with E3, infrared and Bluetooth remotes vs. Bluetooth only
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS M50:
 
  • New Image Processor: DIGIC 8 vs. DIGIC 7
  • More AF Points: max 143 vs. 49
  • More Sensitive AF: EV -2 – 18 vs. EV -1 – 18
  • Expanded AF Area: max 88% x 100% (W x H) sensor coverage vs. 80% x 80%
  • Better Face Tracking AF: eye detection vs. standard face tracking
  • Larger Metering Range: EV 0 – 20 vs. EV 1 – 20
  • Higher Resolution Video: 3840 x 2160 (4K UHD, 23.98 fps) / 1920 x 1080 (Full HD, 59.94 fps) vs. 1920 x 1080 (Full HD, 59.94 fps) only
  • More White Balance Options: ambience/white priority vs. ambience only
  • Faster Continuous Shooting: 10 fps (7.4 fps with Servo AF) vs. 9 (7 with Servo AF)
  • Vari-angle LCD vs. tilting only
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M5?
 
Unlike many of our comparisons, the feature gap between the EOS M5 and the EOS M50 is quite narrow, relatively speaking. However, there are a few differences between the two cameras that may prove pivotal in one's decision making process.
 
If you're a seasoned photographer who appreciates having a myriad of easily accessible controls, then you'll really appreciate the M5's user interface. To see what I mean, flip between the two cameras in our Camera Top View Comparison. The two most prominent M5 features you'll likely notice are the Exposure Compensation and Quick Control dials, both of which are missing on the M50. Also absent on the M50 are the M5's custom shooting modes, located on the Mode Dial.
 
Those shooting in cold conditions will certainly benefit from the M5's wider environmental operating range and longer battery life. Many will appreciate the M5's higher resolution LCD, larger RAW buffer and plentiful remote options.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS M50?
 
In short – everyone else. The M50's feature set will make it especially handy for vacations, social gatherings and general purpose photography and videography. With its advanced and more sensitive AF system, capturing in-focus images of human subjects – even in low light – will be easier than ever so you can focus less on photography and more on the time spent with family and friends. Although you don't get the benefits of Dual Pixel CMOS Movie Servo AF in 4K mode, the ability to shoot 4K combined with the M50's vari-angle LCD and small size/weight will make it an extremely useful tool for filmmaking, especially for vloggers or one-man crews. If outputting to 1080p video, set a tripod-mounted M50 to record 4K video and then pan around the frame in post for high quality b-roll, or otherwise reap the benefits of automatic and smooth Dual Pixel Movie Servo AF when recording 1080p video (the latter benefit is identical to the M5).
 
Summary
 
As we mentioned in the beginning of this comparison, these cameras are very similar. While their names may suggest a clear hierarchy, the cameras' feature sets belie simplistic categorization. Both cameras will likely serve most interested consumers very well, with the handful of differences above – and the benefits they bring to select shooting conditions – will ultimately determine which camera fits one's needs best.
 
Relevant Information
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/6/2018 8:22:48 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, January 23, 2018
With the release of the Sony a7R III, many may be wondering how Sony's latest high-resolution full-frame mirrorless camera stacks up against Canon's latest 5-series camera, the EOS 5D Mark IV, and which camera might suit their needs best. So, let's dig into the details and find out.
 
First, let's take a look at some differentiating specifications between the two cameras.
 
Canon EOS 5D Mark IVSony a7R III
Resolution30.442.4
AF TypeTTL secondary image-forming phase-difference detection system with Dual Pixel & AF-dedicated sensorFast Hybrid AF (phase-detection AF/contrast-detection AF)
AF Points61 Point / max of 41 cross-type AF points inc 5 dual cross type at f/2.8 and 61 points / 21 cross-type AF points at f/8399 points (phase-detection AF)
AF Working RangeEV -3 - 18EV -3 - 20
MeteringApprox. 150,000-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor, 252-zone metering.1200-zone evaluative metering
Metering RangeEV 0 - 20EV -3 - 20
Continuous ShootingMax. Approx. 7fps, up to 21 RAWMax Approx. 10 fps, up to 28 Uncompressed RAW
Viewfinder TypePentaprism1.3 cm (0.5-type) electronic viewfinder (color), Quad-VGA OLED
MirrorMotor Driven Quick-return half mirrorN/A
Shutter Durability150,000500,000
In-Body StabilizationN/A5-axis, up to 5.5 stops
4K Video.MOV (MJPEG), 1.74x crop factorXAVC S:MPEG-4, full sensor width
LCDTouch screen 3.2" (8.10cm) Clear View LCD II, approx. 1620K dotTilt type touch screen 1.44m-Dot 2.95 inch (3.0-type) TFT
Wireless FeaturesWi-Fi & NFCWi-Fi, NFC & Bluetooth
GPSYesNo
Battery LifeApprox. 900 shotsApprox. 530 shots (Viewfinder), 650 shots (LCD monitor)
Size5.93 x 4.58 x 2.99" (150.7 x 116.4 x 75.9mm)5.0 x 3.88 x 3.0" (126.9 x 95.6 x 73.7mm)
Weight31.4 oz (890g)23.2 oz (657g)
Memory Card SlotsDual Slots: CompactFlash Type I (UDMA 7 compatible); SD/SDHC/SDXC and UHS-IDual Slots: Memory Stick PRO Duo/PRO HG-Duo/Micro M2, SD/SDHC/SDXC

Looking at the specifications alone, the Sony a7R III appears to one-up the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV in almost every major spec category (differences in memory card formats aside). However, the specifications only tell a part of the story; other factors must be considered before deciding between these two cameras.
 
Size, Weight and Battery Life
 
As indicated by the table above, the Sony a7R III is smaller and lighter than the Canon 5D Mark IV, traits that many will appreciate. But, there are drawbacks to the a7R III's smaller size and lighter weight.
 
The first drawback is that the smaller design leads to a smaller battery, which in turn results in a shorter battery life. The second drawback is that the smaller design can also lead to an uncomfortable grip for those with medium-sized hands (or larger) when using the a7R III with many pro-grade lenses.
 
Sony a9 and Sony FE 70 200mm f 2.8 GM OSS Lens Grip

The Sony a9 is shown above with the Sony FE 70-200mm f/2.8 GM OSS Lens; the grip is nearly identical on the a7R III.
 
The Sony a7R III's smaller size and lighter weight will surely be appreciated by those who must hike significant distances to their desired photo locations. And for those shooting landscapes with a tripod, the comfort of a camera's grip may be a low priority. But for those shooting weddings, festivals or events – situations requiring that the camera be handheld for long periods of time – may appreciate the 5D Mark IV's more comfortable grip as well as its roughly 50% longer battery life.
 
Viewfinders
 
Viewfinder implementations differ significantly between the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and the Sony a7R III, where the Canon body offers a traditional optical viewfinder (with customizable overlays) and the Sony body features an electronic viewfinder. Each type of viewfinder has benefits and drawbacks compared to the other (such as an EVF's elimination of viewfinder blackout times), and Bryan shared his thoughts on the advantages/disadvantages of electronic/optical viewfinders in his article, "Comparing Electronic Viewfinders to Optical Viewfinders". Be sure to check out the preceding information to determine which of these systems you may prefer.
 
Durability & Reliability
 
The time span between Canon's first 5-series camera to its latest iteration, the Mark IV, was 11 years (2005 - 2016). The time span between Sony's first a7R and the introduction of the a7R III was 4 years (2013 - 2017).
 
Canon rates the 5D Mark IV's shutter at 150,000 actuations; Sony claims the a7R III can withstand 500,000 actuations. If both companies are using similar procedures for determining shutter reliability, then Sony's significantly higher shutter rating will be comforting.
 
The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and the Sony a7R III are solidly built and both are billed as "weather resistant" cameras. However, Canon has had significantly more time to refine their camera design for optimal protection from water and dust. We didn't test the thoroughly test the cameras' weather resistance, but we'd personally feel more confident shooting with the 5D Mark IV in adverse conditions.
 
Autofocus Performance
 
Sony's mirrorless cameras' AF performance has dramatically improved over the last couple of years, resulting in the gap between mirrorless and traditional DSLR AF performance quickly diminishing. But while the Sony a7R III focuses faster in one shot mode compared to its predecessor, it still isn't as fast as the 5D Mark IV. That's because the a7R III must defocus in order to obtain focus, causing a noticeable delay even when little has changed in the scene between shutter clicks.
 
In AF tracking mode, both cameras perform similarly well (either in viewfinder mode or LCD/Live View focusing).
 
Menu System
 
Having used Canon cameras for a number of years, we've grown acclimated to Canon's logical, easy to use menu system. Unfortunately, the Sony a7R III menu system seems needlessly complicated with 45 subtabs under the 5 main tabs. That Sony has included a customizable "My Menu" option has helped, allowing for quick access to your most-used menu items. Even so, we still greatly prefer the Canon menu system.
 
Video
 
While both cameras allow for 4K recording at 30p, there are some distinct differences between the cameras' video features. First, the 5D Mark IV records 4K video in .MOV (Motion JPEG) format with a crop factor of 1.74x; the a7R III in XAVC S:MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 using the full senor width (no crop). This difference alone may be the deciding factor between the two cameras if wide angle, 4K video is a top priority for you. The Sony camera is also capable of recording Full HD (1080p) video at 120 fps, while the Canon DSLR tops out at 60 fps.
 
Video shooters will also love the Sony a7R III's built-in 5-axis stabilization, allowing for smoother video recording regardless of the lens that's attached, as well as its tilting LCD screen for odd-angle shooting. The a7R III also features S-LOG 3 and HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma) Picture Profiles, while Canon Log is only available as an add-on (more expensive) upgrade for the 5D mark IV.
 
Customer Support
 
Canon is widely recognized as having an excellent support system, including (not not limited to) Canon Professional Services, the division which specifically caters to those who make a living with their imaging gear. The support we have received from Canon USA and Canon Professional Services has over the years has been very good. Canon USA's Customer Service Technicians have been eager to help and knowledgeable when we have needed phone support, and our experience with Canon's repair department (in the few times we've needed a repair) has been equally satisfying.
 
On the other hand, Sony is still in the building process when it comes to customer support for their E-mount camera system. As such, they don't necessarily have a reputation for exemplary customer service [yet, though things seem to be getting better].
 
Price
 
At the time of this comparison, the Sony a7R III's retail price is roughly $300.00 less expensive than the EOS 5D Mark IV, not counting instant rebates which can make the cameras much closer in price. But when considering the cost of the camera, it's also wise to think about the cost of the whole camera kit you may be considering.
 
Therefore, let's take a look at two comparable kits based on the two cameras.
 
Sony a7R III
Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM
Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8 GM
Sony FE 70-200mm f/2.8 GM OSS
Total MSRP: $10,192.00
 
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV
Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM
Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM
Total MSRP: $9,696.00 ($8,996.00 with current rebates)
 
Of course, MSRP values and the availability (and values) of instant rebates can change over time (possibly changing the advantage), but the above represents a current advantage of the Canon kit. Interesting is that the difference in weight between these two kits is only 9.6 oz (272 g), with the Canon kit being slightly heavier.
 
Wrap Up
 
There's no doubt that you can use either of these cameras in a professional setting to create high quality images or video. If you primarily shoot video, though, the Sony a7R III's advanced video features will likely make it the best overall choice for your needs. And, if you aren't heavily invested in the Canon ecosystem already, choosing the a7R III may make a lot of sense.
 
However, if you already have a decent Canon camera kit and you're not primarily a video shooter, I'm not convinced that the Sony a7R III offers enough advantages over the 5D IV to justify the cost, time and energy of completely switching brands. In which case, the Canon 5D Mark IV would most likely be the better option.
 
Note: Because of the performance limitations experienced when using Canon lenses on Sony cameras (via adapters), we don't consider that to be a viable solution (yet) for most serious photographers.
 
So what are the differentiators that keep you from switching from one of these cameras to the other? Let us know in the comments.
Post Date: 1/23/2018 8:52:26 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, January 4, 2018
With the recent release of the Sony a7R III, many may be wondering, "Should I get the a7R III or get the less expensive a7R II instead?" That's a very fair question, and that's why we're going to be looking at how these two MILCs (Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Cameras) stack up against one another.
 
Sony a7R III and Sony a7R II Shared Primary Features
 
  • 42.4 MP full frame sensor
  • Wi-FI & NFC
  • 399 phase-detection AF
  • EV -3 – EV 20 metering range
  • 30 - 1/8000 sec shutter speed
  • 0.78x viewfinder magnification
  • Up to 4K: 3840 x 2160 30p/100 Mbps video recording
Primary Advantages of the Sony a7R III over the Sony a7R II
 
  • Faster, more accurate AF system with multi-selector joystick for much easier focus point changes
  • 425 contrast AF points vs. 25
  • Up to 10 fps, 28 RAW (Uncompressed) buffer vs. 5 fps, 22 RAW (Uncompressed)
  • ISO 100 - 32,000 (Exp: ISO 50 – 102400) vs. ISO 100 - 25,600 (Exp: ISO 50 – 102400)
  • 3.69m-Dot Quad-VGA Tru-Finder OLED EVF vs. 0.5" 2.36M-Dot XGA OLED Tru-Finder EVF (the III has 1.5x resolution, approx. 2x luminance, 120 fps, 30% faster startup, high quality mode)
  • 3.0" 1.44m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen (limited) LCD vs. 3.0" 1,228.8k-Dot Tilting LCD Monitor
  • Approx. 650 frame battery life (stills, LCD monitor) vs. 340
  • 5.5 stop IBIS vs. 4.5 stops
  • Higher quality full-frame 4K high-sensitivity movies, improved movie AF, Hybrid Log-Gamma, S-Log3, Slow&Quick motion, Photo Capture, Proxy Recording
  • Dual SD memory card slots vs. single SD (III supports high write speeds)
  • Full HD 1080p video at 120 fps vs. 60 fps
  • S-LOG 3 and HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma) Picture Profiles vs. N/A
  • Pixel Shift Multi Shooting vs. N/A
  • USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C port vs. USB 2.0
  • Anti-flicker shutter timing vs. N/A
  • Built-in Bluetooth, Wi-Fi (w/ftp) & NFC vs. Wi-Fi & NFC only
  • Customizable My Menu
  • Improved peaking, Focus magnification with AF support, Rating, Display continuous shooting group
Primary Advantages of the Sony a7R II over the Sony a7R III
 
  • Lower cost
  • Slightly smaller size, lighter weight: 5.0 x 3.8 x 2.4" (126.9 × 95.7 x 60.3mm), 22.0 oz (625g) vs. 5.0 x 3.88 x 3.0" (126.9 x 95.6 x 73.7mm), 23.2 oz (657g)
Who should opt for the Sony a7R III?
 
Those who wish to capture high resolution sports imagery will immediately appreciate the Sony a7R III's twice-as-fast burst rate (10 fps vs. 5), image grouping display, upgraded AF system and [possibly] the new anti-flicker shutter timing (it may work better under some conditions than it worked in our tests). Those using the a7R III for professional filmmaking will likely benefit from the ability to record 1080p video at 120 fps, the upgraded AF, improved peaking and the S-LOG 3 and HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma) Picture Profiles.
 
Wedding photographers will enjoy the added security of the a7R III's dual memory card slots, and sharing images immediately on social media will be made easier with built-in Bluetooth.
 
Regardless of one's specialty, the upgraded IBIS system providing an extra stop of assistance to help keep images sharp will surely be appreciated by almost all photographers. The same sentiment holds true for the a7R III's increased battery life.
 
Who should opt for the Sony a7R II?
 
As is typical of successor vs. predecessor camera comparisons, the primary reason to recommend the purchase of a camera's predecessor – in this case, the Sony a7R II – is the older camera's lower cost. And in this case, the trend continues, with the a7R II weighing in with a 25% discount (with instant rebates) compared to the a7R III.
 
Landscape, architecture/real estate and studio photographers, in particular, who don't necessarily need a better AF system or a faster burst rate, will have fewer reasons to invest in the a7R III's upgraded features as the a7R II's sensor provides similar, high image quality. That said, the brighter viewfinder and longer battery life of the a7R III will be welcomed even by these groups.
 
Relevant Review
 
B&H carries the Sony a7R III and Sony a7R II mirrorless full frame cameras.
Posted to: Sony News
Post Date: 1/4/2018 9:02:41 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, December 6, 2017
If you are a professional, semi-pro or a serious enthusiast photographer who is in the market for a reliable, robust, full-frame Canon camera, the two bodies most likely to be considered are the EOS-1D X Mark II and EOS 5D Mark IV. In this installment of "Which Should I Get?," we'll take a look at these two camera bodies to see which might be the better keystone for your kit.
 
First of all, let's look at a few of the primary specifications that these bodies have in common:
 
Canon EOS-1D X Mark II and EOS 5D Mark IV Shared Primary Features
 
  • Full-frame, Dual Pixel CMOS AF sensor
  • AF system: 61 Point / 41 cross-type AF point including 5 dual cross type at f/2.8 and 61 points / 21 cross-type AF points at f/8
  • AF Working Range: EV -3 - 18
  • Metering Range: EV 0 – 20
  • Ambience & White Priority Auto White Balance
  • 100% viewfinder coverage
  • 3.2" (8.10cm) Clear View LCD II, approx. 1620K dots
  • Up to 4K (Motion JPEG) video recording with 4K frame grab
  • Built-in GPS
Primary advantages of the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II over the EOS 5D Mark IV:
 
  • Dual DIGIC 6+ processors vs. single DIGIC 6+
  • ISO 100-51200, L 50, H1 102400, H2 204800, H3 409600 vs. ISO 100-32000, L 50, H1 51200, H2 102400
  • Approx. 14fps with full AF / AE tracking, speed maintained for up to unlimited number of JPEGs or 170 RAW images (with CFast 2.0 card) vs. approx. 7fps with full AF / AE tracking, speed maintained for up to unlimited number of JPEGs or 21 RAW images
  • Approx. 360,000-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor, 216-zone metering vs. 150,000-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor, 252-zone metering
  • AF point-linked spot metering vs. center-point only spot metering
  • 1/250 sec. max flash x-sync vs. 1/200 sec.
  • 5 Custom White Balance settings can be registered vs. 1 setting
  • 4K video recording max frame rate 59.94 fps vs. 4K video max 29.97 fps
  • Interchangeable focusing screens vs. N/A
  • 34 custom functions vs. 17
  • Sound memos vs. N/A
  • RJ-45 (gigabit Ethernet) port vs. N/A
  • Approx. 1210 frame battery life vs. 900
  • 400,000 shutter durability rating vs. 150,000
  • Better weather sealing
Primary advantages of the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV over the EOS-1D X Mark II:
 
  • 30.4 MP vs. 20.2
  • Smaller & Lighter: 5.93 x 4.58 x 2.99" (150.7 x 116.4 x 75.9mm), 31.4 oz (890g) vs. 6.22 x 6.6 x 3.25" (158.0 x 167.6 x 82.6mm), 53.97 oz (1530g)
  • Full touch-screen LCD interface vs. limited touch-screen
  • Built-in Wi-Fi & NFC vs. N/A (Wi-Fi requires Wireless File Transmitter WFT-E6A, WFT-E8A accessory)
  • Lower price
Who should opt for the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II?
 
If you are a photographer primarily interested in capturing fast-action sports, the EOS-1D X Mark II's blazingly fast 14 fps burst rate and huge 170 frames RAW buffer (in our tests, the buffer was actually only limited to the CFast memory card's capacity) will help you capture the optimal moment(s) when the action is at its peak. And if your sporting event is held in inclement weather, the 1D X II's extra weather sealing will certainly be appreciated.
 
If you're primarily a studio photographer who doesn't need more than roughly 20 MP of resolution, the 1D X II's gigabit Ethernet port is a great asset for tethered shooting.
 
Those using their DSLR to capture video will appreciate the 1D X II's 4K recording at 60 fps, although the larger body may prove cumbersome in some setups. A benefit for some filmmakers (and a drawback for others) is the 1D X II's approximate 1.3x focal length crop factor utilized in 4K video recording allowing for wider angles of view to be captured at the same focal length compared to the 5D Mark IV featuring a 1.74x crop factor.
 
Nearly every photographer can benefit from the 1D X II's higher resolution metering sensor, and AF point-linked Spot metering feature (very helpful) is only available on 1-series bodies. The ability to change focus screens is another benefit of the 1D X II that could prove important for some photographers.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV?
 
If you need more resolution than the EOS-1D X Mark II offers, require built-in Wi-Fi/NFC, prefer a smaller and lighter camera body and/or your budget simply does not extend to the level of a 1-series body, the EOS 5D Mark IV will likely prove to be a great choice.
 
Sharing many important primary features with the EOS-1D X Mark II (with reasonable compromises on others), the EOS 5D Mark IV is the second-most versatile camera Canon has ever produced (the 1D X II being the most versatile). Considering that the 5D Mark IV costs over 40% less than the 1D X II (USA MSRP), those compromises will seem very reasonable for a great number of pro, semi-pro, enthusiast and hobbyist photographers alike.
 
Related Information
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/6/2017 7:45:50 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, August 25, 2017
If interested in purchasing a Canon Rebel-series camera, you may be wondering if the additional features of the Rebel T7i / 800D are worth the additional size and weight compared to the Rebel SL2 / 200D. If so, it's important to know how the two cameras stack up against one another.
 
Below are some of the primary similarities and differences between the Rebel T7i and Rebel SL2.
 
Canon EOS Rebel T7i and Rebel SL2 Shared Primary Features:
 
  • 24.2 MP Dual Pixel CMOS AF sensor
  • DIGIC 7 processor
  • ISO 100 - 25600 (H1: 51200)
  • 30 - 1/4000 sec shutter speed (1/2 or 1/3 stop increments)
  • 1/200 sec (flash) x-sync
  • Ambience priority, White priority Auto White Balance (AWB)
  • Pentamirror viewfinder with 95% coverage
  • Vari-angle touchscreen LCD, 7.7 cm (3.0") 3:2 Clear View II TFT, approx. 1040 K dots
  • Up to 1920 x 1080 (59.954, 29.97, 25, 23.98 fps) video recording
  • Video output (PAL/ NTSC) (integrated with USB terminal), HDMI micro out, external microphone (3.5mm Stereo mini jack)
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, NFC & Bluetooth
Advantages of the EOS Rebel T7i over the EOS Rebel SL2:
 
  • More advanced AF: 45 cross-type AF points (27 f/8 points [9 cross-type], center point f/2.8 and f/5.6 dual cross-type) vs. 9 AF points (f/5.6 cross type at center, extra sensitivity at f/2.8)
  • Wider AF working range (better in low light): EV -3 - 18 vs. EV -0.5 -1
  • Better metering: 7560-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor, metering with the area divided into 63 segments (9 × 7) vs. 63 zone dual-layer metering sensor
  • More autoexposure bracketing (AEB) options: 2, 3, 5 or 7 Shots +/-3 EV vs. 3 shots +/- 2 EV
  • Intelligent viewfinder vs. fixed
  • Single axis electronic level vs. N/A
  • More powerful pop-up flash: 13.1 GN vs. 9.8
  • Pop-up flash can act as master vs. N/A
  • Faster continuous shooting and larger buffer: 6 fps, 27 RAW vs. 5 fps, 6 RAW
  • Longer battery life: 820 shots vs. 650
Advantages of the EOS Rebel SL2 over the EOS Rebel T7i
 
  • Higher viewfinder magnification: 0.87x vs. 0.82x
  • Smaller size/weight: 4.82 x 3.65 x 2.75" (122.4 x 92.6 x 69.8mm), 15.98 oz (453g) vs. 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm), 18.77 oz (532g)
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i / 800D?
 
If minimal size/weight are not top priorities, and the Rebel T7i's higher price tag is not a barrier to investment, the T7i's higher-end features will make it a more versatile choice for most photographers. In fact, its more advanced, more sensitive in low light AF system alone is likely worth the T7i's price over the SL2.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel SL2 / 200D?
 
If you want the most lightweight, compact DSLR, or if your budget does not extend to the Rebel T7i's price tag, the Rebel SL2 will be a solid investment. The SL2 provides a solid feature set at a very reasonable price, and anyone carrying their camera kit for long periods of time (those hiking, for example) will surely appreciate the camera's smaller size and weight. Other groups who will gravitate to the SL2 include those with smaller hands and those intending to use the camera in a high-risk remote setup. Because of its small size and simple user interface, the SL2 may be the perfect DSLR to buy for a young photographer-in-training.
 
Summary
 
Built around an identical sensor and sharing many noteworthy features, the Rebel T7i and SL2 are more similar than they are different. Both deliver very good image quality, feature excellent subject tracking in video mode and offer an intuitive user interface that makes the cameras very easy to use, especially for those with minimal photography experience or otherwise transitioning from a compact camera or a smartphone.
 
Arguably the Rebel T7i's biggest drawback – its higher price tag – results from the inlcusion of noteworthy features not found in the SL2 (primarily, a much better AF system). For most photographers, the Rebel T7i will fulfill their needs better because of those additional features. But for those who don't need those features, are budget limited or who otherwise value reduced size and weight, the Rebel SL2 remains a viable option.
 
More Information
 
See our full list of Camera Gear Comparisons to aid in other purchasing decisions.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 8/25/2017 6:52:00 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, August 18, 2017
The Canon EOS Rebel SL2 / 200D and Rebel T6 / 1300D represent the brand's budget level DSLR offerings, and while high level features are certainly compromised, thankfully, image quality – at least from an APS-C/crop sensor perspective – is not. To aid in your decision making between the two cameras, let's dive into their differences to see which may be the best fit for your needs.
 
Let's first take a look at the Rebel SL2's advantages in this comparison.
 
Advantages of the EOS Rebel SL2 over the EOS Rebel T6:
 
  • More resolution: 24.2 MP vs. 18
  • DIGIC 7 processor vs. DIGIC 4+
  • Evaluative, partial, center-weighted & spot metering vs. evaluative, center-weighted & partial
  • Larger ISO range: 100-25600, H:51200 vs. 100-6400, H: 12800
  • Larger viewfinder magnification: 0.87x vs. 0.80x
  • Vari-angle touchscreen 7.7 cm (3.0"), approx. 1040k dots vs. non-vari-angle, non-touchscreen 7.5cm (3.0") TFT, approx. 920k dots
  • Slightly more powerful pop-up flash: 9.8 GN vs. 9.2
  • Fine Detail Picture Style vs. N/A
  • Continuous shooting (2-10 shots) after 10-second timer vs. N/A
  • Faster burst rate: 5 fps vs. 3
  • 1080p 60fps vs. 1080p 30fps
  • Better Live View focus: Dual Pixel CMOS AF vs. contrast AF
  • Timelapse movie recording vs. N/A
  • Wi-Fi, NFC & Bluetooth vs. Wi-Fi & NFC
  • 3.5mm microphone terminal vs. N/A
  • Better battery life: approx. 650 shots vs. 500
  • Smaller and lighter: 4.82 x 3.65 x 2.75" (122.4 x 92.6 x 69.8mm), 15.98 oz (453g) vs. 5.08 x 3.99 x 3.06" (129.0 x 101.3 x 77.6mm), 17.1 oz (485g)
And now let's look at the Rebel T6's advantages.
 
Advantages of the EOS Rebel T6 over the EOS Rebel SL2:
 
  • Faster pop-up flash recycling time: approx 2 sec. vs. 3
  • Lower cost
Another difference between the two cameras is that the Rebel SL2 records video in .MP4 format for normal recording (.MOV for timelapses) while the Rebel T6 records in .MOV format. Either format may be a Pro/Con depending on one's desired recording preference.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel SL2
 
With the Rebel SL2's numerous feature benefits over the Rebel T6, anyone whose budget extends to the SL2 and can shoot with the body comfortably (not necessarily everyone can), the choice is easy – get the Rebel SL2.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T6
 
Considering the Rebel SL2's strong list of advantages over the T6, there are still groups of photographers who may be inclined to purchase Rebel T6 over the SL2, including:
 
  • Those whose budget is a primary limiting factor.
  • Those with larger hands who will prefer the T6's larger body.
  • Those who will be using the camera in risky situations, such as remote setups or a gifting to a youth photographer-in-training.
Summary
 
Few camera comparisons are as clear-cut as this one. Almost any of the Rebel SL2's benefits listed above could easily justify its higher, but still-very-reasonable price tag over the Rebel T6, with the sum of those benefits providing an excellent overall value for consumers. However, while the Rebel T6's larger body may be appreciated by select photographers, its very low price tag will likely prove to be the ultimate deciding factor for the majority who add it to their kits, or more likely, begin their photography kits with.
 
More Information
 
See our full list of Camera Gear Comparisons to aid in other purchasing decisions.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 8/18/2017 7:38:03 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, August 9, 2017
If you are currently in the process of upgrading DSLRs, or otherwise looking to add a second camera to your kit, the Canon EOS 6D Mark II and EOS 80D could be prime candidates for consideration.
 
Many people may be surprised to know just how similar the full-frame 6D Mark II and APS-C sensor 80D really are. Here's a quick rundown of the features these cameras share:
 
EOS 6D Mark II and 80D Shared Primary Features
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor
  • Compatible with EF, TS-E and MP-E lenses
  • AF System: 45 cross-type AF points (27 f/8 points [9 cross-type], center point is f/2.8 and f/5.6 dual cross-type)
  • AF Working Range: EV -3 - 18 (at 23 °C & ISO 100)
  • Flicker detection and anti-flicker shutter timing
  • Autofocus microadjustment
  • Up to 1920 x 1080 60fps movie recording
  • Movie Servo AF tracking speed and sensitivity adjustment
  • Single SD, SDHC or SDXC (UHS-I) memory card slot
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and NFC
Now let's take a look at some of the EOS 6D Mark II's advantages in this comparison.
 
Advantages of the EOS 6D Mark II over the EOS 80D:
 
  • Full-frame sensor
  • Higher resolution: 26.2 MP vs. 24.2
  • DIGIC 7 processor vs. DIGIC 6
  • Spot AF
  • Less noise, especially at higher ISOs
  • Dual-axis electronic level vs. single-axis
  • 4K time-lapse video recording
  • Built-in GPS and Bluetooth
  • Better battery life: Approx. 1200 vs. 960
And below are the primary advantages the EOS 80D has over its full-frame counterpart.
 
Advantages of the EOS 80D over the 6D Mark II:
 
  • Compatible with EF-S lenses
  • Slightly higher dynamic range
  • Slightly faster burst rate / larger buffer: Approx. 7fps, up to 25 images RAW vs. 6.5fps, up to 21 images RAW
  • Pop-up flash featuring master functionality
  • Faster max shutter speed: 1/8000 sec. vs. 1/4000
  • Faster max flash sync speed (x-sync): 1/250 sec vs. 1/180
  • Headphone terminal
  • Slightly smaller size / weight: 5.47 x 4.14 x 3.09" (139.0 x 105.2 x 78.5mm), 25.75 oz (730g) vs. 5.67 x 4.35 x 2.94" (144.0 x 110.5 x 74.8mm), 26.98 oz (765g)
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the EOS 6D Mark II?
 
If shooting in low light and using relatively high ISOs, the EOS 6D II will give you noticeably cleaner (less noisy) images at the same ISO setting. The full frame sensor will also create a stronger background blur with the same subject framing and aperture in use.
 
For those interested in movie shooting, the 6D II offers the benefit of in-camera 4K time-lapse recording, although it does not feature a true Tv/Av mode during video recording like most higher-end models (instead, the camera defaults to P mode where both the shutter and aperture are adjusted to maintain exposure) and a headphone socket for audio monitoring is unavailable.
 
If built-in GPS and Bluetooth are high on your priority list, the 6D II has those features while the 80D does not.
 
Who should opt for the EOS 80D?
 
If you are upgrading from an APS-C (crop) sensor camera and currently have several APS-C lenses in your kit, the EOS 80D offers a seamless transition without the need to upgrade your EF-S lenses to full-frame compatible EF lenses, a transition that could prove significantly more costly than a simple camera body upgrade. And the benefits of EF-S lenses include [typically] lower cost and smaller size/weight compared to their full-frame counterparts.
 
Those shooting fast action may not notice an appreciable difference in the burst rate between the two cameras; however, the larger buffer of the 80D could prove to be a differentiating factor in some situations. The 80D's higher pixel density offering more reach to those requiring longer focal lengths will be especially welcomed by photographers covering long field sports.
 
The AF point spread of the 80D covers a higher percentage of the viewfinder for optimal framing using traditional phase detect AF, although the use of Live View AF can mitigate the difference between the two bodies.
 
If you are interested in shooting using off-camera lighting, the 80D's pop-up flash with master functionality means that you may not need a costly accessory to control your off-camera flashes, with the reduced size and weight of your sans-accessory camera being another benefit.
 
If in-camera 4K time-lapse video is not important to you (you can always create 4K time-lapses in post), the 80D features the same video recording capabilities as the 6D II yet also features a headphone terminal for audio monitoring. Unless filming in low light using high ISOs is necessary for a bulk of your filmmaking, the 80D should work just as well for most with video production aspirations.
 
Summary
 
These cameras are actually more similar than they are different, with the sensor size probably being the most significant differentiating factor between the two cameras. If you're eager to enjoy the image quality benefits provided by a full-frame sensor, the 80D's benefits over the 6D Mark II won't likely tip the scales in the smaller sensor camera's direction.
 
However, if your budget is limited and/or you enjoy the benefits of EF-S lenses, or you otherwise want a body which offers a more versatile sports or video capture platform, the 80D's benefits may make it the logical choice for adding to your kit.
 
More Information
 
See our full list of Camera Gear Comparisons to aid in other purchasing decisions.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 8/9/2017 12:01:00 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, July 14, 2017
If you want to reduce the size and weight of your camera, but do not want to give up great image quality, then the Canon EOS Rebel SL2 and EOS M5 will likely be considered prime candidates for incorporating into your camera kit.
 
First, let's look at some of the primary features these cameras have in common:
 
  • 24.2 MP APS-C Dual Pixel CMOS sensor
  • DIGIC 7 processor
  • Pop-up flash (no master functionality)
  • Native ISO range: 100-25600
  • Images/movies stored to SDHC/SDXC (UHS-I) memory card
  • 1/4000 max shutter speed
  • 1/200 flash sync speed
  • Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC
  • USB 2.0, HDMI (micro) & 3.5mm stereo mini jack
Advantages of the EOS Rebel SL2:
 
  • Natively compatible with EF, EF-S, TS-E & MP-E lenses
  • Ambience / White Priority AWB vs. Ambience only
  • Vari-angle touchscreen LCD vs. Tilt-type touchscreen LCD
  • Higher built-in flash guide number: 9.8m vs. 5m
  • Wider exposure compensation range: +/- 5 stops vs. +/- 3 stops
  • Selectable IPB standard / IPB light encoding vs. single in-camera default
  • Longer battery life: 650 vs. 395 (420 with Eco Mode On)
  • Working humidity: 90% vs. 85%
  • Lower price
Advantages of the EOS M5:
 
  • Native EF-M lenses are smaller/lighter than similar EF-S/EF lenses
  • More AF Points: 49 vs. 9
  • 1/3-stop ISO adjustments vs. full stops
  • 100% viewfinder coverage vs. 95%
  • Larger LCD screen: 3.2" vs. 3.0"
  • Higher burst rate/larger buffer: max 9 fps, up to 17 RAW vs. 5 fps, up to 6 RAW
  • Slightly smaller/lighter: 4.6 x 3.5 x 2.4" (115.6 x 89.2 x 60.6mm), 15.1 oz. (427g) vs. 4.82 x 3.65 x 2.75" (122.4 x 92.6 x 69.8mm), 15.98 oz (453g)
  • Wider operating range: 14-104°F / -10-40°C vs. 32-104°F / 0-40°C
Who should opt for the EOS Rebel SL2?
 
If you want a compact camera with a traditional optical viewfinder, there's only one choice in this comparison – get the Rebel SL2. Note, of course, that I didn't list the optical viewfinder (OVF) or the electronic viewfinder (EVF) as an advantage for the respective cameras above; both have advantages and disadvantages compared to the other, so your needs and shooting preferences will ultimately determine which type of viewfinder is right for you.
 
While those photographing fast action may appreciate some of the M5 advantages over the SL2, the SL2's OVF implementation is better-suited for tracking action while capturing a burst of images.
 
If you want to create videos with your new camera, both feature Movie Servo AF via Canon's Dual Pixel CMOS AF sensor technology, but only the SL2 offers selectable IBP standard and IBP light encoding as well as a vari-angle LCD screen.
 
Those creating HDRs through manual exposure bracketing will appreciate the SL2's wider exposure compensation range (although the auto exposure bracketing (AEB) spec is the same for both cameras – 3 shots up to +/- 2 stops).
 
For those who tend to occasionally forget to pack important items in their gear bag, an advantage of the SL2 is its native compatibility with all of Canon's EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses (no adapter required). Those needing to control larger lenses on their camera and those actively using the camera for substantial time periods will appreciate the SL2's more substantial grip.
 
The Rebel SL2 has one particular advantage that nearly every photographer can appreciate – a significantly lower price compared to the M5.
 
Who should opt for the EOS M5?
 
Traveling? The M5 might be the better option for you. Two primary advantages of a mirrorless system are reduced size and weight. While the size and weight differences between these two models are likely not as significant as you might expect, the EOS M5 delivers on both counts. It is the lightest and most compact in this comparison.
 
EF-M lenses are generally smaller and lighter than their DSLR-compatible counterparts, and the size and weight savings becomes more significant as your kit grows. However, the relatively small number of EF-M lenses (especially those with wide apertures) may prove limiting for some types of photography and if more flexibility is required, the EOS M5 is compatible with all EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses when paired with a Canon EF-M Lens Adapter.
 
Anyone valuing more AF points, a larger AF point spread, faster burst rate, larger buffer and wider operating range will be attracted to the EOS M5.
 
Summary
 
When it comes down to it, both of these cameras are smaller and lighter than traditional APS-C DSLR cameras, yet offer the same great image quality you've come to expect from such cameras. With an advanced AF system and the ability to use a wide range of lenses (with an adapter), the M5 will prove to be a compelling choice for many. However, adapting lenses made for DSLRs arguably negates much of the "reduced size and weight" advantage of owning a mirrorless camera and the SL2, with its more substantial grip, permits better, more comfortable control over the camera. Of course, if (or more likely, when) Canon fills out its EF-M lineup offering lenses similar to its EF/EF-S offerings, the size and weight advantages of its mirrorless range will likely be much more significant.
 
For those that prefer a traditional optical viewfinder, desire a vari-angle LCD or simply want a more compact (and affordable) DSLR, the Rebel SL2 checks all those boxes with a native-mount lens lineup that is sure to meet your needs without the need for an adapter.
 
More Information:
 
See our full list of Camera Gear Comparisons.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 7/14/2017 8:02:16 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, July 5, 2017
When an updated camera model is introduced, it's fair to wonder if your needs will be best served by the new model or whether the older model will serve your intended purposes sufficiently with cost savings being the primary benefit.
 
With the Canon EOS 6D Mark II's announcement, I'm sure many people are considering either a camera upgrade or the addition of a second camera to their kit. And since the original 6D is still available (at least for now), it makes sense to look closely at these two cameras to see if the 6D II's updated features are worth its higher price for your specific needs.
 
As the 6D doesn't really have any signifcant advantages over the 6D Mark II aside from a lower price, so we'll simply take a look at the upgraded features of the 6D II to put the current cost differential into context.
 
Advantages of the EOS 6D Mark II over the 6D:
 
  • 26.2 MP CMOS sensor with Dual Pixel CMOS AF vs. 20.2 MP (no DPAF)
  • 45-point AF system (all cross-type) vs. 11 points (f/5.6 cross type at center, extra sensitivity at f/2.8)
  • Up to 21 active AF points with f/8 max aperture vs. no active AF points at f/8
  • 7560-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor affecting 63 segments vs. 63 zone Dual Layer SPC
  • 6.5 fps. (up to 21 images in RAW) vs. 4.5fps. (up to 17 images in RAW)
  • DIGIC 7 vs. DIGIC 5+
  • Customizable, Intelligent Viewfinder with transparent LCD overlay vs. standard viewfinder
  • AWB (Ambience priority/White priority) vs. AWB (Ambience priority only)
  • Vari-angle touchscreen LCD (1.04 million dots) vs. fixed
  • Flicker Light Detection and Shutter Timing vs. none
  • Full HD 1080p 60 fps movies with 5 axis electronic image stabilization vs. 1080p 30 fps (no electronic stabilization)
  • WiFi, NFC, Bluetooth & GPS vs. WiFi and GPS
  • Intervalometer with 4K Timelapse Movie Mode featuring 3840px UHD resolution vs. no intervalometer or in-camera timelapse
Who should opt for the EOS 6D Mark II?
 
If you are a wildlife photographer, the 6D II's significantly better AF system and the ability to utilize lens + extender combinations with an f/8 maximum aperture ultimately make it a much better choice compared to the 6D and its 11-point AF system. Those needing to capture wildlife at the peak of action will also benefit from the 6D II's faster burst rate. If sports photography is on your to-do list, then these same features along with Light Flicker Detection and Shutter Timing will be prove quite advantageous to you as well.
 
Event photographers will especially appreciate the 6D II's upgraded AF system and [almost certain] great image quality at higher ISOs, as both will be very beneficial for documentary style photography in light-starved venues.
 
Do you plan on photographing your child/children as they play? The 6D II's advanced AF system will ensure you get more in-focus shots compared to its predecessor.
 
Filmmakers will especially appreciate the 6D II's Dual Pixel CMOS AF sensor with its ability to track action in movie mode. Other features that filmmakers will enjoy include the vari-angle LCD (with touch-focus), the ability to capture video at 60 fps and in-camera 4K timelapses (though many may still prefer to compile their timelapses in post-processing). Even if not utilizing the in-camera timelapse movie feature, the built-in intervalometer negates the need for an additional accessory to capture timelapses.
 
Even if you're not a serious filmmaker, the 6D II's Movie Servo AF can help you to capture high quality home movies that your family will enjoy for years to come.
 
The customizable Intelligent Viewfinder is a convenient feature that nearly every photographer can appreciate, with the ability to display a single axis level indicator, gridlines or other relevant information. For those who enjoy sharing their images quickly and easily, the 6D II's NFC & low-energy Bluetooth connections may also prove to be a differentiating factor.
 
Who should opt for the EOS 6D?
 
If you don't believe the sum of the value of the benefits listed above justify the incrementally higher cost of the 6D Mark II, then the original 6D may be the perfect camera to add to your kit (or otherwise build your kit around). It features excellent full frame image quality and is great for landscapes, cityscapes, architecture/real estate, vacations, family gatherings, studio portraiture and macros.
 
Summary
 
The Canon EOS 6D Mark II included a lot of feature updates that 6D owners had been asking for, including (but not limited to) a more advanced AF system and a Dual Pixel CMOS AF sensor. The 6D II is intended to be the full frame camera for the budget-conscious consumer, just as the 6D was at its introduction. However, this time around, that same consumer group will be getting a much more versatile camera for their very reasonable investment.
 
If your budget doesn't extend to the 6D II's introductory price, the 6D is the lowest-priced full frame Canon DSLR on the market right now, and it's well worth the price. However, for a little more, the 6D II is an even better value considering its overall feature set.
 
Check out our Camera Specifications Tool to fully compare these cameras:
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 7/5/2017 7:13:27 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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