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 Friday, April 6, 2018

 
In the video above, photographer Matthew Jordan gives us a walkthrough of his 3 light (plus 1 reflector) beauty setup. He also makes a very good point about how a light meter can help you produce a more consistent-looking body of work.
 
Below are the second and third videos in this series.
 


 
B&H carries Sekonic light meters.
Post Date: 4/6/2018 7:26:16 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, April 5, 2018
Time and time again, we've stressed the importance of having a structured, reliable method for backing up your images and keeping them safe. In its latest blog post, LensRentals enumerates how videographers can protect themselves from data loss through reliable data transfer and backup techniques.
 
From the LensRentals Blog:
By Ryan Hill
 
Two or three times a week here at Lensrentals.com, we get one of two common support calls. Scenario number one is that someone thought they transferred all of their footage over, but later found that they missed a couple of clips and need us to send them their rental cards back. If we haven’t inspected those cards yet, we’re happy to do that, but if our techs have already inspected them, that’s a problem we can’t solve. We perform a full and secure format at inspection to make sure previous customers’ footage isn’t recoverable on subsequent rentals. Once the footage is gone, the footage is really and truly gone. No amount of file recovery software can bring it back. That’s never a fun phone to call to have.
 
The second scenario is that someone did manage to transfer over all of their footage, but one of the clips was corrupted in the transfer. Typically this realization comes during the edit, after we’ve already formatted the original media. That’s an equally tough phone call. True, sometimes file corruption happens in-camera, but nine times out of ten, the file was corrupted during the transfer from the card to the computer or hard drive. These kinds of problems aren’t something you can avoid entirely. There are inherent risks in working with digital media just like there are inherent risks in working with tape or film. However, there are steps you can take to mitigate that risk and to ensure that, if a problem arises, you’re prepared to work around it.
See the entire article on the LensRentals Blog.
 
Photo Backup Information
 
Post Date: 4/5/2018 11:04:08 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
What I hoped to share with you today was an accurate representation of the image quality delivered by the Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8 DG HSM Art Lens. While we do have the test results for this lens loaded on the site and will again in the future, the results from this specific lens are only temporarily available. Why only temporarily available? I want to use them for an illustration.
 
We have apparently received a lens with an improperly-aligned element or group of elements (this is a retail-acquired lens). The image included with this post shows all for corners of a 14mm f/2.8 image. Lenses are round and symmetrical and a properly constructed lens will render all four corners identically. Obviously, this one does not. The top right, the corner that shows in the site's image quality tool, is unfortunately the worst. The corner results are less significantly different at the longer focal lengths, but 14mm is going to be this lens' most important focal length for many.
 
When unequal corner performance happens, we test another copy of the lens. So, in this case, first looks at the Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8 DG HSM Art Lens image quality mean second looks are needed. Stay tuned for that. If the right side looks as good as the left ... we should be very pleased.
 
While we are looking at this comparison image, I'll make another point and that is in regards to the linear distortion profile of this lens. At close focusing distances, the Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8 Art Lens has very significant barrel distortion at 14mm. Fortunately, this distortion is greatly reduced at longer focus distances. I'll illustrate that in the review.
 
The Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8 DG HSM Art Lens is in stock at B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX.
Post Date: 4/5/2018 9:22:14 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Canon has released firmware updates for several of its video cameras.
 
Canon EOS C300 Mark II / C300 Mark II PL Firmware v.1.1.1.1.00
 
Firmware Version 1.1.1.1.00 incorporates the following enhancements:
 
  • Retrieval of lens metadata, such as focal length, is now supported during XF-AVC recording.
  • Sensitivity adjustment has been added for the LM-V1 LCD Monitor.
  • Auto IRIS support has been added for the following lenses:
    • EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM
    • EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM
  • Fixed a phenomenon in which the CFast card recording and/or REC OUT terminal output footage may be momentarily distorted when the shooting frame rate is set to 120fps in the [Slow & Fast Motion (crop)] recording mode on cameras running Firmware Version 1.0.8.1.00 or later.
Caution:
 
  • You cannot perform the firmware update using CFast 2.0 cards. Please use a commercially available SD/SDHC/SDXC memory card that is 64MB or more for the firmware update.
  • Firmware version 1.1.1.1.00 is for updating Cinema EOS C300 Mark II cameras running firmware version 1.0.0.1.00 - 1.1.0.1.00. If your camera's firmware is already version 1.1.1.1.00, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camera is updated to the latest version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
  • For further information, please refer to the latest version of the camera’s Instruction Manual that is released with the firmware update.
Download: Canon EOS C300 Mark II / C300 Mark II PL Firmware v.1.1.1.1.00
 


Canon EOS C200 / EOS C200B Firmware v.1.0.3.1.00
 
Firmware Version 1.0.3.1.00 incorporates the following enhancements:
 
  • XF-AVC format recording has been added*1*2*3*4.
  • Retrieval of lens metadata, such as focal length, is now supported during XF-AVC recording.
  • Hybrid Log Gamma HDR ITU-R BT.2100 output has been added.
  • Sensitivity adjustment has been added for the LM-V1 LCD Monitor.
  • LPCM 24-bit audio recording has been added when recording in the Cinema RAW Light format*5.
  • 4X magnification has been added.
  • A PsF output function from SDI and HDMI has been added during progressive internal recording.
  • A digital tele-converter function has been added (1.5x, 3.0x, and 6.0x).
  • Auto IRIS support has been added for the following lenses
    • EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM
    • EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM
  • Peripheral illumination/chromatic aberration correction has been added for the following lenses
    • EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
    • EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM
    • EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM
    • EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM
    • EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM
  • The reproducibility of bright areas has been enhanced when the gamma setting is from Normal 1 to 4.
  • Browser remote setting options are retained after switching off the camera.
*1 Please use the following software applications:
  • Canon XF Utility 3.3 for Windows/macOS
  • Canon XF Plugin 3.3 for Avid Media Access (Windows/macOS)
*2 You will need to format the SD cards completely with the camera before recording.
*3 For detailed information about SD cards that have been verified to work with this camera, please visit Canon's Web site.
*4 Canon has verified that clips shot with this firmware version can be imported directly intoApple’s Final Cut Pro X version 10.4.1.
*5 Please use the following software applications:
  • Cinema RAW Development 2.2 for Windows/macOS
  • Canon RAW Plugin 2.1 for Avid Media Access (Windows/macOS)
  • Canon RAW Plugin 1.1 for Final Cut Pro X
Caution
 
  • You cannot perform the firmware update using CFast 2.0 cards. Please use a commercially available SD/SDHC/SDXC memory card that is 64MB or more for the firmware update.
  • Firmware version 1.0.3.1.00 is for updating Cinema EOS C200 cameras running firmware version 1.0.0.1.00-1.0.2.1.00. If your camera's firmware is already version 1.0.3.1.00, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camera is updated to the latest version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
Download: Canon EOS C200 / EOS C200B Firmware v.1.0.3.1.00
 


Canon XF405 / XF400 Firmware v.1.0.1.0
 
Firmware Version 1.0.1.0 incorporates the following enhancements:
 
  • XF-AVC format recording has been added *1* 2* 3* 4.
  • The flicker reduction function has been added
  • Enhances menu operations so that the Browser Remote setting options are retained after switching off the camera.
*1 Please use the following software applications:
  • Canon XF Utility 3.3 for Windows/macOS
  • Canon XF Plugin 3.3 for Avid Media Access (Windows/macOS)
*2 You will need to format the SD cards completely with the camera before recording.
*3 For detailed information about SD cards that have been verified to work with this camera, please visit Canon's Web site.
*4 Canon has verified that clips shot with this firmware version can be imported directly intoApple’s Final Cut Pro X version 10.4.1.
 
Caution:
 
  • Please use a commercially available SD/SDHC/SDXC memory card that is 64MB or more for the firmware update.
  • Firmware Version 1.0.1.0 is for XF405/XF400 camcorders with Firmware Version 1.0.0.x. If your camcorder's firmware is already Version 1.0.1.x, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camcorder is updated to the latest version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
  • In the detail, Please refer to the latest user's manual that we will release at the same time of firmware release.
Download: Canon XF405 / XF400 Firmware v.1.0.1.0
 


Canon VIXIA GX10 Firmware v.1.0.1.0
 
Firmware Version 1.0.1.0 incorporates the following enhancements:
 
  • The flicker reduction function has been added.
  • Enhances menu operations so that the Browser Remote setting options are retained after switching off the camera.
Caution
 
  • Please use a commercially available SD/SDHC/SDXC memory card that is 64MB or more for the firmware update.
  • Firmware Version 1.0.1.0 is for VIXIA/LEGRIA GX10 camcorders with Firmware Version 1.0.0.0. If your camcorder's firmware is already Version 1.0.1.0, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camcorder is updated to the latest version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
  • In the detail, Please refer to the latest user's manual that we will release at the same time of firmware release.
Download: Canon VIXIA GX10 Firmware v.1.0.1.0
 
B&H carries the following products:
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/5/2018 9:27:45 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
The home for motion picture professionals looking for education, training, testing and networking with industry colleagues. From lens to camera through post workflow to display, our state of the art facility features a complete edit suite, 4K color finishing suite, twin camera prep and test bay and a lit shooting space. Canon Burbank also serves as a hub for expedited repairs performed by on-site certified Canon technicians.
Posted to: Canon News
Category: Canon USA News
Post Date: 4/5/2018 8:33:30 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Melville, NY—To promote awareness regarding the safety risks of using counterfeit accessories, such as batteries, chargers and external flashes, as well as how to avoid counterfeit products, Canon and the National Crime Prevention Council (NCPC) announced a call for submissions for the Stop Fakes video contest.
 
Entrants are asked to create an original video demonstrating their creative interpretation of one or more of Canon’s top 10 anti-counterfeit tips. A full list of tips can be found here: https://stopfakescontest.ncpc.org/contest-details. Entries will be judged based on creativity, originality, effectiveness and clarity of the Stop Fakes theme based on at least one of the top 10 tips to avoid counterfeits.
 
Moreover, the video submissions must be 27 seconds long, contain all original content and be less than 50MB. In addition, they must be in one of these file formats: MPG, MPEG, MPEG-2, MP4, WebM, MOV, FLV. Entrants can submit one new original video per day. However, all videos must be uploaded by 12:00 p.m. ET on April 23, 2018 for a chance to win.
 
Stop Fakes Contest Prizes
 
Furthermore, entrants will have the chance to win one of three Canon prizes, including:
 
  • Grand Prize: EOS 5D Mark IV EF 24–105mm f/4L IS II USM Kit
  • First Runner-Up: EOS M50 Video Creator Kit
  • Second Runner-Up: PowerShot G7X Mark II Video Creator Kit
In addition, the grand prize winner could have their video featured as part of the nationwide anti-counterfeit consumer awareness campaign. For official rules and to enter the contest, visit https://stopfakescontest.ncpc.org/rules.
Posted to: Canon News
Category: Canon USA News
Post Date: 4/5/2018 8:04:10 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From SIGMA:
 
Ronkonkoma, NY – April 5, 2018 – The Sigma Corporation today announced the newest accessory for its Cine High Speed 14mm T2 FF Prime Lens – the Clamp-On Ring 162mm COR-11, which extends the front diameter of the lens to 162mm. When attached to a wide-angle matte box compatible with 6.6" x 6.6" square type filters such as the ARRI LMB-6 (2-stage), the setup allows cinematographers to film on full-frame cameras without undesired vignetting. The Sigma COR-11 is also compatible with SF Ex-tender SF-E1 (optional) and other third-party accessories. Sigma continues to expand its Cine offering by providing solutions to the increasing demand for cine lenses compatible with digital cinema cameras with large format sensors.
 
The Clamp-On Ring 162mm COR-11, along with Sigma Cine lens lines – High Speed S35 Zoom, FF Zoom and FF High Speed Prime, will be on display at the 2018 NAB Show in Las Vegas from April 9th through April 12th in booth C10308.
 
Pricing and availability of Sigma COR-11 will be announced at a later date.
 
B&H carries the Sigma Cine 14mm T2 FF Lens.
Category: Sigma News
Post Date: 4/5/2018 6:46:47 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the Canon USA YouTube Channel:
 
Cinematographer/filmmaker Ivo Norenberg approached Canon in 2010 with a request for an extreme lens. Ivo challenged Canon to produce a long zoom 4K Super 35mm lens tailored to the diverse needs of wildlife video production.
 
B&H carries the Canon CINE-SERVO 50-1000mm T5.0-8.9 Lens.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/5/2018 5:46:28 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, April 4, 2018
By Sean Setters
 
While on vacation in Pigeon Forge, TN, my wife and I decided to tackle some easy-to-moderate trail hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Being spring break for many primary school students, the park was more crowded than usual. With that in mind, we decided to avoid all the paved trails which are typically popular for family hikes. While we had a few trails in mind, a stop at the Sugarlands Visotors' Center and a talk with one of the rangers proved vital to determining which trails we would ultimately traverse as the ranger provided previously unknown information like temporary road temporary road closures, likely crowd sizes and the types of things we might see on each trail. In the end, we settled on the Porters Creek Trail / Fern Branch Falls at Greenbrier and Cucumber Gap Loop at Elkmont.
 
Photography was not a primary goal for these hikes; spending quality time with my wife who thoroughly enjoys hiking was. However, going on the hikes without a camera seemed unimaginable to me, so I decided to pack a small kit with the intent of pausing our hike periodically so that she could meditate to the tranquil sounds of the wind in the forest and the gently flowing creek. At least, that's how I sold the idea to her as she watched me pack my small camera backpack.
 
I knew that our hikes would follow a couple of creeks and their smaller tributaries. I wanted to use long exposures to capture silky movement in the water, which meant that an ND filter was necessary. I decided to bring my Singh-Ray Vari-N-Duo filter because its variable neutral density filter and circular polarizer combination seemed well suited for photographing flowing water. Note that I didn't say "perfectly suited" as I own the standard version of the filter which is very thick (it extends .69" / 17.54mm from the end of the lens) and causes significant mechanical vignetting at focal lengths wider than roughly 50mm on the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM (mounted on a full frame EOS 5D Mark III) that I took with me. In short, the tradeoff for getting an ND + polarizing effect was the loss wide angles of view.
 
Using exposures long enough to capture ample motion blur in the water necessitated a stabilized camera, and that meant I needed to bring a tripod or alternate method of stabilization. My primary tripod and head weigh in at nearly 6.5 lb (2.9 kg) and when compacted, are still 27.75" (70.49 cm) long. The size and weight of the tripod made it an inconvenient and cumbersome choice for the hikes, especially considering the small camera backpack I planned to take on the trips.
 
In place of the primary tripod I opted to take my Feisol TT-15 Carbon Fiber Tabletop Tripod. Even with a small travel-style ball head attached, the tripod and head weigh less than 1 lb (0.45 kg) and are only 8.38" (21.29 cm) long when folded down. The combo's small size and minimal weight made carrying the tripod a breeze yet it allowed me to capture the long exposures I was hoping to get. That said, there was one significant drawback to the diminutive tripod, which is that the framing and composition options available at any given time depended on the surfaces (and especially the height of those surfaces) available at any specific location. There were several locations that I thought looked interesting but couldn't find a suitable platform high enough to get the composition I wanted. But in most cases along the Smoky Mountain Trails we traversed, a large rock bordering (or in) the water or a fallen tree trunk provided a sufficiently high enough platform for pleasing compositions.
 
Porters Creek Trail, Great Smokey Mountains National Park #2

In the end, I was extremely happy I had the Feisol TT-15 Tabletop Tripod in my kit. Consider picking one up if you plan on hiking moderate-to-long distances and want to reduce the weight you bear with every step.
Post Date: 4/4/2018 10:52:22 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
Johnnie Behiri of cinema5D was given exclusive access to SIGMA's Aizu cinema zoom and Art-series lens manufacturing facility in Bandai, Fukushima, Japan. During his visit, he got to sit down with Kazuto Yamaki-san, SIGMA's CEO, to discuss the company's manufacturing processes and the legacy of Yamaki-san's father, Michihiro Yamaki, the founder of SIGMA.
 
B&H carries SIGMA lenses. Be sure to check out our SIGMA Lens Reviews for more details on the various Art, Sport and Contemporary-series lenses.
Post Date: 4/4/2018 6:54:58 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, April 3, 2018
From Canon USA:
 
Firmware Version 1.1.2 incorporates the following improvements and fixes:
 
  • Support has been added for chromatic aberration correction, peripheral illumination correction, distortion correction, and Digital Lens Optimizer when using Digital Photo Professional to process RAW images captured with the following TS-E lenses: TS-E 17mm f/4L, TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II, TS-E 50mm f/2.8L MACRO, TS-E 90mm f/2.8L MACRO, or TS-E 135mm f/4L MACRO.
  • Fixes a phenomenon in which standard exposure may not be obtained, or an irregular exposure may result, when Silent LV (Live View) shooting with the following TS-E lenses: TS-E 50mm f/2.8L MACRO, TS-E 90mm f/2.8L MACRO, or TS-E 135mm f/4L MACRO.
  • Support for Exif 2.31 has been added.
  • Fixes a phenomenon in which the camera may not function normally when using the Camera Connect application to shoot a high frame rate movie.
  • Fixes a phenomenon in which error 80 may occur when HDR movies are shot using the Remote Live View Shooting function. (Applies only to Canon Log-supported cameras.)
Note:
 
  1. Once the EOS 5D Mark IV is updated to Version 1.1.0 (or later), it cannot be restored to a previous firmware version (Version 1.0.1 to 1.0.4).
  2. Cameras running Firmware Version 1.1.0 are cameras that have received the charged upgrade service to support Canon log at a Canon service center. Canon Log support will not be affected on cameras running Firmware Version 1.1.0 that are updated to Firmware Version 1.1.2 being released this time. For cameras running Firmware Version 1.0.4 or earlier, even if the firmware is updated to Version 1.1.2, Canon Log will not be supported. Users who wish to have their camera support Canon Log are asked to make a request for the charged upgrade service at a Canon service center.
  3. When using Version 4.7.10 (or earlier) of Digital Photo Professional to edit JPEG/RAW images captured with a camera updated to Firmware Version 1.1.2 (or later), some of the Exif data may be deleted. In addition, chromatic aberration correction, peripheral illumination correction, distortion correction, and Digital Lens Optimizer cannot be used when processing RAW images captured using a TS-E lens (TS-E17mm f/4L, TS-E24mm f/3.5L II, TS-E50mm f/2.8L Macro, TS-E90mm f/2.8L Macro, or TS-E135mm f/4L Macro). Please be sure to update Digital Photo Professional to Version 4.7.20 (or later) before performing image processing.
Download: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Firmware v1.1.2
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/3/2018 4:05:38 PM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
Adobe has updated Camera RAW by incorporating the Camera Profiles (now simply called "Profiles") section (previously found on the Calibration tab) with the basic tab where Exposure, Contrast, Highlights & Shadows adjustments are made.
 
Surprising is that Adobe has changed the default profile for RAW files to something new – Adobe Color – which features warmer reds, yellows and oranges and increased contrast compared to the previous default, Adobe Standard.
 
Note: If you have created custom camera profiles with an X-Rite Color Checker Passport, you can find them under the "Profiles" section after clicking "Browse Profiles." However,if you choose the "Legacy" section, you'll see previews of Black & White versions of your custom profiles (for some reason). [Sean]
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
From Canon USA:
 
MELVILLE, N.Y., April 3, 2018 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, has announced that Mr. Yuichi Ishizuka, the company’s president and chief operating officer, has taken a new assignment as president and chief executive officer of Canon Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) as of April 1, 2018. This announcement marks the culmination of a thirty-three year tenure with Canon Americas for Mr. Ishizuka, who also holds the position of managing executive officer for Canon Inc. in Japan.
 
Canon U.S.A. has announced that Mr. Kazuto Ogawa will succeed Mr. Ishizuka in the role of president and chief operating officer. Mr. Ogawa comes to Canon U.S.A. from Canon China, where he served as executive vice president. Mr. Ogawa brings with him over three decades of experience with Canon, including positions across the globe.
 
“I’d like to thank Mr. Yuichi Ishizuka for his strong leadership, visionary spirit and tireless dedication to Canon U.S.A., where he provided the same innovative direction that he will bring to his new role overseeing Canon Europe, Middle East and Africa,” said Joe Adachi, chairman and chief executive officer, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “It is with great honor that I announce the appointment of Mr. Kazuto Ogawa to the position of president and chief operating officer of Canon U.S.A. On behalf of the company, I welcome Mr. Ogawa to our team and look forward to working alongside him as we continue to cement our status as an imaging leader.”
 
A graduate of Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan, Mr. Ogawa began his career with Canon Inc. in 1981. Between the years of 1995 and 2005, Mr. Ogawa held positions with Canon Singapore, Canon Hong Kong and Canon China before returning to Canon Singapore to serve in the role of president and chief executive officer. In 2008, Mr. Ogawa was named president and CEO of Canon Canada. Following that, he was named as an executive officer of Canon Inc. in 2011. He was later appointed executive vice president of Canon China in February 2014, and became a managing executive officer of Canon Inc. in April 2016.
Posted to: Canon News
Category: Canon USA News
Post Date: 4/3/2018 7:37:09 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Canon has released a firmware update for the EOS-1D X Mark II. [thanks Scott]
 
From Canon USA:
 
Firmware Version 1.1.6 incorporate the following fix:
 
  • Fixes a phenomenon in which the camera may not function normally when images are simultaneously displayed on the camera’s LCD monitor and an external monitor (via HDMI output).
Download: Canon EOS-1D X Mark II Firmware v.1.1.6
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/3/2018 6:46:31 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, April 2, 2018

 
From the Adroama YouTube Channel:
 
David Bergman shows you how to make perfect copies of flat artwork.
 
Note: Want more tips on photographing artwork? Check out our article, "Photographing Flat Art."
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/2/2018 9:34:15 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Noise test results (110 test images) have been added to the Canon EOS M50 page.
 
So far, I really like this little camera.
 
The Canon EOS M50 is in stock at B&H | Amazon | Adorama.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 4/2/2018 7:30:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
From the Adobe Photoshop YouTube Channel:
 
Learn how to create a custom brush in Photoshop during this week's episode.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Post Date: 4/2/2018 5:59:37 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, March 30, 2018
If you're ready to step up from smartphone photography to one of Canon's entry-level DSLRs, you may be asking yourself "Which might be a better option for me? The Canon EOS Rebel T7i or the Rebel T7?"
 
If so, you're in luck. Today we're going to take a close look at these two Canon Rebel cameras to see which might be the better fit for your needs. First, let's take a look at what they have in common.
 
Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D and Rebel T7/2000D Shared Primary Features:
 
  • Resolution: 6000 x 4000 pixels (24 MP)
  • Crop Factor: 1.6x (APS-C sensor)
  • Metering Range: EV 1 – 20
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-5 EV in 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments
  • Shutter Speed: 30-1/4000 sec
  • Flash x-sync: 1/200 sec
  • Viewfinder: pentamirror, 95% coverage
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and NFC
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D:
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor vs. traditional CMOS sensor
  • Better Image Processor: DIGIC 7 vs. DIGIC 4+
  • Better AF System: 45 cross-type AF points (45 f/5.6 cross-type AF points, 27 f/8 points [9 cross-type], center point is f/2.8 and f/5.6 dual cross-type) vs. 9 AF points (f/5.6 cross type at center)
  • Focuses in Lower Light: EV -3 - 18 (at 23 °C & ISO 100) vs. EV 0 -18 (center point), EV 1 -18 (outer points)
  • Better Metering: 7560-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor, metering with the area divided into 63 segments (9 × 7) [Evaluative, Partial, Center-weighted and Spot] vs. TTL full aperture metering with 63-zone SPC [Evaluative, Partial and Center-weighted]
  • More Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB) Options: 2, 3, 5 or 7 Shots +/-3 EV 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments vs. 3 shots +/- 2 EV, 1/2 or 1/3-stop increments
  • Greater ISO Range: ISO AUTO (100 - 25600), 100 - 25600 (H1: 51200) in 1 stop increments vs. AUTO (100-6400), 100-6400 (H: 12800) in 1-stop increments
  • Custom, Color Temperature White Balance Setting vs. none
  • Higher Pop-up Flash Guide Number: 13.1 (ISO 100, meters) vs. 9.2
  • Peripheral illumination, chromatic aberration, distortion and diffraction correction vs. peripheral illumination correction only
  • Higher Burst Rage with Larger Buffer: max. approx. 6 fps for 27 RAW images vs. 3 fps for 11 RAW
  • Higher Framerate Full HD Video: 1080p video at 60 fps vs. 1080p video at 30 fps
  • Low-energy Bluetooth vs. none
  • More Custom Functions: 15 custom functions with 44 settings vs. 11 custom functions with 33 settings
  • External 3.5mm microphone port vs. none
  • Compatible with Faster Memory Cards: supports SDXC (UHS-I) vs. SDXC
  • Better Battery Life: approx. 820 shots vs. 500
  • Compatible with More Remotes: E3 (corded), infrared (RC-series) & Bluetooth vs. E3 only
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D
 
  • Smaller Size: 5.08 x 3.99 x 3.06" (129.0 x 101.3 x 77.6mm) vs. 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm)
  • Lighter Weight: 16.75 oz (475g) vs. 18.77 oz (532g)
  • Lower cost
If you glance at the specifications comparison found on this site, you'll likely notice that the Rebel T7 features a faster pop-up flash recycling time compared to the Rebel T7i (2 sec vs. 3 sec), which would seem to indicate an advantage. However, the T7 has a faster recycling time because it has a lower power flash. When fired at the T7's full power level, the T7i's recycling time will likely be similar.
 
Who Should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D?
 
When describing the customers who may be best served by the cameras in one of our comparisons, we typically start with the higher-end option as its versatility will make it an overall better option for most consumers. In this case, the feature difference between the cameras is so substantial and the advantages so one-sided that there is really only one reason to choose the Canon EOS Rebel T7 over the Rebel T7i – a lower price tag.
 
The Rebel T7i's Dual Pixel CMOS AF sensor, more advanced/sensitive AF system, higher burst rate/larger buffer and longer battery life could all be considered justification for the camera's higher price tag when considered individually. Put all those features together and the value you receive for the T7i's incremental price over the T7 is monumental.
 
Who Should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D?
 
As previously mentioned, the primary reason to opt for the EOS Rebel T7/2000D is for its lower cost. The Rebel T7 will be more than adequate for capturing high quality imagery under normal / not-so-challenging conditions, and those stepping up from smartphone photography will certainly appreciate the benefits of a significantly larger sensor and the ability to change lenses. And speaking of lenses, for the price of a Rebel T7i + EF-S 18-55 IS STM kit, you could get a Rebel T7 + EF-S 18-55 IS II, EF 50mm f/1.8 STM and EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM lens.
 
Beginner/novice photographers aren't the only groups that will appreciate the Rebel T7's lower price tag. Advanced photographers wanting to capture images in high-risk-of-damage situations can more easily justify the sacrificial cost of a Rebel T7. Such photographers can mount the T7 to a car, motorcycle, bicycle, boat, etc. to capture dynamic imagery without risking damage to their primary camera(s).
 
Summary
 
Few camera comparisons are a clear-cut as this one. The Canon EOS Rebel T7i's superset of features will make it a more versatile imaging platform for those who can afford its price difference over the Rebel T7. But for those whose budgets don't extend that far, especially beginner/novice photographers, the Rebel T7 offers a solid step-up for those currently shooting with smartphones and/or point-and-shoot cameras who want to experience the benefits of interchangeable lens camera photography first-hand.
 
Relevant Info
 
The Canon USA Store is the exclusive North American retailer of the Canon EOS Rebel T7 (so far). The Canon EOS Rebel T7i can be found at B&H | Adorama | Amazon (for more retail links, see the bottom of the T7i Review).
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/30/2018 10:37:45 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the Canon USA YouTube Video:
 
The 120MXS is an ultra-high resolution CMOS sensor with 13280 x 9184 effective pixels(approx. 60x the resolution of Full HD). It has a size equivalent to APS-H (29.22mm x 20.20mm), and a square pixel arrangement of 2.2µm x 2.2µm with 122 million effective pixels. Ultra-high-resolution is made possible by parallel signal processing, which reads signals at high speed from multiple pixels. All pixel progressive reading of 9.4fps is made possible by 28 digital signal output channels. It is available in RGB or with twice the sensitivity, in monochrome.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/30/2018 6:55:00 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Canon:
 
What is the Sensor Change Service?
 
Canon’s sensor change service offers EOS C700 & EOS C700 PL owners the opportunity to convert their standard sensor for the Global Shutter sensor. The Global Shutter sensor offers incredible performance at 4.2K Resolution with 14 stops of resolution at its base ISO.
 
Canon EOS C700 Global Shutter Conversion Table

Pricing*
 
ModelPriceNote
C700$3,700 The cost of the conversion from EF to PL lens mount is included in the $3,700 price
C700 PL$2,500 
*All pricing is subject to change
 
Thank you,
Customer Support Operations
Canon U.S.A., Inc.
 


Canon’s Lens Mount Replacement Service offers EOS C300 Mark II and EOS C700 PL owners the opportunity to convert to Cinema Lock EF Mount or back to the original mount*.
 
*If you would like to reverse to the original mount, please include the returned parts with the camera to our service facility.
 
Pricing
 
Service Options for EOS C300 Mark II & EOS C700 PL
Mount Replacement Service **Includes Mount kit, Shim Kit, and laborEF Mount with Cinema Lock$2,170
**Does not include taxes or shipping fees
***All pricing is subject to change
 
Downloads
 
EOS C700 User Guide contains information on how to use Cinema Lock.
 
Thank you,
Customer Support Operations
Canon U.S.A., Inc.
 
B&H carries the Canon EOS C700 Cinema Cameras.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/30/2018 6:37:43 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, March 29, 2018
From GoPro:
 
Proven Design at a Powerful Price $199 HERO Joins $299 HERO5 and $399 HERO6, Making GoPro Life-Capture Accessible to All
 
SAN MATEO, Calif., March 29, 2018 – GoPro, Inc. (NASDAQ: GPRO) has added a new HERO camera to the family. On sale now, HERO is a $199, go-anywhere, capture-anything camera that makes it easy to share experiences that would be difficult to capture with a phone. GoPro launches entry-level HERO at the powerful $199.99 price.
 
HERO features a 2-inch touch display, is waterproof to 30 feet and is extremely durable, making it the perfect GoPro for kids, adventurous social sharers and travelers.
 
"HERO is a great first GoPro for people looking to share experiences beyond what a phone can capture," says Meghan Laffey, GoPro's VP of Product. "HERO makes it easy to share 'wow' moments at a price that's perfect for first-time users."
 
Sharing cool experiences with HERO is simple. It offloads your photos and videos to the GoPro app which creates fun, shareable videos for you, automatically. No more fumbling with your SD card or plugging your camera into a computer. HERO makes it simple.
 
GoPro HERO Back

Those looking for the ultimate GoPro-experience can subscribe to GoPro's PLUS subscription service. Cloud backup, damaged camera replacement, 20-percent off accessory discounts and more are included with a PLUS subscription for just $4.99 a month, cancellable anytime.
 
HERO is available today at retailers around the world. Key features include:
 
  • Award-Winning Image Quality: HD Video (1440p60 and 1080p60) and 10MP photo performance
  • 2-Inch Touch Display: Using HERO is as easy as using your phone thanks to its touch display
  • Voice Control: Tell HERO to start and stop recording, take a photo, turn off and more
  • Waterproof + Extremely Durable: Waterproof up to 30' (10M) and designed go everywhere your smartphone can't
  • Video Stabilization: HERO features video stabilization that helps smooth out the shakes
  • Smartphone Compatible: HERO offloads your photos and videos to the GoPro app which creates fun, shareable videos for you, automatically
  • Body and Gear Mountable: compatible with 30+ GoPro mounting accessories
B&H has the GoPro Hero in stock with free expedited shipping.
Category: GoPro News
Post Date: 3/29/2018 11:29:27 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
I have a Canon EOS M50 in my hands and just completed preparing the camera for use. Following are the 31 steps I took to make an out-of-the-box M50 ready to use.
 
  1. Open the box, find the battery, place it in the charger and plug it in.
  2. While the battery is charging, unpack the other items you want from the box.
  3. Download and install the Canon Solution Disk software on your computer to get support for the latest camera(s). Canon Digital Photo Pro (DPP), EOS Utility, Photostitch and Lens Registration Utility are the options I manually include in the install.
  4. Attach the neck strap.
  5. Insert the battery (after charging completes) and power the camera on.
  6. The date, time and time zone setup screen will show at the first startup. Use the rear cross key control and the set button to update this information.
  7. Insert a memory card (don't forget to format the card via the tools menu option before taking pictures).
  8. Set the camera's mode to Av, Tv or M (some modes provide only a small subset of available menu options).
  9. Press the Menu button and scroll through all of the available tabs to configure the camera as follows:
  10. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Image quality: Use top dial to set RAW to "RAW" and rear cross-keys control to set JPEG to "-"
  11. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Image review: 4 sec.
  12. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Lens aberration correction: disable all (I correct lens aberrations during post processing if warranted, but chromatic aberration correction is usually a good option to enable)
  13. Shooting Menu, Tab 4: White balance: AWB W
  14. Shooting Menu, Tab 4: Picture Style: Neutral with Sharpness = 1 (Note: the low contrast "Neutral" picture style provides a histogram on the back of the camera that most-accurately shows me blown highlights and blocked shadows on the camera LCD. I usually change the Picture Style to "Standard" in DPP after capture.)
  15. Shooting Menu, Tab 5: Long exp. noise reduction: Auto
  16. Shooting Menu, Tab 5: High speed NR: Off (or Low) (noise reduction is destructive to images details - I prefer to add NR sparingly in post)
  17. Shooting Menu, Tab 5: Touch & drag AF settings: Touch and drag AF: Enable, Positioning method: Relative
  18. Shooting Menu, Tab 6: Continuous AF: Off
  19. Playback Menu, Tab 4: Playback information display: Change #2 to RGB histogram, disable all options except #1 and #2
  20. Function Settings Menu, Tab 1: Auto Rotate: On (computer only)
  21. Function Settings Menu, Tab 3: Beep: Disable
  22. Function Settings Menu, Tab 4: Shooting info. disp.: Screen info/toggle settings: Update #1 to select only basic shooting info, On screen buttons and Electronic level, all options except Detailed shooting info selected for #2 and uncheck #3, #4 and #5 (it takes too long to toggle through all of the available options during use)
  23. Function Settings Menu, Tab 4: Shooting info. disp.: VF info/toggle settings: Uncheck #1, update #2 to select only Electronic level and update #3 to select Histogram disp and Electronic level
  24. Function Settings Menu, Tab 4: Shooting info. disp.: Grid display: 3x3
  25. Function Settings Menu, Tab 4: Shooting information display: Histogram display: RGB
  26. Function Settings Menu, Tab 5: Custom Functions(C.Fn): C.Fn I ISO expansion: 1:On
  27. Function Settings Menu, Tab 5: Copyright information: Enter author's name
  28. Display level settings, Tab 1: Menu display: Standard
  29. Display level settings, Tab 1: Mode guide: Disable
  30. Display level settings, Tab 1: Feature guide: Disable
  31. My Menu: Add the first tab; Register the following options for Tab 1: Long exposure noise reduction, Format card, Date/Time/Zone (great for monitoring what time it is), Expo. comp./AEB (found back up near the top of the list)
I of course make other menu and setting changes based on current shooting scenarios, but this list covers my initial camera setup process.
 
To copy this configuration would mean that you intend to shoot similar to how I shoot - including shooting in RAW-only format. While my setup works great for me, your best use of this list may be for tweaking your own setup.
 
If you can't remember your own menu setup parameters, keeping an up-to-date list such as this one is a good idea. Anytime your camera goes in for a service visit, the camera will be returned in a reset-to-factory state (unless you request otherwise). Your list will ensure that you do not miss an important setting when putting the camera back into service.
 
More Information
 
Canon EOS M50
 
The Canon EOS M50 is in stock at B&H | Amazon | Adorama.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/29/2018 8:04:26 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
B&H has ProGrade Digital CFast 2.0 and SDXC UHS-II Memory Cards in stock.
 
Unfamiliar with the ProGrade Digital? The company was formed by formar Lexar executives with a focus on memory cards with superior quality, performance and reliability.
Post Date: 3/29/2018 6:46:30 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the newly announced Apple 9.7" iPads available for preorder.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 9.7" Multi-Touch Retina Display
  • 2048 x 1536 Screen Resolution (264 ppi)
  • Apple A10 Fusion SoC & M10 Coprocessor
Category: Preorders
Post Date: 3/29/2018 6:37:41 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, March 28, 2018
Canon is apparently releasing firmware updates for several its Cinema cameras; unfortunately, the udpates aren't available just yet at Canon USA (but I expect they will be soon). To read about the firmware updates, check out this article on the Canon Digital Learning Center.
 
Listed below are the notable changes.
 
EOS C300 Mark II / C300 Mark II PL v.1.1.1.1.00
 
  • Touch-Panel Sensitivity Adjustment
  • Lens Metadata Information (XF-AVC)
  • Auto Iris support has been added for the following lenses:
    • EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM
    • EF-85mm f/1.4L IS USM
EOS C200 / EOS C200B v.1.0.3.1.00
 
  • MXF (XF-AVC) Support
  • Progressive Segmented Frame Support
  • Magnification Support (4x Recording)
  • 24-bit LPCM Audio Support in Cinema RAW Light
  • Digital Tele-Converter (1.5x, 3.0x, 6.0x)
  • HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma) Support (Output Only)
  • Lens Metadata Information (XF-AVC)
  • Touch-Panel Sensitivity Adjustment
  • Auto Iris support has been added for the following lenses:
    • EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM
    • EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM
  • Correction for Peripheral Illumination and Chromatic Aberration for the following lenses:
    • EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM
    • EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM
    • EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM
    • EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM
    • EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM
  • Enhancements
    • The image reproducibility in bright areas has been enhanced when the gamma setting is from Normal 1 to 4.
    • Enhances menu operations so that the Browser Remote setting options are retained after switching off the camera.
XF405 / XF400 v.1.0.1.0.00
 
  • MXF (XF-AVC) Support
  • Flicker Reduction
EOS C700 / EOS C700 PL / EOS C700 GS PL v.1.0.5.1.00
 
  • Super 16mm (2K Crop) Recording Mode Added
  • RAW Recorder Voltage Indicator
  • Lens Metadata Information (XF-AVC)
  • Metadata (Model distinction metadata of C700 GS PL has been added)
  • Saved Settings Fix
B&H has the Canon EOS M50 Mirrorless Camera in stock with free shipping.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 24.1MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • DIGIC 8 Image Processor
  • 2.36m-Dot OLED Electronic Viewfinder
  • 3.0" 1.04m-Dot Vari-Angle Touchscreen
  • UHD 4K and HD 720p120 Video Recording
  • Built-In Wi-Fi with NFC, Bluetooth
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF
  • Extended ISO 51200, 10 fps Shooting
  • Combination 5-Axis Image Stabilization
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/28/2018 9:13:58 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Canon USA:
 
MELVILLE, N.Y., March 28, 2018 – Canon U.S.A. Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the launch of a new addition to the Cinema EOS System: the CN-E20mm T1.5 L F lens - a full-manual 20mm Cinema Prime Lens for EF Mount cameras. A popular focal length, the 20mm lens delivers exceptional optical performance in a compact form factor. With the introduction of this new lens, Canon further enhances its EF Cinema Lens family to meet a diverse range of cinematic and video-production needs, further contributing to the world of cinematography.
 
“As Canon continues to expand its reach in the cinema space, we are thrilled to introduce the CN-E20mm T1.5 L F lens, further expanding a robust line up of Cinema Prime lenses,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, president and COO, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “This new lens will provide users with an option in-between our 14mm and 24mm lenses, giving greater flexibility for their scene framing. Canon is excited to see the projects our users create with this lens and Canon Cinema cameras.”
 
The new CN-E20mm T1.5 L F lens can provide 4K resolution from the center of the images to the periphery, providing high image quality for Canon cameras that feature full-frame sensors such as the new EOS C700 FF digital cinema camera. In addition, the 11-blade aperture diaphragm alongside a T number1 of 1.5 allows the lens to provide beautifully soft bokeh. Like all Canon Cinema Prime lenses, the CN-E20mm T1.5 L F lens features warm, natural-looking tones, 300 degrees of focus ring rotation, and minimized focus breathing.
 
Since the launch of the Cinema EOS System and EF Cinema Lenses in November 2011, Canon has greatly expanded the EF Cinema Lens offerings. The lineup—which includes the Prime, Zoom, Compact Zoom, CINE-SERVO and COMPACT-SERVO series of lenses—has become very popular for a wide range of users. With the introduction of the CN-E20mm T1.5 L F lens, the lineup now boasts a total of 21 lens models. This expansive line of lenses provides cinematographers with even more options to choose from, which can support enhanced content creation for a variety of uses and shooting scenarios.
 
The CN-E20mm T1.5 L F lens is scheduled to begin shipping in fall 2018.
 
B&H has the Canon CN-E 20mm T1.5 L F Cinema Prime Lens available for preorder.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/28/2018 9:03:35 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Canon USA:
 
MELVILLE, N.Y., March 28, 2018 – Canon U.S.A. Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, is excited to announce the EOS C700 FF, the Company’s first full-frame cinema camera. The beauty and majesty of full-frame digital cinema is now becoming a new creative reality. Since the introduction of the EOS 5D Mark II DSLR camera in 2008, Canon has been a part of the full-frame video movement, and the introduction of the C700 FF has reinforced Canon’s commitment to this market. At the heart of the camera is a novel Canon-developed CMOS image sensor having a total of 5952 (H) x 3140 (V) photosites with a digital cinema 17:9 aspect ratio, which gives it the same image circle size as the full frame EOS 5D camera series. This supports a wide range of shooting options.
 
Available in both PL and EF Mount, the EOS C700 FF provides users with the same outstanding performance, operation and modular design as the EOS C700 (released in December 2016). The camera is being shown publicly for the first time at the Canon booth (C4325) at the NAB Show 2018 in Las Vegas from April 9-12.
 
“Since the launch of Canon’s Cinema EOS line of products in November 2011, the goal was to one day develop a cinema camera worthy of being the ‘A’ camera on major Hollywood productions, and Canon met that goal with the introduction of the EOS C700,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, president and COO, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “After listening to our customers and closely monitoring market trends, Canon set forth a new goal: to launch a full-frame cinema camera. With this introduction, we are very excited to see the C700 FF in the hands of industry professionals as they shoot their latest projects.”
 
Existing owners of Canon’s original EOS C700 cinema camera will be pleased to know they can have their Super 35mm sensor upgraded to the new Full-Frame sensor for a fee*. Authorized Canon facilities such as Canon Burbank are ready to process C700 upgrades as well as lens mount swaps, and offer equipment drop off, on-site repairs and upgrades, as well as equipment testing and demonstration.
 
The Sensor
 
The newly developed sensor featured in the EOS C700 FF has an active image area of 38.1 x 20.1mm and supports readout at full size, as well as Super 35mm, Super 16mm and anamorphic modes. In addition to full-frame lenses, it can be used with conventional Super 35mm lenses to originate 4K / UHD standardized production formats and Super 16mm lenses (with an adapter) to originate 2K / HD production formats in crop modes. The sensor captures wide tonality exceeding 15 stops of dynamic range and a wide color gamut meeting ITU-R BT.2020 standards. This offers broad latitude when grading, providing outstanding effectiveness in HDR video production.
 
Recording
 
The EOS C700 FF embodies a choice of two high-performance codecs for on-board recording –Canon XF-AVC or Apple ProRes. Like other cameras in the 4K Cinema EOS family, the EOS C700 FF uses CFast cards to capture 4K / UHD or 2K / HD. A striking feature of the C700 FF is the Oversampling 4K Processing that processes a 5.9K image capture to produce 4K (DCI or UHD) having enhanced image sharpness, curtailed moire, and a lowered visibility of noise at the higher ISO settings. This is especially advantageous for on-board anamorphic image capture. Low-rate 2K/HD proxy data including metadata, can be recorded to SD cards, ideal for offline editing. The camera also allows high-frame-rate recording of up to 168fps in 2K crop and relay or simultaneous recording onto both CFast cards. In addition, the C700 FF can shoot at a Full HD high-frame-rate recording at a maximum of 168 fps. Additional formats are planned with future firmware updates.
 
To further complement the features of the EOS C700 FF, Canon has turned to its trusted partner Codex to provide a fully integrated (no cables) recording and workflow option. The combination of the optional Codex CDX-36150 recorder docked onto the back of the EOS C700 FF enables 5.9K 60 fps RAW recording, 4K RAW up to 72 fps (in 24p mode), 4K ProRes up to 60 fps and 2K ProRes up to 168 fps (in Super 16mm mode).
 
The C700 FF also supports the latest version (1.0) of the ACESproxy, the ACES (Academy Color Encoding System) color management transmission standard.
 
HDR
 
For users looking to create High Dynamic Range (HDR) imagery, the EOS C700 FF is an excellent solution, providing 15 stops of latitude (with Canon Log2 only), along with Canon’s proprietary Log Gammas (Canon Log3, Canon Log2 and Canon Log) and renowned color science. Canon Log2 is recommended when originating HDR imagery containing both highlight details and deep shadowed details. In comparison with Canon Log, Canon Log3 offers a wider dynamic range while retaining performance in darker regions.
 
Additionally, these cameras seamlessly integrate with Canon’s latest professional 4K UHD Reference Displays for on-set review and color management that conforms to SMPTE ST 2084 standards of HDR display.
 
The look of a cinematic production begins with the lens, and the EOS C700 FF offers both PL and EF lens mount options which are interchangeable at a Canon authorized service center. For full frame imaging, the EF lens mount version of the new EOS C700 FF is compatible with Canon’s family of seven Cinema Prime lenses, including the newly announced CN-E20mm T1.5 L F lens, as well as the diverse lineup of over 70 interchangeable EF lenses. The EF mount supports Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology and Dual Pixel Focus Guide. The Focus Guide assists operators with a precision visual indicator in the viewfinder when pulling focus. Alternatively, for certain demanding shooting situations the reliable capabilities of Dual Pixel CMOS AF can be deployed. The EOS C700 FF PL mount version is also compatible with Cooke’s /i metadata communication technology.
 
The EOS C700 FF EF and EOS C700 FF PL are scheduled to be available in July 2018 for an estimated retail price of $33,000.00. For more information on the EOS C700 FF please visit, usa.canon.com/provideo.
 
B&H has the Canon EOS C700 Full-Frame Cinema Camera available for preorder.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/28/2018 8:58:07 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Just posted: Canon EF-M 28mm f/3.5 Macro IS STM Lens Review.
 
Again we have John Reilly to heartily thank for his effort in creating this review.
 
The little, highly useful Canon EF-M 28mm f/3.5 Macro IS STM Lens is in stock at B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/28/2018 8:43:53 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, March 27, 2018
Do you need something soon (camera, lens, battery, memory card, etc.)? Now's the time to add the item to your cart and go through the checkout process at B&H before the superstore closes for the Passover holiday.
 
From B&H:
 
Online Ordering
 
Online ordering will pause during the following holiday observance periods:
 
  • 7:15pm Fri Mar 30 until 8:45pm Sun April 1
  • 7:15pm Thu April 5 until 8:45pm Sat April 7
Shipping
 
Orders placed before 4pm ET Thu Mar 29 will be processed prior to the holiday closing.
Orders placed after this time will be processed when we reopen on Sun April 8.
Category: B&H News
Post Date: 3/27/2018 3:43:31 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Image quality test results have been added to the Canon EF-M 28mm f/3.5 Macro IS STM Lens Page.
 
A full review of this lens should be available very soon.
 
The tiny, inexpensive Canon EF-M 28mm f/3.5 Macro IS STM Lens is in stock at B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/27/2018 7:30:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
From the Adorama YouTue Channel:
 
David Bergman shows you how to get the best color out of your flash gels.
 
Note: Dark gels (especially red) absorb more light and will deform/melt when the gel is taped directly to the flash head and high/continuous flash pulses are used. If taping a dark gel to the flash head, it's best to use a lower flash power and/or slower paced shooting combined with a higher ISO setting in camera to avoid damaging your gel. [Sean]
Post Date: 3/27/2018 6:31:57 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, March 26, 2018
Just posted: Canon TS-E 50mm f/2.8L Tilt-Shift Macro Lens Review.
 
Like the other two TS-E L lenses simultaneously introduced, the Canon TS-E 50mm f/2.8L Tilt-Shift Macro Lens has been hard to find in stock, but Amazon and eBay have this lens at the moment. Orders are being taken at B&H and Adorama.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/26/2018 8:40:21 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, March 25, 2018
While the full moon is a great and highly-popular photo subject, I'm just as big of a fan of photographing the small crescent phase.
 
Just after the new moon phase, the moon starts trailing the sun into the western horizon and very soon after the new moon, the brightly-visible shape of the moon is a tiny crescent and it descends into sunset colors. The opposite is also true. Just before the new moon, catch the waning crescent moon on the east horizon just before sunrise.
 
On this day at this time, the moon was 2.4% visible. The night before, I could not locate the .2% moon as it set due to its too-close proximity to the sun. The 7.2%-visible moon also looked great the next night, but the higher the moon is, the farther it is from the greatest likelihood of sunset color.
 
Photographing the moon is easy, but to get the moon in a photograph requires the moon to be visible. For the waxing crescent phase, a clear view of western sky just after sunset, or the eastern sky just before sunrise, is minimally required. Clouds can provide some interest and add color, but they can block the key subject. A clear sky nearly assures a visible moon and a bright orange horizon.
 
While the weather is long-term unpredictable, moon phases are highly predictable. The moon takes 29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes and 3 seconds to complete a lunar month. If this subject interests you, set a calendar appointment. If one attempt does not work out, just wait for the next opportunity to come in about a month.
 
A consideration for a moon photograph is the foreground. Moon photos can work well with only sky in them, but in this case, I went for a clean mountain range as the base of the image. Something interesting silhouetted in front of the sky also works very well (consider the depth of field required for this). Artificial lighting can be used to change the silhouette to a fully-lit subject.
 
Which focal length should be used to photograph the moon? That depends on how big you want the moon to be. The longer the focal length, the larger the moon will be rendered in the frame. A 1200mm full frame angle of view renders the moon only about 1/3 of the narrow dimension of the frame. Use wider focal lengths to include more sky color and additional elements in the frame. The Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens is an excellent choice for this purpose, providing a nice range of focal length options.
 
Remember that lunar photography is not extreme low light photography – the illuminated portion of the moon is in direct sunlight. Avoid overexposing the moon. Balancing the brightness of the sky with the brightness of the moon simply involves timing. Start photographing prior to the optimal time and continue until the lighting is past your desired result.
 
I opted to slightly crop the original capture during post processing, making a minor adjustment the overall balance. From a white balance perspective, I warmed the bottom of the frame, cooled the overall balance and added some saturation to pull out the colors. Overall, this is a simple image to capture and having Venus available (that is not a white dust spec on your screen) was a bonus on this particular evening.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
Post Date: 3/25/2018 12:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Saturday, March 24, 2018
Fifty mm lenses are useful for many subjects and one of the great uses for tilt-shift lenses is architecture. From a previous Philadelphia visit, I knew where this focal length would work well with plenty of architecture in the frame.
 
The procedure for capturing this image is a rather standard one for me. Scout the location (already had this step done). Show up before sunset with a pair of cameras, lenses and tripods. Set up both using two significantly different focal lengths (cropping can effectively handle smaller differences in focal length, especially when using a 5Ds or 5Ds R camera) and begin photographing the city using a level-on-both-axes camera and a sharp f/8 aperture as the sun sets.
 
When the lights come on, I adjust the aperture to f/16 to gain the starburst effects from the lights. This aperture is not as sharp as f/8 due to the effects of diffraction, but details remain sharp enough (ideal would be to merge the areas of an f/8 image with the star effects of an f/16 image). Also, soon after the lights come on, I begin capturing an underexposed frame periodically so that I could later use it to pull the brightness of some of the lights down (the gridded triangle roof top was especially bright). I adjust the exposure as necessary as the sky darkens and when there is nearly no color left in the sky, I usually pack up and head home.
 
In the end, I usually archive most of the earlier-captured images as the images captured within the ideal 5 minutes of the blue hour are usually my most-preferred. Usually, the perfect timing exposure is f/16 for 30 seconds at ISO 100.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
Post Date: 3/24/2018 8:30:01 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, March 23, 2018

 
Adobe's Photoshop Lightroom CC has so many features that quickly accessing certain tools can be an issue at times. In this video, Benjamin Warde demonstrates some techniques for making Lightroom's user interface a little less cluttered.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Post Date: 3/23/2018 8:27:00 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
Want a good laugh to start your Friday morning? Press the "Play" button, sit back and relax while watching what a typical marriage proposal looks like these days.
Post Date: 3/23/2018 5:44:28 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, March 22, 2018
From the Canon Digital Learning Center:
The term “cross-type AF” has been used since the late 1980s in the camera industry, but perhaps not always with supporting information to clearly define what is meant by it. In this article, we’ll attempt to explain more clearly what the term means, and why it remains an advantage in SLR AF systems to this day.
Read the entire article at the Canon Digital Learning Center.
 
Want to know how many cross-type AF points your camera has? Check out our Camera Specifications Comparison Tool to find out!
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/22/2018 1:30:19 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
By Sean Setters
 
Take a look at the picture above and try to guess which color gels were used to create the in-camera effect. Then read on.
 
Backstory
 
Last week, Patrick, a friend of the site, emailed us asking for advice on how to photograph school children, in costume, for an upcoming performance of Peter Pan. Patrick said that he would be photographing about 70 kids and would be creating formal portraits in a gymnasium before the kids' initial performance. He had all the necessary equipment, but he simply wanted some guidance on the lighting setup.
 
During our email exchange where we discussed different ideas and setups, I suggested that Patrick might use 2 CTO (orange) gels on his main light and set his camera's white balance to a very cool Kelvin value to get a warm main light against cool (ambient or ungelled flash) fill and/or background light that might simulate theatrical lighting, the same technique that I described in a post from last year.
 
In the end, Patrick decided to go with a more traditional lighting technique that yielded great results. But the email exchange got me thinking about how opposite colors, like orange and blue, can be used to create intriguing images.
 
With a single (or stacked) CTO gel(s), you can vary the color intensity of the gelled light – even to white – in-camera by how much you shift your camera's white balance to blue (for example, using a low Kelvin white balance setting). That means you may be able to neutralize any color by shifting the white balance opposite direction (that's exactly what Auto White Balance does). But that also means that we can shift the color spectrum of our image to the opposite color of any gel by telling the camera that a neutral color target lit by the gelled light is actually neutral with Custom White Balance.
 
With that in mind, take a look at the image atop this post again. What gel (or gels) were used to create the in-camera color effect?
 
Gelling a Flash to Produce the Opposite Color
 
To test out this idea, I flipped through my collection of color gels until I found one that intrigued me – dark green (not the much lighter Plus Green). I honestly couldn't remember what the opposite of green was on the color spectrum and had to ask Google to help me out. The answer, of course, was red. I set up a tripod-mounted Canon EOS 5D Mark III and EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM, a couple of Canon Speedlites and a mottled gray background for a self-portrait.
 
The first thing I needed to do was photograph a neutral target using the gel. But instead of gelling the flash, I decided to gel the lens. Why the lens? Because my gel was big enough to cover the front element of the lens I was using and, if I had to illuminate a large [white] color target with multiple lights (for example), it would be easier to gel the lens rather than each individual light. I had never tried gelling a lens before, but it seemed to make sense for this purpose. I photographed a white target that filled the frame, illuminated by a bare Speedlite (very low power), using the green-gelled lens. I then used the image to set a Custom White Balance in-camera.
 
I put a flash grid on a Speedlite and pointed it at the background. A few test shots proved I was on the right track; the illuminated areas of the background were red. Now it was time to tackle the main light. I decided to use a gridded 24" collapsible soft box (similar to this) and positioned the soft box so that its light didn't contaminate the background (camera right, slightly behind me, pointed slightly toward the camera). I attached two gels to this flash, the green gel that I had used to create the custom white balance (in essence, turning the flash's output white) and a full CTO to provide some warmth.
 
As for the fill light, I decided to simply open the curtains on the windows behind the camera and let the daylight ambient light left the shadow areas. I reasoned that the indirect sunlight would be close enough in color to my bare flash that the effect would be similar, and even if they weren't, exact/precise color balance wasn't necessarily the point of this exercise. As long as the result looked interesting and illustrated the concept sufficiently, I was going to be happy. However, a few test shots confirmed that the color of the fill light looked similar to the light on the background, at least as far as this colorblind photographer was concerned. I also know that adding the additional CTO to the main light likely caused a less pronounced difference between its color and that of the background, but I thought the less dramatic color shift would make the image look a little more organic. After it was all said and done, I had a portrait with a red background and a red fill light with a much-less-red-tinted main light – in camera – without using a single red gel. EXIF for the image was f/4, 1/160 sec, ISO 800. In hindsight, I could have easily used a slower shutter speed and a lower ISO, but I was so used to using 1/160 second when using off-camera flashes with radio triggers to kill the ambient that I didn't think to adjust the shutter speed when I actually wanted the ambient to play a supporting role in the lighting.
 
When might this concept come in handy? Well, if you wanted your overall scene to be a certain color, but you didn't have that color gel in our kit, you could use the opposite color to shift your white balance to get similar results. Or, if you simply don't have enough gels for a multiple light setup, you could again shift the color spectrum of all your lights using a gel of the opposite color. This won't likely be a technique that gets you out of a jam, but... it can certainly be a fun technique to experiment with, and thinking about color balance and how to manipulate it in different ways may prove beneficial down the line.
 
B&H sells color gels for flashes.
Post Date: 3/22/2018 11:16:44 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the Opteka 12mm f/2.8 Lens in stock with free expedited shipping.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Mounts: Canon EF-M, Nikon CX, Sony E, Fujifilm X, MFT
  • Aperture Range: f/2.8 to f/22
  • HD Anti-Reflection Coating
  • Manual Focus Operation
  • 9-Blade Diaphragm
Post Date: 3/22/2018 10:02:52 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
The Canon EOS M50 is scheduled to be in stock at B&H, Adorama and the Canon Store on Monday, March 26.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 24.1MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • DIGIC 8 Image Processor
  • 2.36m-Dot OLED Electronic Viewfinder
  • 3.0" 1.04m-Dot Vari-Angle Touchscreen
  • UHD 4K and HD 720p120 Video Recording
  • Built-In Wi-Fi with NFC, Bluetooth
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF
  • Extended ISO 51200, 10 fps Shooting
  • Combination 5-Axis Image Stabilization
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/22/2018 7:22:41 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, March 21, 2018
From Venus Optics:
 
Featuring a 113° Angle of View, Ultra-fast f/2.8 aperture, close-to-zero distortion, 49mm filter thread & less than 0.5 pounds in weight, this is a perfect ultra-wide option for still & videographers.
 
Anhui China, Mar 21, 2018 – Venus Optics, the camera lenses manufacturer who had previously launched a number of unique Laowa camera lenses, is proud to announce the world’s widest rectilinear f/2.8 lens for mirrorless APS-C cameras, Laowa 9mm f/2.8 Zero- D.
 
Laowa 9mm f/2.8 Zero-D is the third member of the Laowa ‘Zero-D’ line-up and they all feature an excellent control of the optical distortion which is commonly appeared in ultrawide angle lenses. This new lens is an ultra-wide & ultra-fast prime lens with a 35mm equivalent focal length of around 13mm. Despite the extreme specifications, Venus Optics has successfully minimized the weight of the lens to less than 0.5 pounds (215g) and 2-inch (53mm) long. This compact and light lens comprises of 15 elements in 10 groups with 2 pcs of aspherical elements and 3 pcs of Extra-low dispersion elements. This optical design successfully minimizes the distortion and chromatic aberrations to its lowest but at the same time, delivers a superb optical performance from corners to corners.
 
The extreme 113° angle of view and ultra-fast f/2.8 aperture allows photographers to create impressive astro-photography shots with ease. It also gives photographers a fast and wide-angle option for landscape photography and low-light shooting. For videographers, the compact size of this lens is friendly to the use of gimbals or even handheld shooting without much of shaking. The lens is designed with a 49mm filter thread which gives additional portability for screw-in filters. It comes with both Sony E, Fuji X & EOS-M mounts.
 
Specifications
 
Focal Length9mm
Max. Aperturef/2.8
Angle of View113°
Format CompatibilityAPS-C
Lens Structure15 elements in 10 groups
Aperture Blades7
Min. Focusing Distance12cm
Max. Magnification01:07.5
Filter Thread49mm
Dimensions60 x 53mm
Weight215g
MountsFuji X, Sony E, Canon EF-M
Availability
 
The Laowa 9mm f/2.8 Zero-D is currently available to pre-order at authorized resellers. Recommended Retail Price in US (without tax) is USD $499.00. Pricing may vary in different countries.
 
The first 100 orders will get a set of Laowa 49mm filters for FREE (CPL + UV + ND1000). Shipping is expected to start from early April.
 
B&H carries Venus Optics Laowa lenses.
Post Date: 3/21/2018 7:28:44 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
by Sean Setters
 
I spent this past Saturday morning at the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge with the hopes of photographing a few birds while I was there. Unfortunately, opportunities to photograph my intended subjects were few and far between as it's just past the peak season for waterfowl in the area.
 
Egret Savannah Wildlife Refuge March 17 2018

However, as the image atop this post illustrates, there were definitely other subjects that deserved my attention. It seems that I wasn't the only top-level predator who was interested in the waterfowl.
 
American Alligator Savannah Wildlife Refuge March 17 2018 #2

There were plenty of warnings in the visitor's center that alligators were present in the refuge, but reading a warning doesn't invoke the same heart rate increase as seeing a pair of eyes and a snout just above the water line within 20 feet of you as you walk along a pathway.
 
And that got me thinking. When photographing birds, it's often ideal to photograph them from ground or water level, which means you will likely be positioned near the water's edge and in a rather defenseless, prone position. Unfortunately for us photographers, that's the same area where alligators find their easiest meals.
 
American Alligator Savannah Wildlife Refuge March 17 2018 #3

Of course, it's important to put hazard into context – attacks by American alligators are very rare. Since 2010, there have only been 6 confirmed deaths attributed to the species. However, I'd suggest taking a few precautions to ensure you're not the next unlucky one.
 
American Alligator Range

When you're photographing in a marshy area/wetland within the American alligator's range, here are a few things to keep in mind:
 
  • Avoid the water's edge and especially don't crouch down next to it. An American alligator can sprint at about 11 miles per hour (17.7 kph) for short distances. Alligators don't like chasing after prey, so the farther away from the water's edge you are, the less appealing you'll appear even to a particularly hungry one.
  • Stay alert. You are most vulnerable when looking through the viewfinder, so look around before doing so and try to minimize viewfinder usage as much as possible.
  • Alligators, like crocodiles, often work in teams. If you see one, there's a good chance there's another one (or more) nearby.
  • Alligators are most active from dusk to dawn, so try to avoid traversing alligator-prone areas during those times.
  • If you are attacked by an alligator, make as much noise as possible and fight back by hitting, kicking and poking it in the eyes. Alligators will often release prey and retreat when they cannot easily overpower it. Of course, seek medical attention as soon as possible.
Of course, you may find yourself in the same situation as me where the alligators prove to be the most interesting subjects available at the time. By staying away from the water's edge, remaining alert and minimizing use of your viewfinder, you can relatively safely photograph alligators using the same equipment ideal for bird photography; that is, a very long telephoto lens.
Post Date: 3/21/2018 12:25:34 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Image quality test results have been added to the Canon TS-E 50mm f/2.8L Tilt-Shift Macro Lens page.
 
Like the other two TS-E L lenses simultaneously introduced, the Canon TS-E 50mm f/2.8L Tilt-Shift Macro Lens has been hard to find in stock, but Amazon, Beach Camera and eBay have this lens at the moment. Orders are being taken at B&H and Adorama.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/21/2018 7:44:13 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, March 20, 2018
From B&H:
 
Explore Your Field In-Depth
B&H is proud to present the first annual Depth of Field conference. Over the course of two days, we aim to help beginner portrait, wedding and event photographers build their portfolios and learn new skills, while steering intermediate and advanced shooters to the latest innovations, shortcuts and gear via interactive events, demonstrations, workshops and more. Depth of Field is sure to entertain, enlighten and empower.
 
Dates: April 24th-25th, 2018
 
Location: The Penn Plaza Pavilion in New York City at 33rd Street & 7th Avenue NYC (conveniently located across the street from Penn Station and Madison Square Garden).
 
Speakers:
 
  • Lindsay Adler (Master of Ceremonies)
  • The Colagrossis
  • Elaine Zelker
  • Jay Cassario (Leica Ambassador)
  • Jennifer Moon
  • Jerry Ghionis (Nikon Ambassador)
  • Josh Helton
  • Laurent Martin
  • Mary Angelini
  • Matt Johnson
  • Mindy Veissid
  • Neil Clipper
  • Rob Adams
What To Expect
Over 30 top exhibitors will share their craft at the Depth of Field launch. In addition to a dedicated lecture stage and continuous Livestream feed, you can also take advantage of five, fully-equipped studio setups to allow guests to try out the latest cameras with live models, props and more.
 
Register Now
 
Category: B&H News
Post Date: 3/20/2018 7:13:13 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, March 19, 2018
Now live: Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens Review.
 
A big shout of thanks goes out to John Reilly for his effort in creating the review of this tiny lens!
 
The Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens is in stock at B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/19/2018 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Saturday, March 17, 2018
Upon arriving home late last night, tired after an 11 hour drive, I learned of the passing of Chuck Westfall. I felt like I had been punched in the chest.
 
I had the privilege of meeting with and talking to Chuck on numerous occasions and considered him a friend. Likely, most of those who watched or listened to Chuck, or simply read what he wrote, considered him their friend as well. Although incredibly intelligent, highly professional and always relevant, Chuck had a special way of conveying friendship.
 
Chuck's name was, and long will be, synonymous with the Canon brand. Chuck was always ready to listen and willing to answer any question presented to him. One could always expect the right answer to be clearly explained and ... it was usually delivered immediately.
 
Thanks for everything, Chuck! You will be greatly missed!
 
Chuck Westfall
Post Date: 3/17/2018 10:15:44 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, March 16, 2018
The New York Times has posted a job opening for a Photo Director. Here are the details:
 
From the New York Times:
The New York Times is a worldwide leader in photojournalism, earning multiple Pulitzer Prizes and World Press Photo awards in recent years and establishing standards for excellence and innovation that have been deeply influential across the industry. Photography is a central part of our identity. It’s how we bear witness to events that matter, and our Photo department is one of the treasures of our newsroom.
 
Now we’re looking for someone to lead this talented and diverse team and to become part of the visual leadership of the organization. We want to continue integrating photography and other forms of visual journalism into the fabric of our report — as closely as our words.
 
This role is one of the most important and high-profile jobs in visual journalism, and we’re seeking candidates with a rare combination of journalistic experience, organizational expertise and extraordinary visual talent.
 
Candidates should demonstrate excellence in all aspects of photo editing, including:
 
  • Daily leadership of a large staff of photo editors and photographers who work across the globe, covering all subjects.
  • Candidates should be able to maintain high journalistic standards and sustain a level of excellence that makes photography a core component of The Times’s identity.
  • Sophisticated news judgment and a compelling vision for how The Times can produce world-class journalism and innovative storytelling. We’re looking for a strong digital sensibility, including the ability to recognize emerging techniques and platforms and a clear understanding of how to define a modern photo desk.
  • Strong grasp of feature and portrait photography and the ability to improvise visual solutions for news coverage that may not be obviously visual.
  • Sharp eye for talent and ability to recruit a diverse, first-rate team of photo editors and photographers.
  • Strong management skills. Able to motivate and guide a large and complex organization, including responsibility for staff members in harm’s way.
  • Sophisticated sense of design and how photography contributes to the overall visual excellence of The Times.
  • Deep understanding of the collaborative nature of work in the Times newsroom.
  • Candidates should know how to maintain highly-productive relationships with other visual units including Video, Graphics, Design and development teams, and they should be able to develop strong relationships with reporters and news desk editors.
Apply to be the New York Times Photo Director
Post Date: 3/16/2018 11:28:23 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Adobe:
 
Creative ARR Exceeds $5 Billion in Q1 FY2018
 
March 15, 2018 – SAN JOSE, Calif. – Adobe (Nasdaq:ADBE) today reported strong financial results for its first quarter fiscal year 2018 ended March 2, 2018.
 
Financial Highlights
 
  • Adobe achieved record quarterly revenue of $2.08 billion in its first quarter of fiscal year 2018, which represents 24 percent year-over-year revenue growth.
  • Diluted earnings per share was $1.17 on a GAAP-basis, and $1.55 on a non-GAAP basis.
  • Digital Media segment revenue was $1.46 billion, with Creative revenue growing to $1.23 billion and Document Cloud achieving revenue of $231 million.
  • Digital Media Annualized Recurring Revenue (“ARR”) grew to $5.72 billion exiting the quarter, a quarter-over-quarter increase of $336 million. Creative ARR grew to $5.07 billion, and Document Cloud ARR grew to $647 million.
  • Digital Experience segment revenue was $554 million, which represents 16 percent year-over-year growth.
  • Operating income grew 50 percent and net income grew 46 percent year-over-year on a GAAP-basis; operating income grew 43 percent and net income grew 64 percent year-over-year on a non-GAAP basis.
  • Cash flow from operations was $990 million, and deferred revenue grew 25 percent year-over-year to approximately $2.57 billion.
  • Adobe repurchased approximately 1.6 million shares during the quarter, returning $301 million of cash to stockholders.
A reconciliation between GAAP and non-GAAP results is provided at the end of this press release and on Adobe’s website.
 
Executive Quotes
 
“Adobe’s outstanding growth is driven by enabling our customers to be more creative, work smarter and transform their businesses through our relentless focus on delivering innovation and intelligence across our solutions,” said Shantanu Narayen, president and CEO, Adobe.
 
“Our leadership in the large addressable markets we created, combined with Adobe’s leveraged operating model, contributed to another record quarter in Q1," said Mark Garrett, executive vice president and CFO, Adobe.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Category: Adobe News
Post Date: 3/16/2018 8:51:45 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
The University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland (HES-SO Valais-Wallis) has posted a behind-the-scenes look at capturing its latest class picture.
Post Date: 3/16/2018 7:52:31 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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