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 Tuesday, June 28, 2016
From Canon USA:
 
MELVILLE, N.Y., June 28, 2016 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced that the Canon Hollywood Professional Technology & Support Center currently located at 6060 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif., will be relocating to 3400 West Olive Ave., Burbank, Calif.
 
In this new central location, Canon will greatly enhance its already award-winning service and support to further assist the growing number of professional filmmakers and broadcast production clients in Southern California. The Burbank facility will also serve as a hub for product training, educational events, expedited repairs and hands-on technical support for Canon's business partners, rental houses and professional clients.
 
"Since our 2011 launch of Cinema EOS, Canon has been steadfastly committed to exceeding the high expectations of our professional clients in the production community. With this new facility, we reinforce that commitment to our professional imaging clients as well as our investment to support film and broadcast production. In Burbank, we will support our clients' productivity through a dynamic mix of product evaluation and testing, training, industry events and expedited repairs," said Yuichi Ishizuka, president and COO, Canon U.S.A., Inc. "Additionally, our new Burbank location will be yet another extension of Canon Professional Services' powerful support network for the region's professional photojournalists, fashion, studio, commercial and sports photographers."
 
The approximate date for completion of the move is early 2017.
Posted to: Canon News
Category: Canon USA News
Post Date: 6/28/2016 10:19:01 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the GigaPan EPIC Pro Robotic Camera Mount Kit available for $995.00 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $1,317.00.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Automatically Captures Panoramic Images
  • Gigapixel Panoramas w/Amazing Detail
  • For Camera & Lenses up to 10 lb (4.5kg)
  • Free GigaPan Stitch Software Download
  • Rechargeable Battery Pack & Charger
  • Digital Trigger Cables Included
Kit Includes
 
  • GigaPan EPIC Pro Robotic Camera Mount
  • Backpack w/Customizable Divider Panels
  • 3-Section Aluminum Tripod Legs
  • Spare Rechargeable 7.2V NiMH Battery
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/28/2016 8:56:08 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the Oben CT-3581 Carbon Fiber Travel Tripod with Ball Head available for $249.95 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $349.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Load Capacity: 26.4 lb
  • Maximum Height: 67.9"
  • Minimum Height 10.1"
  • Folded Length: 16.9"
  • Leg Sections: 5
  • Weight: 3.9 lb
  • Detachable Leg and Column Form Monopod
  • Rubber Feet & Retractable Metal Spikes
  • Arca-Type Quick-Release Plate
  • 2 x Bubble Levels
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/28/2016 8:19:40 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Image quality results from the Canon EOS 5Ds R, Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III and Canon EOS 7D Mark II have been added to the Samyang 14mm f/2.8 Lens (also branded as Rokinon, Bower, etc.) page.
 
The first comparison I wanted to see was the Samyang 14mm f/2.8 vs. the Canon 14mm f/2.8 L II Lens. The second was the Samyang 14mm f/2.8 vs. the Zeiss 15mm f/2.8 Lens. While the Samyang comes up short of these other two lenses from an images quality standpoint, it is a FAR lower-priced lens. Stopped down modestly, many are going to find the lower price to more than offset the modestly lower image quality. Especially those who only infrequently need a focal length this wide will find the Samyang a very attractive option.
 
A full review of the Samyang 14 is planned for the near future.
 
B&H has the Samyang 14mm f/2.8 Lens in stock. Note that the Nikon mount version of this lens is $50 more expensive than the Canon mount version, apparently due to the addition of a focus confirmation chip. Prices for other mounts vary.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/28/2016 7:53:09 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
From Canon:
 
Thank you for using Canon products.
 
It has been confirmed that when shooting still images with the EOS-1D X Mark II digital SLR camera launched in April 2016 with SanDisk CFast cards, the following phenomenon will occur. We would like to offer our sincere apologies to users who have been inconvenienced by this issue.
 
Phenomenon
 
If a SanDisk CFast card is inserted into the camera or a card reader, the bottom part of still images recorded may be corrupted. This phenomenon is confirmed in images recorded in both the RAW and JPEG formats.
 
  • In the RAW file, the image corruption may appear in the bottom right corner of the image.
  • In the JPEG file, the image corruption may appear in the lower third area of the image.
Please Note:
 
  • Movie recording is not affected by this phenomenon.
  • Still images or movies recorded to CF cards are not affected by this phenomenon.
Cause
 
This phenomenon is caused by SanDisk CFast cards. The camera does not cause this phenomenon.
 
Affected Products
 
Image corruption may be experienced with the cards listed below*:
 
  • SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 64GB (SDCFSP-064G-xxx)
  • SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 128GB (SDCFSP-128G-xxx)
  • SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 64GB (SDCFSP-064G-xxxA)
  • SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 128GB (SDCFSP-128G-xxxA)
  • SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 64GB (SDCFSP-064G-xxxB)
  • SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 128GB (SDCFSP-128G-xxxB)
* The “xxx” at the end of the product number varies depending on the sales region.
 
Market Support
 
Although it has been confirmed that this phenomenon is caused by SanDisk CFast cards, to prevent the occurrence of this phenomenon, Canon is considering releasing camera firmware on the Web for a download service in early July.
 
We would like to apologize for the inconvenience, but we would like to ask our customers to refrain from using SanDisk CFast cards when shooting still images until the new camera firmware becomes available.
 
Workaround
 
It is our understanding that image files of 16MB or larger recorded immediately before the camera’s power is turned off may become corrupted. Below are the methods available to help avoid image corruption when powering off the camera:
 
The Camera can be powered off in four ways:
 
  1. When the power switch is set to OFF
  2. When the card slot cover is opened
  3. When the power is turned off due to the Auto Power Off setting
  4. When the battery is removed
The phenomenon can be prevented by performing the procedure below:
 
Before powering the camera off, please take extra shots because the extra shots taken immediately before the camera is powered off may experience the corruption and not the images taken before the extra shots were taken.
 
The table below shows the most popular file types used and how many extra shots are recommended.
 
File Size (Approx.)How many extra shots
do I need to take in
order to meet the 16MB
or larger requirement?
[RAW] 23.2MB1
[JPEG] L:6.2MB3
[JPEG] M1:4.3MB4
[JPEG] M2:3.4MB5
[JPEG] S:2.2MB8

Thank you,
Customer Support Operations
Canon U.S.A., Inc.
B&H has the Miops Camera Trigger with Cable available for $167.49 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $207.49.
 
The device itself is universal, but you'll need to choose the kit that contains the correct cable for connecting to your camera.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Trigger Camera and/or Flash
  • Lightning, Laser, & Sound Trigger Modes
  • Smartphone App / Bluetooth Compatible
  • Time Lapse Function
  • HDR Function
  • External Port
  • Adjustable Sensitivity
  • Color LCD Screen
  • Rechargeable Li-Ion Battery
  • Includes Canon 3-Pin and PC Sync Cables
Note from Sean: If the Vello FreeWave Stryker left you unsatisfied with of its inability to capture lightning strikes under brighter conditions, you may want to give this Miops trigger a try.
 
The Miops trigger has been my go-to triggering device since February. While I have not been fortunate enough to capture a lightning strike atop the Savannah City Hall dome, the Miops trigger has proven very reliable in both dark and moderately bright conditions even with small bursts of lightning.
 
Lightning Over Savannah GA Miops Trigger

Aside from assiting in the capturing of lightning, the Miops trigger allows for many other triggering opportunities as well. For instance, I also used the device in the following image to remotely trigger my EOS 5D Mark III in continuous burst mode from a vantage point where spectators were not allowed (with prior permission, of course).
 
Cannon Firing at Fort Pulaski Miops Trigger

Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/28/2016 6:52:18 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the Lensbaby Spark Duo available for $89.95 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $139.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Spark 50mm f/5.6 Lens
  • Sweet Spot Selective Focus Lens
  • Multi-Coated Optical Glass Doublet
  • Minimum Focus Distance: 13"
  • Supports Lensbaby's Optic Swap System
  • Compatible with 37mm Accessories
  • Plastic 50mm f/2 Optic for Lo-Fi Look
  • Uncoated Double Convex Plastic Singlet
  • Magnetic Aperture Set
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/28/2016 6:16:25 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, June 27, 2016
From Cactus:
 
Go high-speed sync! Cactus launches the V6 II, a newest version of its popular Wireless Flash Transceiver to add cross-brand HSS and the V6 IIs, a dedicated Sony version.
 
Hong Kong, June Hong Kong, June 24, 2016 – After two years in the making, Cactus V6 II & IIs - the second generation of the World’s First cross-brand wireless flash transceiver, NOW supports high-speed synchronisation (HSS)! Besides the revolutionary remote power control of Canon, Fujifilm, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic and Pentax flashes all at the same time, the new models now support HSS / FP mode in the same cross-brand environment.1 This unique function gives photographers flexibility undreamed of. Matching flashes with same camera system for off-camera flash photography is over.
 
Two High-Speed Sync Modes
 
  1. 1. Normal HSS: Supports shutter speed up to 1/8000s.
  2. 2. Power Sync: Boosts flash contribution above camera’s x-sync speed, perfect
  3. for extreme conditions where Normal HSS is not powerful enough.
Cactus also extends HSS capabilities to Fujifilm cameras despite them not yet supporting high-speed sync at the time of writing.
 
AF-assist
 
Both the V6 II and IIs now has an automatic LED AF-assist light that makes autofocusing in dark environments possible – even in pitched-black! Besides the cameramounted V6 II/IIs, off-camera units will also activate the AF-assist light, which helps focusing even when camera is far from the subject.
 
V6 IIs for Sony
 
The dedicated Sony version – V6 IIs, embodies all the desirable functions of its sibling V6 II but with a Sony compatible hot shoe on the transceiver body, ensuring a seamless and secured connection with Sony cameras and flashes. Mounting the V6 IIs on a Sony Alpha camera allows the photographer to shoot above camera’s maximum x-sync speed and control power and zoom of Sony, including those with a Minolta/Sony hot shoe via an adapter, and other V6 II compatible flashes. 4 It is the perfect wireless flash trigger for existing and new users of Sony Alpha cameras, especially those who may still have non-Sony system flashes in their camera bags.
 
Highly Intelligent
 
V6 II and IIs can now auto-detect the on-camera portable flashes at device start-up by selecting the system the flash belongs to and assigning an Auto flash profile.
 
Similarly, the V6 II will auto-detect the camera and selects the system accordingly. This simple plug-and-play makes the setting up extremely quick and easy that both amateurs and professionals appreciate.
 
Expands Flash Compatibility
 
Remote zoom control now applies to all compatible TTL flashes, gives the photographer much quicker controls. Better still, previously unsupported digital TTL flash models on the V6 are now being supported.
 
Features at a Glance
 
  1. Cross-brand wireless manual power and zoom control with HSS support of Canon, Fujifilm, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Pentax and Sony flashes;
  2. Two cross-brand high-speed sync modes:
    • Normal HSS supports shutter speeds up to 1/8000s;
    • Power Sync boosts flash contribution above camera’s Power Sync x-sync speed;
  3. Multi-master supports up to 20 photographers firing the same set of flashes at their own power settings;
  4. AF-assist light assist light assist light assists focusing in low light environment;
  5. Flash profile customization ensures accurate power Flash profile customization output;
  6. Work seamlessly with the RF60 series to support HSS Work seamlessly with the RF60 series and Power Sync;
  7. Other useful features inherited from the V6 useful features inherited from the V6 useful features inherited from the V6 including:
    • Low Power
    • Absolute Power
    • TTL Pass-through
    • Group Sequence
    • Sport Shutter
    • Remote Shutter
    • Relay Mode
    • Delay Mode
    • Firmware Update support
Price and Availability
 
Cactus V6 II and IIs are currently scheduled to be available in 2016 July and August respectively and both are priced at US$95.00 (ex VAT).
 
B&H carries the original Cactus V6 Flash Transceivers.
Posted to: Canon News,
Category: Cactus News
Post Date: 6/27/2016 3:13:09 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
From LensRentals:
 
Happy 4th of July!
 
Renting gear for the long weekend? Save 15% on all orders arriving this week with code HAPPY4TH.*
 
To support this site, navigate to the appropriate product review and click the Rent button.
 
* Order must have arrival date between 6/27/16-7/1/16. Must use code HAPPY4TH.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/27/2016 12:17:38 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/27/2016 8:31:10 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Want to know more about DLSR infrared conversions? Look no further!
 
I've had my LifePixel IR-converted EOS 7D for about 8 months now and I've used it substantially over that time. An IR-converted camera has been an inspiring tool to have at-hand, and I've been able to create intriguing imagery that I never would have been able to create otherwise.
 
Check out our Infrared Camera Conversion by LifePixel Review for an overview of IR photography and how LifePixel can help you create unique imagery. [Sean]
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/27/2016 6:50:18 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
For today only, B&H has the Manfrotto Off Road Hiker 30L Backpack (Gray or Red) available for $69.95 with free shipping. Regularly $199.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Holds DSLR, 70-200 Zoom and Extra Lens
  • Removable Photo Insert with Zipper
  • Movable Touch-Fastening Dividers
  • Large Top-Flap for Weather Protection
  • Protective Rain Cover Included
  • Two Adjustable Shoulder Straps
  • Padded Adjustable Waistband for Comfort
  • Waist Band Pocket for Smartphone
  • Padded Nylon Mesh to Reduce Moisture
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/27/2016 5:17:58 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Sunday, June 26, 2016
The Canon EOS-1D X Mark II is an amazing camera, but I continue to use the Canon EOS 5Ds R a considerable percentage of the time. The primary benefit of the 5Ds R is its incredibly high resolution. Lighter weight, especially without the battery grip installed, is another advantage.
 
When planning my fawn photography trip to Big Meadows in Shenandoah National Park, I expected the higher resolution to be my preference and packed a pair of 5Ds R bodies along with many spare batteries. I also packed the 1D X Mark II, with expectations for this camera being more for additional in-the-field experience in support of the currently published review.
 
The Big Meadows meadow is thick with vegetation. Thick patches of thigh-high briars are found throughout and grass covers much of the balance of the meadow area. The grass is not exceptionally thick, but it sends stems and seed heads up rather high and there are few openings void of the tall grass.
 
While somewhat attractive, these seed heads create problem. The fawns are short – shorter than the grasses. While the fawn may be easily visible, a very high percentage of my fawn photos include a grass across an eye or blocking enough of the fawn's face to detract significantly from the image. With the sun at my back, the ideal lighting for wildlife photography, the grasses created shadows directly on the fawns and the shadows were just as detracting as the grasses themselves, creating double trouble. With careful timing, images could be captured when the fawn passes between the grasses. That is if the fawn was moving slowly and if the wind wasn't blowing.
 
The problem was that the fawns were seldom still or moving slowly and the grasses move in even the lightest wind, making accurate timing nearly impossible and even challenging with the fawn standing still. Compounding the problem was that grasses close to the camera were not so visible in the viewfinder, but they still contributed to a noticeable contrast reduction in the image. There are a lot of things to concentrate on when photographing a randomly moving animal (focus point selection to mention one) without having to keep track of blowing grasses and their shadows. Shooting from a higher position than ideal (ideal being level with the subject) was often helpful in getting above some of the grasses, but ... the 1D X Mark II's fast frame rate delivered a much greater number of keeper images than the 5Ds R was capturing.
 
Capturing images at 14 fps, there was often the right combination of body and grass positions in at least one of the frames from a burst. Or, subsequent frames captured so quickly could potentially allow portions of one image to be composited with the other, such as for removing an offending blade of grass.
 
I'm not sure if this fawn was playing or experimenting with a new food, but it was adorable for sure. I held the shutter release down for the short period of time it was holding the branch in its mouth. While I captured well over a dozen images, only one image gave me a clear view of the fawn's head.
 
Grass was my #1 nemesis in Big Meadows and was responsible for the delete button being pressed on thousands of images, but the 1D X II ensured that there were plenty of great shots remaining in the keeper folder.
 
Overall, the success of my three days in Shenandoah National Park was largely due to the 1D X II's capabilities. Even when the grass interfered visually, I was impressed at how adept the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II was at focusing on the fawn. Foreground obstructions are notorious for grabbing AF's attention, but very frequently the 1D X II figured out that the fawn was the real subject and remained locked onto it.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image. If you find these tips useful, please share them in your circle of friends!
 
Camera and Lens Settings
400mm  f/4.0  1/500s
ISO 2500
4705 x 3137px
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/26/2016 8:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Saturday, June 25, 2016
 Friday, June 24, 2016
The Ben Franklin Bridge in Philadelphia, PA has been on my to-photograph list for a long time and earlier this year, I was technically able to check this attraction off of my list (I decided to keep it on the list for images from a different angle).
 
Having not been to this location before (aside from driving across the bridge), I needed some daylight time to scout for the evening's photos. I knew the basics of the area based on my research, but onsite finalization of the plan is usually needed. Even though very far from the bay and roughly 90mi (150km) from the Atlantic Ocean, this location on the Delaware River is tidal. I knew that there was a tide and that the tide would be going out during my shooting time (incoming tides require more concern). What I didn't know was the significance of the water level change. My scouting determined that locations close to the early evening water appeared best and I had lots of flowing water in the foreground for the image I envisioned.
 
As prime time approached, I watched the water level rapidly decrease a significant amount until my side of the river became nearly empty. There was nothing I could do about the situation and I was not about to attempt walking out into the quicksand-like muck. As photographers must always be ready to do, I embraced what I had to work with. The good news is that, as the water level dropped far enough, I had wet mud and pools of water that nicely reflected the bridge and city, creating a look that I may like even better than the image I had visualized.
 
On a good day, Philadelphia is an over-3-hour drive for me. The ideal time of the day to photograph the city lights with at least a little color in the sky is only a small fraction of that time duration. Life is busy and when it comes to good images, more is rarely worse than less. If you are a professional photographer, you count on your images for your income. If your primary income is not generated by photography, you probably cannot spend as must time in the field as you wish. To maximize your image volume relative to effort expended, perhaps close to a doubling effect, run two complete camera setups.
 
If you read my Canon EOS 80D review, you saw an image showing one angle of the Ben Franklin bridge. With a very short period of time to capture images and each image taking approximately a minute to capture (a 15-30-second exposure followed immediately by a same-length long exposure noise reduction process), having at least a second complete camera and tripod setup nearly doubled my images for this evening. While the 80D and Canon EF-S 18-135mm IS USM came out of the MindShift Gear BackLight 26L later in the evening, I mostly used the 5Ds R and EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II on a Gitzo GT3542LS with an Arca-Swiss Z1, set up close to the bridge.
 
About 100' (33m) to the north, I had another 5Ds R mounted to an EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens on an Gitzo GT1542T Traveler with an Acratech GP-s Ball Head as my second primary camera and lens combination.
 
I very frequently utilize a pair of cameras when shooting landscapes and cityscapes before sunrise, after sunset or even when working with strong neutral density filters under bright sunlight. The process is simple. I find a unique composition for each camera. Upon finishing one camera's setup and triggering the shutter release, I run to the other camera (well, I sort-of ran and stumbled over the big rocks in this case) and did the same. By the time I return to the first camera, it is usually finished or nearly finished with its processing. I quickly evaluate the image captured, make any adjustments I feel are warranted and repeat the process.
 
If running two camera setups not immediately within reach, safety for the gear must be considered. I wouldn't call the area below the Camden, NJ side of the Ben Franklin Bridge the safest I've been in. It was dark, there were no other people around and I kept a very close eye on the second camera setup, watching for anyone sketchy approaching. Having the cameras setup this far apart gave me very different perspectives of the bridge and city vs. simply different framing of the same perspective. The 5Ds R would permit strong cropping to achieve a similar framing adjustment, so I wanted something completely different from the second camera.
 
With so many images that I like captured that evening, I struggled to pick out one to share (part of the problem of having perfectionist tendencies). Three months later, I forced myself to pick one. This was it. Hope you like it and hope even more that you can increase the number of great images that you capture.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/24/2016 10:11:18 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
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