Should I Get the Canon EOS 6D Mark II or the EOS 80D?

If you are currently in the process of upgrading DSLRs, or otherwise looking to add a second camera to your kit, the Canon EOS 6D Mark II and EOS 80D could be prime candidates for consideration.
 
Many people may be surprised to know just how similar the full-frame 6D Mark II and APS-C sensor 80D really are. Here's a quick rundown of the features these cameras share:
 
EOS 6D Mark II and 80D Shared Primary Features
 
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF Sensor
  • Compatible with EF, TS-E and MP-E lenses
  • AF System: 45 cross-type AF points (27 f/8 points [9 cross-type], center point is f/2.8 and f/5.6 dual cross-type)
  • AF Working Range: EV -3 - 18 (at 23 °C & ISO 100)
  • Flicker detection and anti-flicker shutter timing
  • Autofocus microadjustment
  • Up to 1920 x 1080 60fps movie recording
  • Movie Servo AF tracking speed and sensitivity adjustment
  • Single SD, SDHC or SDXC (UHS-I) memory card slot
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and NFC
Now let's take a look at some of the EOS 6D Mark II's advantages in this comparison.
 
Advantages of the EOS 6D Mark II over the EOS 80D:
 
  • Full-frame sensor
  • Higher resolution: 26.2 MP vs. 24.2
  • DIGIC 7 processor vs. DIGIC 6
  • Spot AF
  • Less noise, especially at higher ISOs
  • Dual-axis electronic level vs. single-axis
  • 4K time-lapse video recording
  • Built-in GPS and Bluetooth
  • Better battery life: Approx. 1200 vs. 960
And below are the primary advantages the EOS 80D has over its full-frame counterpart.
 
Advantages of the EOS 80D over the 6D Mark II:
 
  • Compatible with EF-S lenses
  • Slightly higher dynamic range
  • Slightly faster burst rate / larger buffer: Approx. 7fps, up to 25 images RAW vs. 6.5fps, up to 21 images RAW
  • Pop-up flash featuring master functionality
  • Faster max shutter speed: 1/8000 sec. vs. 1/4000
  • Faster max flash sync speed (x-sync): 1/250 sec vs. 1/180
  • Headphone terminal
  • Slightly smaller size / weight: 5.47 x 4.14 x 3.09" (139.0 x 105.2 x 78.5mm), 25.75 oz (730g) vs. 5.67 x 4.35 x 2.94" (144.0 x 110.5 x 74.8mm), 26.98 oz (765g)
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the EOS 6D Mark II?
 
If shooting in low light and using relatively high ISOs, the EOS 6D II will give you noticeably cleaner (less noisy) images at the same ISO setting. The full frame sensor will also create a stronger background blur with the same subject framing and aperture in use.
 
For those interested in movie shooting, the 6D II offers the benefit of in-camera 4K time-lapse recording, although it does not feature a true Tv/Av mode during video recording like most higher-end models (instead, the camera defaults to P mode where both the shutter and aperture are adjusted to maintain exposure) and a headphone socket for audio monitoring is unavailable.
 
If built-in GPS and Bluetooth are high on your priority list, the 6D II has those features while the 80D does not.
 
Who should opt for the EOS 80D?
 
If you are upgrading from an APS-C (crop) sensor camera and currently have several APS-C lenses in your kit, the EOS 80D offers a seamless transition without the need to upgrade your EF-S lenses to full-frame compatible EF lenses, a transition that could prove significantly more costly than a simple camera body upgrade. And the benefits of EF-S lenses include [typically] lower cost and smaller size/weight compared to their full-frame counterparts.
 
Those shooting fast action may not notice an appreciable difference in the burst rate between the two cameras; however, the larger buffer of the 80D could prove to be a differentiating factor in some situations. The 80D's higher pixel density offering more reach to those requiring longer focal lengths will be especially welcomed by photographers covering long field sports.
 
The AF point spread of the 80D covers a higher percentage of the viewfinder for optimal framing using traditional phase detect AF, although the use of Live View AF can mitigate the difference between the two bodies.
 
If you are interested in shooting using off-camera lighting, the 80D's pop-up flash with master functionality means that you may not need a costly accessory to control your off-camera flashes, with the reduced size and weight of your sans-accessory camera being another benefit.
 
If in-camera 4K time-lapse video is not important to you (you can always create 4K time-lapses in post), the 80D features the same video recording capabilities as the 6D II yet also features a headphone terminal for audio monitoring. Unless filming in low light using high ISOs is necessary for a bulk of your filmmaking, the 80D should work just as well for most with video production aspirations.
 
Summary
 
These cameras are actually more similar than they are different, with the sensor size probably being the most significant differentiating factor between the two cameras. If you're eager to enjoy the image quality benefits provided by a full-frame sensor, the 80D's benefits over the 6D Mark II won't likely tip the scales in the smaller sensor camera's direction.
 
However, if your budget is limited and/or you enjoy the benefits of EF-S lenses, or you otherwise want a body which offers a more versatile sports or video capture platform, the 80D's benefits may make it the logical choice for adding to your kit.
 
More Information
 
See our full list of Camera Gear Comparisons to aid in other purchasing decisions.
Posted: 8/9/2017 12:01:00 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Posted to: Canon News
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