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 Thursday, March 19, 2015
Adobe Logo
From the Adobe Lightroom Journal:
 
Camera Raw 8.8 is now available as a final release for Photoshop CS6 and Photoshop CC. DNG Converter 8.8 is provided for all Lightroom customers and Photoshop customers using versions of Photoshop older than Photoshop CS6.
 
New Camera Support in Camera Raw 8.8
 
  • Casio EX-ZR3500
  • Canon EOS 750D (Rebel T6i, Kiss X8i) (*)
  • Canon EOS 760D (Rebel T6s, Kiss 8000D) (*)
  • Fujifilm X-A2
  • Fujifilm XQ2
  • Hasselblad Stellar II
  • Nikon D5500
  • Olympus OM-D E-M5 II
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF7
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS50 (DMC-TZ70, DMC-TZ71)
(*) denotes preliminary support. Camera Matching color profiles for these models will be added in a future release.
 
New Lens Profile Support in Camera Raw 8.8 (only Canon / Nikon mount lens profiles shown here)
 
MountName
CanonCanon EF 24-85mm f3.5-4.5 USM
CanonCanon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM
CanonTAMRON SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD
Nikon FNikon AF NIKKOR 14mm f/2.8D ED
Nikon FNikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED VR II
Nikon FNikon AF-S NIKKOR 300mm f/4E PF ED VR
Nikon FNikon NIKKOR 50mm f/1.2 AIS
Nikon FTAMRON SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD A012N
Nikon FVoigtlander SL II 20mm f/3.5 Color-Skopar Aspherical
Nikon FVoigtlander SL II 28mm f/2.8 Color-Skopar Aspherical
Nikon FVoigtlander SL II 58mm f/1.4 Nokton

 
Release Notes
 
Bug Fixes:
 
  • Fixed issue with magenta highlights when processing Canon EOS 70D raw files at some ISO settings
  • Fixed issue where vignette correction introduced banding for Voigtlander VM 21mm f/1.8 Ultron
  • Fixed vignette overcorrection at certain focus distances for Pentax FA645 MACRO 120mm F4
  • Fixed issue where vignette correction introduced banding at wider focal lengths for Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED VR
  • Fixed EXIF name for Zeiss OTUS 85mm f/1.4 (Canon and Nikon mount)
  • Fixed vignette overcorrection for Zeiss Distagon T 1,4_35 ZM
  • Updated lens profile to reflect firmware changes to SIGMA 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM S014
If you have trouble updating to the latest ACR update via the Creative Cloud application, please refer to the following plugin installation:
 
http://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/multi/camera-raw-plug-in-installer.html
 
Lightroom Customers –
 
If you’re using one of the newly supported cameras listed above, please download the DNG Converter. We’re working to add support to these cameras and they will be added in the next Lightroom release.
 
Download Links
 
DNG Converter 8.8: Win | Mac
 
Adobe's Photoshop Photography Program is only $9.99 per month (Photoshop CC + Lightroom).
Post Date: 3/19/2015 2:05:21 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Reikan FoCal v2 Splash Screen
From Reikan:
 
Reikan has released a major update to its fully automated autofocus tuning software FoCal which provides autofocus fine tuning for both Nikon and Canon digital SLR cameras. Version 2 includes a unique ability for users to compare test results directly against results from other FoCal users around the world, helping to answer the age old question, "Is my camera/lens a good copy?".
 
Other highlighted features for Version 2 are routines to determine lens optical performance with an astigmatism metric and a large number of changes to the user interface to make calibration faster and FoCal easier to use.
 
Headline Features
 
  • Compare your results with other FoCal users – With FoCal 2, you can now compare the results of your tests with the results from thousands of other FoCal users to see how your equipment is really performing.
  • Review your previous tests – You can review the detailed results of previous tests you’ve run for comparison. This includes most of the tests you’ve run with FoCal 1 as well.
  • Improved Reports – The reports are now more concise, grouping relevant information together and showing more information that matters.
  • Faster Results – Get accurate results in less time with the new analysis algorithms in FoCal 2.
  • More Information – You can dig deeper into the performance of your camera and lens with the extra information such as Astigmatism Factor, as well as reviewing more details about each shot taken.
  • User Interface Improvements – the user interface is easier to understand, with new tabbed windows, more logical operation and comprehensive keyboard control.
  • Voice Prompts – FoCal 2 even talks to you! Calibrate any camera without needing to sit looking at the computer screen – any changes you might need to make at the camera are spoken out loud.
  • Free Upgrade – When fully released, FoCal 2 will be a free upgrade for all holders of a FoCal 1 license, so there’s nothing more to pay to get all these new features!
Find out more about FoCal v2 on the Reikan website.
 
Note: The software is currently only available for those who have FoCal v1.x Pro licenses.
Categories: Reikan News, FoCal News
Post Date: 3/19/2015 9:33:55 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens
Image quality results from the EOS 7D Mark II have been added to the Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens review.
 
As with yesterday's lens, the 18-135 STM is a decent performer, especially for the cost when purchased in a DSLR kit, refurbished or white box.
 
B&H has the Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/19/2015 8:53:56 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, March 18, 2015
Nikon Logo
From Nikon:
 
Modifications enabled with Ver. 2.21.0
 
  • Support for the D7200 has been added.
  • A Show ViewNX-i option has been added to the Tools menu.
  • A Show it with ViewNX-i option has been added to the When a new image is received from the camera item in the Transfer Options dialog accessed from the Tools menu > Transfer Options….
  • Windows Vista is no longer supported.
Download: Camera Control Pro v2.21.0
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 3/18/2015 12:27:38 PM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
Check out this great time lapse video created by photographer David Crewe of the Chicago River turning green in honor of St. Patrick's Day.
Post Date: 3/18/2015 10:15:31 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Total Solar Eclipse Mock-up
Residents of Norway and the Faroe Islands will be fortunate to see a solar eclipse on March 20. The eclipse will start at 07:41 UTC and run through 11:50 UTC with the maximum eclipse occuring at 9:45 UTC.
 
Some cities where at least part of the total eclipse will be visible:
 
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands, Faroe IslandsBarentsburg, Svalbard, Norway
Klaksvík, Faroe Islands, Faroe IslandsLongyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway
Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, Norway 

Some cities where partial eclipse will be visible:
 
Lisbon, PortugalBerlin, Germany
Madrid, SpainCopenhagen, Denmark
Dublin, IrelandOslo, Norway
Paris, FranceStockholm, Sweden
Nuuk, GreenlandAlert, Nunavut Territory, Canada
London, England, United KingdomTallinn, Estonia
Douglas, Isle of ManHelsinki, Finland
Brussels, BelgiumRovaniemi, Finland
Reykjavik, IcelandMoscow, Russia
Amsterdam, NetherlandsBelushya Guba, Russia

You can learn more about total solar eclipses at timeanddate.com or get tips on photographing them via Nikon's Learn and Explore.
Post Date: 3/18/2015 9:50:59 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Nikon Logo
From Nikon:
 
The following cameras can be used to update UT-1 firmware.
 
  • D810, D750, D7200, and D7100
  • D800 and D800E running A and B firmware Ver. 1.10 or later
* Only the camera(s) indicated above can be used to update UT-1 firmware.
* Firmware updates can be performed for you at authorized Nikon service centers.
 
Modifications enabled with firmware Ver. 2.3
 
  • Support for the D7200 has been added.
Download: Communication Unit UT-1 Firmware Ver. 2.3
 
B&H carries the Nikon Communication Unit UT-1.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 3/18/2015 8:44:56 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens
Image quality results from the EOS 7D Mark II have been added to the Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens review.
 
This light little lens is a great performer for the price.
 
B&H has the Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/18/2015 8:49:20 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Sekonic C-700 SpectroMaster Spectrometer
B&H has just published an in-depth look at the new Sekonic C-700 SpectroMaster Spectrometer on their Explora feed.
 
Sekonic C-700 Overview
 
  • Measures LED, HMI, and Fluorescent
  • Measures Tungsten, Natural Light, and Flash
  • 4.3" Touchscreen with 9 Display Modes
  • Displays Rosco, Lee, Fuji, Wratten Names
  • Displays CRI, White Balance Compensation
  • Multiple Light Comparison
  • CMOS Sensor and Linear Variable Filter
  • Stores 99 Full-data Measurements
  • Reads Color Temp. from (1,600-40,000K)
  • Reads 0.09 to 18,600 fc (1-200,000 lux)
Category: Sekonic News
Post Date: 3/18/2015 6:57:17 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From Canon Australia:
 
Sydney, Australia – March 18, 2015 – Canon Australia and National Geographic Channel have announced their partnership to deliver Australian viewers a new television series that gives rare insight into the eyes of some of Australia’s, and the world’s best photographic storytellers. Titled Tales by Light, the series will air in six episodes premiering from 8.30pm AEST Sunday May 24 on National Geographic Channel.
 
Tales By Light is the first television series produced by Canon Australia and is a natural progression for the photographic brand, explains Canon’s Director of Consumer Imaging and Executive Producer for the Series, Jason McLean:
 
“We see our role in imaging as enabling people to tell their stories, and what better than inspiring a large and passionate audience through the eyes of some of the best storytellers in the world. The partnership with National Geographic Channel is a perfect fit for us given their dedication to telling powerful stories through captivating imagery.”
 
Produced by emerging cinematographer and Canon Master, Abraham Joffe, Tales by Light showcases five of Australia’s, and the world’s, best photographers pushing the limits of their craft in some of the world’s most extreme and fascinating environments.
 
Each a master of their respective field, the photographers give rare insight into their endless journeys as visual storytellers – their challenges, motivations, and moments of joy in capturing an elusive moment by light. Shot in 4K resolution, the series is a stunning visual spectacle to immerse and inspire viewers through new ways of viewing the world around them.
 
“There is growing opportunity in strong, aligned brands partnering to amplify each other’s efforts and be innovative in media, especially,” says National Geographic Channel’s Managing Director for Australia and New Zealand Jacqui Feeney.
 
“Tales By Light is cool entertainment filmed in stunning 4K that appeals to our Nat Geo viewers. Both Canon and National Geographic Channel have shared values around the power of great imagery and technology being underpinned by great storytelling and reaching audiences in new and engaging ways. TV remains a powerful medium and storytelling is in our DNA so we were delighted to work with Canon on this new TV series.”
 
The Photographers
 
Art Wolfe has photographed for the world’s top magazines such as National Geographic, Smithsonian and GEO. Photographing creatures of the planet has been a major portion of Art’s life’s work spanning the past five decades. In the words of Sir David Attenborough: “Art Wolfe’s photographs are a superb evocation of some of the most breathtaking spectacles in the world.”
 
Darren Jew is one of the world’s leading marine photographers. He has forged an impressive career having shot for the likes of Tourism Australia, WWF (World Wildlife Fund) and the CSIRO. His knowledge of the ocean and its creatures coupled with his adventurous spirit, makes a brilliant subject to document.
 
Richard I’Anson is an acclaimed travel photographer, founder of Lonely Planet Images and the author of Lonely Planet’s Guide to Travel Photography. His work can be seen all over the world with hundreds of book titles featuring his photography. As a travel photographer, Richard lives and breathes his profession and has photographed in nearly 100 countries across all 7 continents.
 
Peter Eastway is an AIPP Grand Master of Photography best known for his exquisite landscape work. After learning his craft in the darkroom, he has embraced digital post-production to take a leading role in creating a new tradition of landscape photography. Peter's work continues to be published and exhibited internationally, including Qantas The Australian Way magazine.
 
Krystle Wright is a pioneering extreme sports photographer, driven by a passion to capture unique perspectives and increase the visibility of the most extreme sports and athletes. On a continual quest to challenge herself and others mentally and physically, Krystle achieves remarkable images that give insight into the demanding and beautiful world of adventure photography that few people get to see.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/18/2015 6:43:57 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, March 17, 2015
Sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens
B&H has just started shipping the long-anticipated Sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens for Canon.
 
I don't know if B&H has enough stock to meet the preorder demand, but now would be a good time to submit your order if you haven't already.
Post Date: 3/17/2015 4:13:15 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Nikon Logo
From Nikon:
 
Nikon Capture NX-D v. 1.2.0
 
Modifications enabled with Ver. 1.2.0:
 
  • Support for RAW images captured with the D7200 has been added.
  • An Open with ViewNX-i option has been added to the File menu.
  • An Open with ViewNX-i tool (icon) has been added to the toolbar.
  • When NEF-format images were converted to a different format after cropping, the portion of the image remaining after conversion did not always correspond to the actual crop applied. This issue has been resolved.
  • Windows Vista is no longer supported.
Download: Nikon Capture NX-D v. 1.2.0
 


Picture Control Utility 2.1.0
 
Updates included in this 2.1.0 download:
 
Updates that apply to both the Windows and Macintosh versions
 
  • Support for the D7200 and COOLPIX P900 has been added.
Updates that apply to the Windows versions only:
 
  • Windows Vista is no longer supported.
Download: Picture Control Utility 2.1.0
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 3/17/2015 11:46:57 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Capturing Cityscapes During the
Following Sean's recent winter photography tip suggestion, I took the Canon 11-24mm f/4L Lens to New York City for a late-winter day. New York City is one of the most photogenic cities on the planet and it remains similarly so at all times of the year. Advantages of shooting architecture and cities when it is uncomfortably cold out include fewer people to interfere with your compositions, fewer photographers competing for the same shooting locations and easier isolation of composition-enhancing people while doing street photography.
 
Scouting
 
New York City is extremely large and I doubt that anyone will ever exhaust all of the photo possibilities of this location. For sure I will not. This means that pre-trip scouting is especially important. Using available online resources to visualize the location's available compositions maximizes one's photo time. These resources include maps, satellite imagery, The Photographer's Ephemeris, reviewing photos others captured at the potential location, etc.
 
Part of this scouting involves determining the direction of sunrise or sunset as this effects the look of the image at a key time of the day for cityscape photography. The sun rising or setting to the side of an image will be the most challenging with the sky taking on a brightness gradient from one side of the image to the other. If the sun is rising or setting behind you, buildings will reflect the brighter sky and the background sky will be darker in relation to the buildings. The sky may also become pink above the horizon in this situation. If the sun is rising or setting in front of you, the sky will be brighter in relation to the buildings, but the building lights will become more pronounced. Both latter options are great. My choice in this example was the in-front-of-me sunset.
 
On Location
 
Arriving at the location early to verify the choice made during pre-trip scouting is highly recommended. You never know what you might find upon arrival (such as a large construction project), so arrive early enough to implement plan B if necessary. Yes, having at least a plan B and, better yet, a plan C and D is a very good idea. Arriving early also provides the best opportunity to score the perfect shooting location.
 
On this particular cold evening, there was no competition for shooting location and to completely avoid the chance of people walking into my composition (and to avoid an ugly sign and construction fencing), I setup so that no foreground was visible in the frame. To do so at the focal length I wanted to use (24mm – the longest available on the lens I was evaluating) required extending my tripod down through the curved East River fencing.
 
The Right Time of Day Makes the Difference
 
City lights do not come on (or become visible) until it gets somewhat dark and these lights are a key to one of my favorite cityscape looks. The lights add life to the buildings and while cityscapes can be captured in complete darkness, I find that some color remaining in the sky makes a better image.
 
The "Blue Hour", by definition, lasts for 1 hour just before sunrise and just after sunset (use your online tool or phone app to find out when it happens at your shooting location on your chosen shooting day). However, the perfect shooting time, when the sky color balances with the city lights (and possibly reflections), lasts for closer to 15 minutes within that hour. I'll dub this time period the "Perfect 15" and I can usually narrow my ultimate preference down to a subset of that duration. While the Perfect 15 are ideal for capturing a variety of image types, cityscapes are an especially great use of this short period of time.
 
While it is possible to capture a number of compositions within the Perfect 15, I find it best to concentrate on one composition at the key time of the day. Fifteen minutes sounds like a very adequate amount of time to capture one image, but I assure you, it is often not. Here is why:
 
At this time of the day, each f/11 image requires 30 seconds of exposure (roughly) followed by 30 seconds of long exposure noise reduction dark frame capture. Add a few seconds for mirror lockup and multiply each shot by two or three for exposure bracketing (if warranted for HDR) and those Perfect 15 minutes begin to look very short.
 
Reflect a Great Scene for a Better Image
 
Want to make a great scene even better? Reflect it in water to double the greatness. Many major cities exist because of the water located by them, and cityscapes often look best when reflected in water. However, these waterways are typically large enough and have enough wind and boat traffic on them to never permit a mirror-smooth reflection. Reflections in rough water can look OK (though somewhat distracting), but making a smooth blur of the water via a long exposure is usually my preference. The Perfect 15 happens at the right time of day for long water-blurring exposures, but the boat traffic presents a problem.
 
Even during a 30 second exposure, the waves created by a large boat are going to create possibly-undesirable lines in the final image. Also, at this time of the day, boats are required to have lights on and those lights show very clearly as long streaks in the image. Sometimes these light streaks can be removed in post processing (try the content-aware healing brush in Photoshop), but lights on the larger boats (such as ferries) streak across the city details, becoming much more difficult to remove. When this happens, an available option is to simply leave the light streaks remaining in the final image, adding an effect. Most of the time, I find this effect undesirable. Correcting the uneven reflections caused by 30-second wave blurs is usually very challenging.
 
The Perfect 15 is Short for Even One Image
 
So, in addition to the over-1-minute exposure captures along with similar durations for exposure bracketed shots (for potential HDR use), a boat moving through an image can cut the remaining available time drastically. A tug boat pushing a barge through the Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Skyline scene takes a couple of minutes and the waves don't settle for a period of time after that. The East River Ferry is much faster, but it also makes significant waves. Boat traffic alone took a major chunk out of my Perfect 15 on this day.
 
Does the Tide Matter?
 
If your city's waterway is tidal-influenced and water-level subjects, especially in the foreground (such as pilings), are in your frame, make sure that your capture date is ideally timed with the tide. Use the tide charts available for your location to determine this.
 
The Weather Matters
 
If it were raining, snowing or foggy, I would not likely have been able to see the city I was photographing, so yes, the weather matters. Aside from being able to see the primary subjects, what the weather is providing becomes decreasingly important for cityscape photography at these times of the day. If you want the sunset to add a significant interest to the sky, there needs to be some clouds to catch color and an opening in the sky allowing the sun to illuminate those clouds. Since I wanted the city itself to be the primary interest in my image and because I wanted a high-percentage weather forecast, I chose a perfectly clear day for this trip. A clear sky provides a great blue color over the city and reflects in the water below it.
 
Seeing Stars and Aircraft
 
Cities are usually bright enough to overwhelm the visibility of most stars, but if you happen to be able to see the stars in your images, 30 seconds is probably going to give you some star trails. What to do with the handful of visible stars and their short trails is a matter of taste, but they appeared to be an anomaly in this image. There were not enough stars showing to make them appear as part of the scene, so I removed them.
 
Along with waterways, large cities usually have busy airports and air traffic very frequently becomes part of these images. The flashing lights from this aircraft generally create long dotted lines through a cityscape captured during 30 the seconds exposures typically in use during the Perfect 15. Again, the choice of what to do about these inevitable additions to the image is up to you. Fortunately, most of the aircraft are flying above the city and can be easily removed in Photoshop.
 
Replacing Light Bulbs
 
The waterways commonly found by large cities frequently have bridges over them. These bridges are often landmarks that you will want to incorporate into your images and these bridges commonly have many lights on them. The Brooklyn Bridge is one such bridge. After a severe winter, numerous light bulbs were in need of replacement. I'm sure that there had been very few maintenance crew members volunteering to scale the bridge under the severe temperatures (along with plenty of snow and ice) NYC had for many months prior, but I felt the missing lights negatively impacted the image and took the liberty of replacing the bulbs myself (in post of course).
 
Note that, while often the highest location in a city, bridges would seem to be great vantage points for cityscape photography during the Perfect 15. Unfortunately, for bridges with traffic on them, this is not the case. The amount of movement on most bridges with vehicular traffic is incredible (especially the large suspension bridges) and long exposure images captured from such bridges are typically very blurry.
 
This New York City Image
 
While reviewing the Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM Lens, I wanted to put some on-location hours behind this lens and decided that Brooklyn Bridge Park, just across the East River from downtown Manhattan, would be a good destination. I arrived early in the afternoon, spent an hour or so selecting what I thought was the ideal composition for capture during the Perfect 15 and then explored the area for other photographic opportunities.
 
About 45 minutes before sunset, I came back and anchored myself into the selected shooting location. I setup the camera, perfected the framing using a completely level camera (keeping the buildings vertically straight) and then established the proper focus distance setting. While I have yet to take a miss-autofocused image with this lens, I wanted no chance of that happening when the scene became dark. I used autofocus to get the initial setting, switched to manual focus mode and took a verification image.
 
While my selected image was captured 41 minutes after sunset, I captured images periodically before entering the Perfect 15. Some of these images are very nice and I'm glad to have them. More importantly, these images allowed me to monitor the exposure settings and how they were changing. There was no question about what settings I should be using when the ideal shooting time came.
 
While I did some bracketing and captured many exposures before, through and after the Perfect 15, everything came together in one image this time. The boat traffic stopped long enough for the waves to even out. The brightness in the sky leveled with the brightness of the city lights and the brightness of the reflection seems just right to me.
 
Aside from some of the tweaks I mentioned already (such as replacing burned out light bulbs), this image is basically right out of the camera. I shoot with the Neutral Picture Style selected in-camera to get a lower contrast histogram to best show the camera's available dynamic range and how I'm making use of it. Because this style's low contrast is not typically what I'm processing for, my usual first post processing step is to select Standard Picture Style. I added some saturation and turned the sharpness setting down to "1". Even with a very low "1" sharpness setting, all details in this image are tack sharp. Awesome lens.
 
Other "Perfect 15" Cityscapes
 
A few other recent cityscape images can be found here:
Pilings, Brooklyn Bridge Park, NYC Skyline at Sunset
Capturing the Spirit of Baltimore's Inner Harbor
Manhattan Skyline and Hamilton Park
 
Summary
 
A majority of photographers and other observers pack it in when the sun dips below the horizon, but the show is just getting started at sunset. Stick around. If the sun is visible in the sky, unfortunately, the best AM photo time may be in the past. This is the time to make plans for tomorrow. Try shooting during the blue hour and learn what your "Perfect 15" is.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Google+, Flickr and Facebook. Also, if reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
Post Date: 3/17/2015 10:18:52 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Nikon ViewNX-i Software Overview
Nikon's new image browsing software – ViewNX-i – is now available for download.
 
ViewNX-i Features
 
  • Quick switching between the browser, map display, and Web services using tabs
  • An Output Toolbar that enables quick access to easy-to-use functions, including image editing with Capture NX-D, movie editing with ViewNX-Movie Editor, printing, and image upload
  • A variety of display formats, including vertical and horizontal thumbnail display and display of two images for comparison, that can be easily used as needed
  • Simple shooting information display with a layout familiar to users of digital SLR cameras
  • Photo Tray function in which still images and movies from multiple folders can be temporarily stored for quick and easy access
  • Smooth upload of files to Facebook, YouTube, and NIKON IMAGE SPACE
  • Flexible RAW development and image adjustment using Capture NX-D, which can be accessed directly from ViewNX-i (collaboration between the two applications will be strengthened with the addition of a button that returns operation to ViewNX-i to Capture NX-D Ver. 1.2.0 and later)
  • Support for the sidecar file format for movies enables the application of ratings and specification of playback range without modifying the original movie file
  • Movie editing functions that enable creation of original movies, movie trimming, combining of multiple photos and movies into a single movie, and saving of individual movie frames as still images with simple operations (collaboration with ViewNX-Movie Editor)
Posted to: Nikon News
Category: Nikon ViewNX
Post Date: 3/17/2015 7:59:00 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Lowepro Fastpack 150 and 250 AW II Backpacks
PETALUMA, Calif., March 16, 2015 — Lowepro, the leading maker of photography carrying solutions, today unveiled the next generation of its trusted, travel-centric camera and laptop backpacks: the Fastpack II series. These versatile packs are designed to provide the modern traveler with quick, easy access to their camera, laptop and other devices while maximizing storage space and device protection for travel.
 
“Our trusted Fastpack series is designed to give avid travelers easy access to their laptops and camera gear in addition to the growing number of other devices they want available on the road,” said Tim Grimmer, vice president of brand and product at Lowepro. “Photography and device enthusiasts trust Fastpack’s easy-access compartments and well-designed organization to fulfill all their needs from business trips to events, personal excursions, day trips or extended travel. The latest generation of the Fastpack series improves device protection and provides increased utility essential for modern travel.”
 
The Fastpack II series includes two new packs for the DSLR photographer: the Fastpack 150 AW II and the Fastpack 250 AW II. Each pack features a padded easy-access compartment for a DSLR camera with lens. New additions to this generation include an all-weather protective cover to keep gear safe no matter the weather or destination, and the ability to secure the pack to rolling trolleys for easy airport maneuvering. The Fastpack 150 AW II is designed to hold up to an 11-inch laptop in a dedicated, padded device zone, and one to two extra lenses or flashes in the camera zone; and the larger Fastpack 250 AW II can hold a 15-inch laptop, plus up to three additional lenses or flashes. Both packs come complete with a padded, removable waistbelt for extra comfort that can be stashed during travel.
 
Additional features of the Fastpack II series include a device zone with CradleFit tablet protection, an open zone for additional equipment and a tall stretch-mesh side pocket that can secure tripods. Each pack can safely hold smartphones, headphones, keys, accessories and a hard drive in addition to a camera, laptop and tablet.
 
B&H has the Lowepro Fastpack AW II backpacks available for preorder.
Category: Lowepro News
Post Date: 3/17/2015 7:36:49 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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