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 Thursday, July 28, 2016
by Sean Setters
 
There are few simple joys in life that surpass witnessing a beautiful sunrise, a fog-laden valley or a majestic mountain with snow-capped peaks. However, to capture the magnificence of the outdoors, there are a few accessories that every landscape photographer should have at hand.
 
1. Circular Polarizing Filter
 
If I had to pick the most important landscape accessory, the venerable circular polarizer would be an easy choice. Not only can a circular polarizer give you rich, dark blue skies, but it can also allow you to dial in just how much surface reflection you want in water scenes. No other item on this list will have as much of an impact on your landscape photography than a CPOL. If you want better landscape photos and it's not already part of your kit, make a CPOL your next photography purchase. Our particular favorites are B+W XS-Pro circular polarizers. Their rims are wide enough to use standard lens caps but not too wide to cause vignetting.
 
2. ND Filter(s)
 
Sometimes captivating landscape photographs require longer-than-normal exposures times. Want blurred water in your waterfall pictures? How about clouds streaking across the sky? Unless the ambient light is relatively low, you'll need a neutral density filter to restrict the amount of light reaching your camera's sensor.
 
ND filters come in two basic flavors – solid and variable. Solid NDs have been around for decades and feature a fixed opacity. The opacity rating can be a bit confusing, though. For instance, an ND that blocks 10-stops of light can be listed as a "10-stop filter," "3.0 filter" or "ND1000." Just for the sake of clarification, here's a reference table below:
 
Stopsx.xNDx
20.6ND4
41.2ND16
61.8ND64
82.4ND256
103.0ND1000

So why isn't a 10-stop ND referred to as an ND1024? Your guess is as good as mine.
 
In addition to solid ND filters, variable ND filters are also available. The benefit of a variable ND is that you can dial in the exact amount of density you want for a specific need. That means a typical variable ND filter can replace a 2-stop, 4-stop, 6-stop and 8-stop filter thereby reducing the amount of gear needed for a given landscape adventure. The downside is that variable ND filters are thicker than their solid ND counterparts and may cause strong vignetting (especially on wide-angle lenses).
 
When it comes to solid ND filters, Breakthrough Photography's X4 filters came out tops in Bryan's tests. As for variable NDs, Singh-Ray makes some of the best, but they are extremely pricey (and even that may be an understatement). I own the Singh-Ray Vari-N-Duo, a combination variable ND and circular polarizer, and love it. However, its width makes it impossible to use at wide focal lengths without hard vignetting. If I were in the market for a variable ND right now, I'd probably pick up the B+W XS-Pro ND Vario MRC-Nano. It's still pricey, but compared to the Singh-Ray, a definitely more wallet-friendly.
 
Before we get off the topic of ND filters, let's address the issue of color casts. Most ND filters will introduce some sort of color cast in your image. To counteract this, shoot a properly exposed test image of a color calibration target (like the X-Rite ColorChecker Passport Photo) in the same light as your landscape and calibrate colors in post processing.
 
3. Lightweight Tripod and Head
 
While just about any focal length can be advantageous for landscape photography, very few photographers will prefer carrying around big white supertelephoto lenses for landscape use. As such, a landscape-oriented tripod can be smaller and lighter with a low-to-moderate load capacity. We generally prefer to purchase a tripod with a maximum load capacity at least twice what we intend on using on the tripod to ensure optimal stability. For my own general landscape use, that translates to a tripod with a load capacity rating of around 15 lbs.
 
How'd I arrive at that number? Well, my typical landscape setup includes a gripped 5D Mark III with an L-bracket and an EF 17-40mm f/4L IS USM with the hood attached. That combination tips the scales at 4 lb 10 oz (note including the weight of any filters being used). While that may be a "typical" setup, I want the tripod to be able to support my 70-200mm f/2.8L IS as well (should the focal range be desired), and that combination weighs in at 7 lb 8 oz.
 
Arguably the three most important factors for choosing a tripod for landscape use are size, weight and load capacity. While there are many great landscape vistas within a short walk from available parking, the vast majority of breathtaking views require at least some hiking to reach. As such, the benefits of a lightweight, compact tripod seem to be augmented with each step required to arrive at your ultimate destination.
 
When it comes to lightweight, compact, high-quality tripods, Gitzo Traveler and Mountaineer carbon fiber tripods are hard to beat. Unfortunately, they feature a price tag that may be difficult to justify unless you consider landscapes to be a primary photography interest. Other tripods you may want to look at in this market are the Benro Travel Angel, Oben Travel and Manfrotto Manfrotto 190go!-series tripods.
 
As travel tripods are not designed with ultimate in load capacities in mind, you don't necessarily need the highest-spec'd head on top of it. While the Arca-Swiss Monoball Z1 is our favorite ball head, it's anything but lightweight. Considering that my needs above dictated a tripod with a load capcity in the neighborhood of 15 lb, putting a ball head on top which can support 130 lb may be the definition of "overkill."
 
One of the best ball heads for travel tripods is the Acratech GP-ss Ballhead with Lever Clamp. Reasons why we like it: 1) it's lightweight at 0.84 lb, 2) has a load capacity rating of 25 lb, 3) features an Arca-style lever release clamp on top and 4) is compatible with tripod legs which fold up beyond the ball head (relatively common with travel tripods) and 5) it looks really cool. Ok, so that last benefit doesn't really matter from a landscape perspective, but still...
 
With lower load capacity requirements, there are many ball heads that can fill the role of a travel head. Weighing in at only 1 lb, the Oben BC-126 would be a lower-end but quite reasonably spec'd option.
 
Of course, if reduced size and weight are not important for your landscape photography needs, any high quality tripod and ball head will work.
 
4. Hiking Backpack
 
When it comes to choosing a backpack for landscape photography, there are a few things to keep in mind:
 
  1. How much gear will you want to travel with? This includes cameras, lenses, filters, miscellaneous accessories and a tripod.
  2. Does the backpack have a waistbelt? The longer you plan on traveling with the pack, the more advantageous a good padded waistbelt becomes. Be sure that the waistbelt sits on your hips at a comfortable spot for supporting your camera gear load.
  3. How easy is it to access the camera? Some backpacks allow you to access gear without fully removing the pack. Most require removal for access to gear.
  4. Is the backpack capable of handling inclement weather? Is a rain cover included?
  5. How is the tripod attached? Some may prefer side-mounting while others will prefer the more even weight distribution afforded by straps running along the back of the pack.
Exactly which bag is right for you will depend on your own preferences, but... we're a big fan of MindShift Gear's Rotation 180 Professional. Its design seems extremely well suited for those who may want to hike several miles to capture unique landscapes. If the Rotation 180 isn't to your taste, check out Bryan's other reviews of camera backpacks.
 
5. LCD Viewfinder Loupe
 
This is one of those items that you can't imagine living without after you've added one to your kit – an LCD Viewfinder Loupe. Whether focusing at 10x Live View or checking an image preview on the LCD screen, the loupe blocks out all extraneous light so that you see things clearly. While we certainly advise using the histogram to aid in determining exposure settings, being able to see the LCD without glare can help you get a better sense of the tones in your image and how they relate to one another.
 
My particular favorite LCD viewfinder loupe is the Hoodman Compact HoodLoupe Optical Viewfinder for 3.2" LCD Screens which I use with a 5D Mark III and 7D Mark II. I like it because it works well and compacts down into a relatively small space.
 
Well, that's our Top 5 Landscape Accessories. Was there another piece of gear that deserved to be included but wasn't? Let us know in the comments.
 
Site Visitor Suggestions:
 
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 7/28/2016 7:39:49 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, July 20, 2016
East coast beaches are usually better situated for sunrises than sunsets and Island Beach State Park, just south of Seaside Park in New Jersey, is usual in this regard.
 
A habit I have while photographing at the edges of the day, is to make regular glances to the east, "watching my back". While that habit may apply to safety in some locations, I'm referring to the lighting and color in the sky. It is natural for us to watch and photograph the sun rising or setting, but often great images are found behind you at these times of the day.
 
While photographing the colorful post-sunset sky to the west on this evening, I took that glance to the east. What I saw was that the color in the sky was visible toward the north while the rest of the easterly scene was very evenly lit. The ultra-wide 14mm focal length lens' angle of view was sufficient to capture that color along with the Atlantic Ocean and lots of sand in the foreground. To add some foreground interest, I moved in close to the sand fence post, placing it approximately 1/3 into the frame with the beach fishing party framed between it and the dunes to the left.
 
While the lighting was rather even, I still used a combination of three 1-stop-different exposures combined via a manual HDR process to darken the brightest portion of the sky relative to the rest of the beach scene.
 
Capturing a colorful sky is just one of the many reasons that your kit should have 14mm covered.
 
While the Samyang/Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC Lens is a great deal at regular price, the Canon mount version is a killer deal right now at B&H. Use promo code PSWBH16 to save $40.00 on the Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC Lens for Canon. Free expedited shipping is included.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 7/20/2016 8:34:01 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, July 19, 2016
Sometimes, it's all about the ears. The white-tailed deer mother cleaning its fawn's ear in the bright green grass of Big Meadows, Shenandoah National Park was just too cute to not share.
 
As I have mentioned before, photographing white-tailed deer in Big Meadows is very challenging. Though I took a lot of photos in my few days there, some quickly stand out over the rest to me. In addition to the cuteness factor, I liked this frame for a couple of reasons. The first is because of the relatively evenly colored bright green grass framing and strongly-contrasting the animals – but not obstructing them. I also like the balanced overall position of the animals. And, all the eyes are sharp.
 
One of the big challenges to photographing moving animals is often keeping the proper AF point(s) selected and when an animal changes direction, the proper AF point may be on the opposite side of the viewfinder. If the primary subject's eyes are not in focus, the image will likely end up in my recycle folder. This means that keeping the selected focus point(s) on the primary subject's eyes is more important than maintaining ideal subject framing. Getting both right is the goal of course, but I am more likely to delete an image because the eyes are out of focus than because the framing isn't perfect. Cropping can often solve the latter issue.
 
While I concentrated on keeping the ideal AF point selected and placed on the subjects (the doe's nose in this case – to keep both sets of eyes in focus), the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II's high speed burst mode took care of catching the frame of what seems like the ideal ear position in both animals.
 
Seeing and capturing too-cute moments like this one feed the addiction!
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
400mm  f/5.6  1/640s
ISO 800
4450 x 2967px
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 7/19/2016 9:58:13 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, July 15, 2016
by Sean Setters
 
While working with The-Digital-Picture.com has enabled me to become competent in a variety of photographic disciplines, I always find myself coming back to my first love – portraiture. The look on someone's face when they see themselves in a whole new light [pun intended] is such a joy for me.
 
But alas, there are some types of portraiture I'm just not that interested in pursuing. If someone wants their 2-3 year-old photographed, I will gladly refer them to someone else. Being 34 and not a father, I never acquired the patience it takes to photograph young children. For those who can create great pictures with kids of that age group, I tip my hat to you. But as for me, there are three things I look for in clients:
 
My ideal clients...
 
  • must be able to follow directions.
  • actually desire having their picture taken.
  • are interested in creating unique and/or creative imagery.
For the longest time, high school seniors have been the group that I preferred working with most. High school seniors are young, exuberant and usually excited at the idea of standing out from the pack. And with high school graduation being such an important event in one's life, a graduate-to-be's parents are typically willing to mark the occasion with a significant photo investment. All of these factors make high school senior photography very attractive to me (as well as many others).
 
But it wasn't until this week that I realized another, fairly untapped market existed that also met all the criteria for my ideal client – those with online dating profiles.
 
We've previously promoted the importance of creating an eye-catching self-portrait for the purpose of online dating, and even the CDLC provided some self-portrait tips specifically for this purpose. But until recently it never occurred to me to mention this as an available service to potential clients.
 
With that in mind, let's take a look at our potential market. In 2014, census data showed that 45% of Americans over the age of 18 were unmarried. That's about 107 million Americans. Large market – check! And with a seemingly increasing number of single Americans being older and educated, my guess is that here is a lot of disposable income at stake.
 
From a consumer's perspective, putting your best foot forward in the form of an attractive profile picture is the easiest way to generate interest in your profile (more interest = greater odds in finding an ideal partner). Your first impression – that little profile picture – is big factor in causing potential partners to click "View More Details." And after your detailed profile has been explored, more great images can further increase interest. Let's face it – physical attraction is a part of life (thankfully!).
 
From a photographer's perspective, if we can help people find their soul mates while making money at the same time, everyone wins. The relatively small investment for a portrait session tailored for online dating may turn out to be the most gratifying and fulfilling investment the client ever makes.
 
And that brings us to Teddy. Teddy is 40 years-old, single, has a good job and has recently tried online dating. He's been on a few dates over the last couple of months and his dates always noted that he "...looked better in person than he did in his profile pictures." Armed with that feedback, Teddy hired me to take a variety of pictures to replace the iPhone snapshots he was currently using.
 
Being relatively new to the Savannah area, Teddy temporarily rents the third floor of a large, beautifully decorated home. With lots of interesting rooms to work with, choosing to shoot inside the common areas of the home was an easy decision. And while I packed quite a bit of gear, I ended up using only the following items:
 
Using a two-speedlite setup allowed me to easily move to different areas throughout the common areas of the home that he and his landlord share. Following are some of my favorite images from the roughly 2-hour session:
 
Teddy Profile Picture 2-3

Teddy Profile Picture 4

Teddy Profile Picture 5-6

Overall, Teddy was extremely pleased with his images and quickly changed his Facebook profile picture to one of the images above soon after delivery. I assume his dating profile images were updated around the same time.
 
In short, the online dating market is growing because of social and cultural factors, and the proliferation of mobile devices means this market is poised to be very strong for the foreseeable future. Adding dating profile pictures to your advertised list of services will likely generate clients that are easy to work with and eager to get the most out of their session. And maybe best of all, you can help someone find a companion for life while doing something you enjoy. That's rewarding for everyone.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 7/15/2016 5:09:45 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, July 13, 2016
by Sean Setters
 
The bright, sunny days of spring, summer and fall present perfect image-making opportunities when you have an infrared converted camera in your gear bag. For me, that camera is an EOS 7D converted by LifePixel with a Super Color IR sensor.
 
While conventional photographic wisdom dictates that the golden hours just after sunrise and before sunset are ideal times for image-making, those with an IR camera at hand can take full advantage of midday sun to create compelling IR images. This IR benefit came in handy a couple of weeks ago.
 
Seeing a beautiful blue, midday sky overhead on my way to the mailbox around 1pm, I decided to head out with the IR camera to a spot I had filed in the back of my memory. It was a small parking area off of Victory Dr. on the way to Tybee Island from Savannah, GA. After arriving at the location, I photographed various scenes for about a half hour before ultimately deciding it wasn't as photogenic as I had thought (or maybe my creative skills simply weren't doing it justice on that day). With my tail between my legs, I headed home.
 
However, on my return trip I spotted an interesting dock area to my right on the other side of the bridge that crosses the Wilmington River. After turning off the main road, I worked my way back to the dock and found that it was a public park – W.E. Honey Park, to be exact – and the dock I had seen from the bridge was easily accessible.
 
I parked and attached the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM to the EOS 7D to allow for a wide range of framing opportunities from the dock. I also attached a B+W Circular Polarizer to the lens to see how it might impact the image. After several attempts to capture the bridge as seen from the dock, I turned around to photograph a small river winding its way through the marsh with lots of clouds near the tree-lined horizon. After returning to my vehicle, I realized that my normal custom white balance may not be optimal with the circular polarizer attached. As such, I pulled out my X-Rite ColorChecker Passport and photographed its white balance target in direct sunlight with the CPOL attached for color correction purposes in post processing.
 
As I do with all my images captured in IR, I set the white balance in Digital Photo Professional and then exported a TIFF into Photoshop CC. There, I view the image a few different ways to see which post processing technique I feel best suits the scene.
 
Here's what the image looked like straight out of the camera with only an Auto Levels applied:
 
Wilmington River in Super Color IR Auto Levels Only

While I find that non red/blue channel flipped images may work well for some portraits, I rarely find the nearly straight out of camera approach well suited for landscapes.
 
Let's try another technique. Below I've applied Auto Levels, swapped the red and blue color channels and desaturated the yellow color of the foliage.
 
Wilmington River in Super Color IR Desaturated Yellows

The above represents a more typical IR photo, albeit with blue color in the sky and in the water. While this image looks much better than the straight out of camera example, I decided to leave the Yellow channel untouched in the final image above so that there was a clear separation between the clouds and the tree line. The circular polraizer that was used seemed to create an even more intense blue in the scene compared to images taken without the filter in place.
 
I've been really happy having an IR-converted camera in my kit these past few months. It's been a great investment for me and a fitting use for a DSLR which would have seen little use after upgrading to 7D Mark II. And the great thing about the Super Color IR sensor option, in particular, is that I gain great flexibility in creating multiple image styles from the same capture.
 
Ready to learn more about infrared camera conversions? Take a look at our Infrared Camera Conversion by LifePixel Review.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 7/13/2016 11:07:11 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, July 8, 2016
by Sean Setters
 
Before I go any further, I must make one thing very clear:
 
  • The image above [closely] resembles the image I had intended to capture. It does not represent the reality of the event.
Backstory
 
Having never attended an Independence Day celebration on Savannah's River Street before, I asked several people where exactly the fireworks were launched from. I was told the fireworks launched from behind the Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort & Spa on the other side of the Savannah River. Therefore, my plan was to position myself on the east end of River Street near Belles Ferry, where I hoped I could include the Westin hotel and possibly a small portion of the Talmadge Memorial Bridge in my fireworks image.
 
The fireworks were scheduled for 9:30pm. Expecting a sizable crowd on River Street, my goal was to pack my gear so that it was minimally cumbersome and as light as possible. I knew that shooting fireworks would require some type of support, but the idea of carrying a full tripod downtown (even if affixed to the outside of my backpack) did not appeal to me. In this particular case, I didn't think my very-travel-friendly Feisol TT-15 Mini Carbon Fiber would be a feasible option as I would likely have to utilize one of the concrete supports positioned by the river as the base, and having my camera atop a tiny tripod next to a river did not sound like a good idea. I wondered if I could cobble together a few odds and ends from around the house that could do the job.
 
So here's the solution I came up with:
 
Mobile Support Setup

Above you'll find older Cullman (my first) ball head with an Arca-style plate attached to the bottom. Affixed to that is an Arca-style clamp which has been bolted to an Impact Super Clamp with T-Handle.
 
This setup can be broken down into two pieces (at the clamp) for compact backpack storage and, when assembled, affixed to just about any fence which borders the Savannah River along River Street.
 
Not knowing exactly which focal length might provide the optimal framing for the event, I packed a Lowepro Flipside 400AW with my mobile support setup and the following gear:
 
Independence Day
 
Amanda and I planned to meet up with a few friends downtown before the scheduled fireworks. Unfortunately, we ended up getting to River Street later than I had intended (8:45pm). As we descended onto River Street, I realized the crowd was much larger than I had anticipated. Almost every square inch of the fence bordering the river was accounted for. It took me about 20 minutes to find a gap along the fence where I could position my camera, after which I attached my support rig, 5D III, TS-E 24mm f/3.5L and TC-80N3 remote timer. With only 10 minutes left before the show, I hurriedly composed the scene and took a few pictures at 10x Live View to obtain proper focus on the hotel building (in this case, anything beyond 14 feet would be in focus because of the hyperfocal distance). My camera settings were f/4.5, 5 seconds and ISO 200.
 
Unfortunately, my tardiness in getting to the location combined with the hot/humid Savannah night meant that condensation was inevitable. While I did wipe off the end of the lens before shooting my test images used for focusing, condensation immediately reappeared and caused halos around all the bright lights in the image. I decided to wait for the condensation to clear up in hopes that it did so before the fireworks show began.
 
At almost precisely 9:30pm, the fireworks started. However, instead of being launched from directly behind the hotel as I had been led to believe, they were actually set off several hundred yards to the east. I quickly rotated the ball head, re-leveled the camera and began shooting the fireworks (using the remote). Unfortunately, this framing led to a very uninteresting backdrop for the colorful display.
 
With my original plan out the window, I decided to try something I had used on a previous fireworks image – compositing. I changed my camera settings to isolate the explosions from the surrounding background: f/5-6.3, 8 seconds, ISO 100. These settings allowed me to capture 1-4 bursts in each frame, depending on how fast they were launched. In post processing, I would overlay my favorite fireworks images with the original framing I had imagined.
 
At the end of the night, I was left with about 150 images of fireworks that looked like this:
 
Savannah Fireworks Single Frame

Post-Processing
 
Unfortunately, I only captured a few test shots of the hotel scene before the fireworks started. As such, even my best image showed very noticeable halos around the lights.
 
I selected my favorite fireworks images in post processing and composited them with my hotel image using a "Lighten" blending mode in Photoshop CC. Note that this blending mode also allowed the fireworks' reflections in the water to be seen which was key to making the image look somewhat realistic. I also added a slight Gaussian Blur to the fireworks to simulate the type of halos/lack of sharpness visible in the base image.
 
Final Thoughts
 
Things don't always go as planned. As photographers, we sometimes have to roll with the punches and do the best with the cards we're dealt. In this case, the fireworks launching location meant that I couldn't capture the scene I had in mind in-camera. And the lateness of my arrival, combined with the hot/humid weather meant that my base image in the composite didn't turn out as well as I would have liked. However, my mobile support rig worked very well and I'm not completely dissatisfied with the final image. The halos seem in the base image actually add a dreamlike quality to it; maybe it's a fitting look as the image never actually happened in real life, but only in my dreams.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 7/8/2016 9:52:55 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, July 7, 2016
Mixing brilliant turquoise-colored water with a dramatic sunset is not so easy. The ideal light to bring out the water color is from a high overhead sun and that is of course not available at sunset. However, the water in some locations is amazingly colored enough to still show turquoise even at sunset. Three Mary Cays in North Caicos is one such location.
 
Most of the west side of North and Middle Caicos islands is inaccessible without a boat, leaving few good locations for mid-winter sunset photography (with the sun setting farther north mid-summer, more northern locations can work well at this time of the year). Of those remaining locations, the shoreline by Three Mary Cays presents very nice winter sunset views. And, the shoreline and islands all have the character I was looking for.
 
Three Mary Cays is amazingly beautiful and also amazing is how seldom it is photographed by serious photographers. Online scouting revealed very few images and I spent two evenings watching the blazing ball drop into the Atlantic Ocean at this location with no one else as far as the eye could see.
 
While the cloud moving over the sun helped significantly with the brightness balance in this image, I still opted to use an HDR technique to balance the overall exposure.
 
It has become rare for me to photograph landscapes without the Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens in the pack. This lens delivers amazing results every time. Well, at least every time I do my part of the job correctly. It is hard to believe that my other primary piece of landscape kit, the 5Ds R, is now over 1-year-old. #lovingthiscamera.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 7/7/2016 11:33:44 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, July 1, 2016
by Sean Setters
 
Back in late 2014 I purchased a Vello FreeWave Stryker from B&H (via a Daily Deal) with the intent of exploring lightning photography. After only a few times using the device, I fell in love with the endeavor. However, while the device worked well for me in very dark conditions, the device could not be correctly set to trigger the camera if the ambient light was above a certain [very low] level.
 
That left me wondering, "Is there a more flexible lightning triggering device that's also reasonably cost effective?"
 
In this case, patience paid off. In February B&H featured the Miops Camera Trigger in another Daily Deal; I decided to pick one up. Not long afterwards I also purchased the OP/TECH USA 8" Small Rain Sleeve to protect my camera during the anticipated downpours.
 
With storm season well underway, I can say I've been very impressed with the device. It can be set to detect lightning and trigger the camera in significantly brighter conditions compared to the Vello FreeWave. And the OP/TECH USA rain sleeve has proven to the perfect tool for protecting the camera. I even used it when photographing dirt track racing with Bryan a few weeks ago.
 
Miops camera trigger and camera protection in-hand, I began planning where I wanted to capture lightning. After a little bit of exploration, I settled on a view of River Street as seen from the Savannah International Trade and Convention Center just across the Savannah River. The location was optimal because it gave me a great view of downtown Savannah with City Hall (the gold domed building) being recognizable in the center of the frame. The convention center's awning also provided a decent amount of rain protection, though gusts of wind would still compromise gear if left uncovered/unprotected.
 
With the location decided upon, I needed to organize the right gear to tackle the job. And just in case I forgot to check the weather for a given day, I also installed Dark Sky - Hyperlocal Weather on my Android phone in order to receive alerts whenever precipitation was imminent. I also created a bookmark for LightningMaps.org which showed lightning activity around Savannah. After receiving a notice of precipitation, I would quickly check the map to see if lightning was also headed my way.
 
I keep a Go-Bag packed and ready for immediate use whenever storms are in the forecast. This allows me to bolt (pun intended) out the door at a moment's notice.
 
While the lenses have changed slightly in my Go-Bag over the last couple of months, most of the items remained constant. For the image above, my Go-Bag contained:
 
Every time I received a Dark Sky precipitation warning and confirmed lightning was headed toward Savannah, I would grab my gear, head downtown, drive across the Talmadge Memorial Bridge and make my way to the convention center. It took me four attempts, but this past Tuesday I was finally able to capture the lightning I had envisioned.
 
As I crossed the Talmadge Bridge Tuesday evening, I could see a significant amount of storm activity to the west. The storm was getting very close. As I was setting up my equipment, a light sprinkle of rain began to wet the ground. Soon after, it looked like a strobe light was illuminating the sky. Most of the lightning was occurring above the clouds, but every now and then one would connect with the ground within my camera's field of view.
 
I chose to use the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM because its hood would be more protective against the rain compared to the EF 17-40mm f/4L IS USM's hood. I used 10x Live View and manual focus with the camera set to f/5.6, 8 seconds at ISO 100. The f/5.6 aperture was chosen because it allowed me enough depth of field at 24mm to have most everything in focus while also keeping individual lightning bolts from overexposing the sky. An 8-second shutter speed allowed for the city lights to be decently exposed. While these settings worked well under individual strikes, multiple strikes within the 8-second shutter speed would cause overexposure in the sky especially if the bolts were large and nearby.
 
I varied the Miops Trigger's sensitivity throughout the evening so that I could limit the camera's captures to instances when they were more likely to capture a compelling lightning strike. With the sensitivity set too high, the camera would trigger at the reflection of lightning bouncing off of the clouds with no actual bolt within view. Finding the preferred setting proved very easy, though.
 
The final image above is a composite of several images taken that night. In post processing, I layered all the individual images that featured interesting lightning bolts and set them to a "Lighten" blending layer to allow the brighter parts of those images to come through. A few parts of the scene required masking so as not to have duplicate ghost items in the image (especially true around the flag poles where wind blew the flags occasionally).
 
I wish more lightning had occurred on the right side of the frame so that the image would appear more balanced, but... I didn't like any of my shots with lightning on the right side.
 
In short, I captured an image that was very close to what I had in my head and the Miops Trigger helped me do it. For what it's worth, there's currently a $40.00 instant savings on Miops Camera Trigger + cable kits and the device allows for many other types of triggering, including sound and laser triggering (which certainly increases its value). Personally, I wouldn't bother getting the mobile-branded kit as you can just as easily control the Miops trigger (connected to the camera) via your mobile phone rather than control your phone (connected to the camera, requiring an additional cable) via the Miops trigger. The only time the mobile kit would be beneficial is if you need the Miops device to be positioned well away from the camera for triggering purposes.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 7/1/2016 7:10:16 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, June 30, 2016
If you are a USA resident, I am sure you are keenly aware of the explosive holiday that is approaching. Of course, I'm talking about Independence Day (July 4th) and with it brings an excellent opportunity for festive image making.
 
As you enjoy the colorful explosions this year, be sure to bring along your camera to capture the action. Here are a few basic tips:
 
  1. Arrive early and find out exactly where the fireworks will be setting off from at your chosen location. Use this information to plan your optimal shooting location, keeping in mind various elements that might be used as a background.
  2. Choose a wider focal length to capture background elements in your fireworks photos; choose telephoto focal length to isolate the explosions. A general purpose zoom works well and allows you to capture a wide range of framings without the need to change lenses.
  3. Use a sturdy tripod to allow you to capture the fireworks from their lift off point to explosion. The trails leading back from the explosions will help viewers' eyes wonder around the image.
  4. Bring a shutter release cable for a more relaxed style of shooting. It's easy to enjoy the fireworks from a folding chair and still get compelling images with a cable release trigger in your hand.
Want to get creative? Check out these posts on capturing fireworks:
 
And if you plan on shooting off fireworks off this year (or plan on being in close proximity to them), please BE SAFE and enjoy the celebration!
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/30/2016 6:30:11 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, June 29, 2016
Looking for great access to photograph a car race? Your local dirt track may hold that key for you. Sprint car racing and other dirt track events provide great photography experiences with typically easy access and lots of freedom. Check out the Dirt Track Racing Photography Tips page to learn much more about this topic.
 
The 1D X Mark II and EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II make a great combo for this event.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image. If you find these tips useful, please share them in your circle of friends!
 
Camera and Lens Settings
70mm  f/4.5  1/250s
ISO 2000
4716 x 3144px
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/29/2016 8:16:30 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, June 26, 2016
The Canon EOS-1D X Mark II is an amazing camera, but I continue to use the Canon EOS 5Ds R a considerable percentage of the time. The primary benefit of the 5Ds R is its incredibly high resolution. Lighter weight, especially without the battery grip installed, is another advantage.
 
When planning my fawn photography trip to Big Meadows in Shenandoah National Park, I expected the higher resolution to be my preference and packed a pair of 5Ds R bodies along with many spare batteries. I also packed the 1D X Mark II, with expectations for this camera being more for additional in-the-field experience in support of the currently published review.
 
The Big Meadows meadow is thick with vegetation. Thick patches of thigh-high briars are found throughout and grass covers much of the balance of the meadow area. The grass is not exceptionally thick, but it sends stems and seed heads up rather high and there are few openings void of the tall grass.
 
While somewhat attractive, these seed heads create problem. The fawns are short – shorter than the grasses. While the fawn may be easily visible, a very high percentage of my fawn photos include a grass across an eye or blocking enough of the fawn's face to detract significantly from the image. With the sun at my back, the ideal lighting for wildlife photography, the grasses created shadows directly on the fawns and the shadows were just as detracting as the grasses themselves, creating double trouble. With careful timing, images could be captured when the fawn passes between the grasses. That is if the fawn was moving slowly and if the wind wasn't blowing.
 
The problem was that the fawns were seldom still or moving slowly and the grasses move in even the lightest wind, making accurate timing nearly impossible and even challenging with the fawn standing still. Compounding the problem was that grasses close to the camera were not so visible in the viewfinder, but they still contributed to a noticeable contrast reduction in the image. There are a lot of things to concentrate on when photographing a randomly moving animal (focus point selection to mention one) without having to keep track of blowing grasses and their shadows. Shooting from a higher position than ideal (ideal being level with the subject) was often helpful in getting above some of the grasses, but ... the 1D X Mark II's fast frame rate delivered a much greater number of keeper images than the 5Ds R was capturing.
 
Capturing images at 14 fps, there was often the right combination of body and grass positions in at least one of the frames from a burst. Or, subsequent frames captured so quickly could potentially allow portions of one image to be composited with the other, such as for removing an offending blade of grass.
 
I'm not sure if this fawn was playing or experimenting with a new food, but it was adorable for sure. I held the shutter release down for the short period of time it was holding the branch in its mouth. While I captured well over a dozen images, only one image gave me a clear view of the fawn's head.
 
Grass was my #1 nemesis in Big Meadows and was responsible for the delete button being pressed on thousands of images, but the 1D X II ensured that there were plenty of great shots remaining in the keeper folder.
 
Overall, the success of my three days in Shenandoah National Park was largely due to the 1D X II's capabilities. Even when the grass interfered visually, I was impressed at how adept the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II was at focusing on the fawn. Foreground obstructions are notorious for grabbing AF's attention, but very frequently the 1D X II figured out that the fawn was the real subject and remained locked onto it.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image. If you find these tips useful, please share them in your circle of friends!
 
Camera and Lens Settings
400mm  f/4.0  1/500s
ISO 2500
4705 x 3137px
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/26/2016 8:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, June 24, 2016
The Ben Franklin Bridge in Philadelphia, PA has been on my to-photograph list for a long time and earlier this year, I was technically able to check this attraction off of my list (I decided to keep it on the list for images from a different angle).
 
Having not been to this location before (aside from driving across the bridge), I needed some daylight time to scout for the evening's photos. I knew the basics of the area based on my research, but onsite finalization of the plan is usually needed. Even though very far from the bay and roughly 90mi (150km) from the Atlantic Ocean, this location on the Delaware River is tidal. I knew that there was a tide and that the tide would be going out during my shooting time (incoming tides require more concern). What I didn't know was the significance of the water level change. My scouting determined that locations close to the early evening water appeared best and I had lots of flowing water in the foreground for the image I envisioned.
 
As prime time approached, I watched the water level rapidly decrease a significant amount until my side of the river became nearly empty. There was nothing I could do about the situation and I was not about to attempt walking out into the quicksand-like muck. As photographers must always be ready to do, I embraced what I had to work with. The good news is that, as the water level dropped far enough, I had wet mud and pools of water that nicely reflected the bridge and city, creating a look that I may like even better than the image I had visualized.
 
On a good day, Philadelphia is an over-3-hour drive for me. The ideal time of the day to photograph the city lights with at least a little color in the sky is only a small fraction of that time duration. Life is busy and when it comes to good images, more is rarely worse than less. If you are a professional photographer, you count on your images for your income. If your primary income is not generated by photography, you probably cannot spend as must time in the field as you wish. To maximize your image volume relative to effort expended, perhaps close to a doubling effect, run two complete camera setups.
 
If you read my Canon EOS 80D review, you saw an image showing one angle of the Ben Franklin bridge. With a very short period of time to capture images and each image taking approximately a minute to capture (a 15-30-second exposure followed immediately by a same-length long exposure noise reduction process), having at least a second complete camera and tripod setup nearly doubled my images for this evening. While the 80D and Canon EF-S 18-135mm IS USM came out of the MindShift Gear BackLight 26L later in the evening, I mostly used the 5Ds R and EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II on a Gitzo GT3542LS with an Arca-Swiss Z1, set up close to the bridge.
 
About 100' (33m) to the north, I had another 5Ds R mounted to an EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens on an Gitzo GT1542T Traveler with an Acratech GP-s Ball Head as my second primary camera and lens combination.
 
I very frequently utilize a pair of cameras when shooting landscapes and cityscapes before sunrise, after sunset or even when working with strong neutral density filters under bright sunlight. The process is simple. I find a unique composition for each camera. Upon finishing one camera's setup and triggering the shutter release, I run to the other camera (well, I sort-of ran and stumbled over the big rocks in this case) and did the same. By the time I return to the first camera, it is usually finished or nearly finished with its processing. I quickly evaluate the image captured, make any adjustments I feel are warranted and repeat the process.
 
If running two camera setups not immediately within reach, safety for the gear must be considered. I wouldn't call the area below the Camden, NJ side of the Ben Franklin Bridge the safest I've been in. It was dark, there were no other people around and I kept a very close eye on the second camera setup, watching for anyone sketchy approaching. Having the cameras setup this far apart gave me very different perspectives of the bridge and city vs. simply different framing of the same perspective. The 5Ds R would permit strong cropping to achieve a similar framing adjustment, so I wanted something completely different from the second camera.
 
With so many images that I like captured that evening, I struggled to pick out one to share (part of the problem of having perfectionist tendencies). Three months later, I forced myself to pick one. This was it. Hope you like it and hope even more that you can increase the number of great images that you capture.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/24/2016 10:11:18 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, June 22, 2016
One of the keys to getting good wildlife photos around the house is of course having wildlife around the house. With even small yards able to attract wildlife (especially birds), the next key is having a camera with a good wildlife lens mounted and ready for immediate use when the wildlife shows up.
 
The incredible combination of the 1D X Mark II and EF 200-400mm f/4L IS lens has been taking on this duty for me recently. I have had a very high number of black bear sightings this spring (most frequently after the sun sets), and the range of focal lengths this lens has, including up to 560mm with the built-in extender, along with the f/4 aperture has been valuable.
 
On this rainy Wednesday, it was an ovenbird that made my day. This bird is typically found deep in the forest. While they tend to be low to the ground, the light levels there are dismal. On this day, heavy cloud cover provided reasonably bright and very soft lighting at the edge of the forest where this bird happened to be. The wet conditions provided a saturation boost and some tiny water droplets on the bird. The situation was ideal.
 
I quickly grabbed the camera and lens combo, threw the switch to place the extender in the optical path and went into action. I worked into a position that gave me an attractive background with a clear view of the bird, initially a profile. While I captured some ideal profile images, the bird began hopping into different positions and in this one, the tail wind ruffled its feathers. I'm still undecided between which of the two poses I like best, but decided to share this one as it appears more lively.
 
What is in the ovenbird's mouth? Good question. One item is an insect leg, perhaps from a grasshopper. The other is unknown, but perhaps a piece of moss or similar.
 
On this day, having a camera and lens ready to use for wildlife gave me a nice set of photos out of a very brief encounter with circumstances aligning nicely. The entire session only took a few minutes out of my day. Be ready and when opportunities arise, make the effort to go after them.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
560mm  f/7.1  1/200s
ISO 2500
5472 x 3648px
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/22/2016 10:23:03 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, June 21, 2016
I love close, frame-filling wildlife photos, but I also love wildlife photos that show animals in their environment. Getting close enough to fill the frame with an animal is often quite challenging, but I often find environmental images even more challenging to obtain. Another thing I love is a challenge and the environmental wildlife portrait challenge one was one I took on during a recent photo trip to the Big Meadows area of Shenandoah National Park.
 
Be in the Right Location
 
Location selection is a big part of environmental wildlife portraits. Basically, you need to photograph wildlife in an environment that invites the type of photos you desire. I would not describe the scenery of all locations that hold wildlife as especially photo-worthy and the tighter-framed option works better in these less-desirable landscapes.
 
Just as important as a photogenic landscape is that wildlife, or more specifically, wildlife that interests you, is in the location. Location selection resources have never been more readily available. Simply search your favorite image sharing site for the subject that has your interest. Then determine where that image was captured.
 
Timing for Photography
 
With the location selection made, timing the photography in that location can be done. If you want fall-colored leaves, there will be a week or two out of the year that needs to be targeted. If baby animals are on your list, there will be an ideal time, likely in late spring.
 
For the example I share here, I knew that early June was a good time to photograph fawns and I knew that Big Meadows in the heart of Shenandoah National Park was a great place to find them. SNP scenery is very nice, though as with most locations, it can be challenging.
 
See the Image Coming
 
Within the chosen location, wildlife cannot be controlled (unless baiting, calling, etc.), so a photographer must work with the animals wherever they decide to be. Learning wildlife behavior goes a long way to set up the ideal shot, but wildlife is generally unpredictable. While locating wildlife, visualizing ideal shots will keep your mind focused on upcoming opportunities, including those that may present themselves at a later time.
 
The key for this white-tailed deer fawn image, in addition to being in a good location at the right time of the year, was thinking ahead. The deer were moving in a general direction and I knew that the white tree trunks in front of ferns and fronted with tall grasses were coming up on their route. The shorter green grass foreground would be ideal and I surmised that these fawns and their mother may pass through this location.
 
Be Ready with the Right Gear
 
I was partly right. The mother went slightly off-angle, but the fawns cooperated briefly by walking, broadside, in line and both within the plane of sharp focus, right into the scene I visualized. I was ready.
 
Under 10 seconds. That is how much time the fawns spent in my scene. That is both extremely short and very long. I had very few other decent opportunities that lasted longer, but 9 seconds is not much time to capture an image of wildlife in motion even when standing (head and ear angles were constantly changing). This was one of the last frames captured before they turned different directions and leaped off to explore somewhere new.
 
The 1D X Mark II was in manual exposure mode with Auto ISO selected. The light levels were changing rapidly due to clouds and both deer and grass are kind to autoexposure, making Auto ISO a great choice. The adorable fawns were running/leaping/frolicking constantly, so I was using a 1/1600 shutter speed most of time. It is usually better to have more noise due to a high ISO setting than to have a motion-blurred subject. With the fawns slowing down and with their distance being greater than usual (their movement was crossing individual sensor pixels at a slower rate), I quickly rolled the shutter speed down to 1/800. Auto ISO took care of the exposure adjustment, immediately selecting a lower noise level ISO 1000. High speed burst mode with Case 1 AI Servo AF and a single AF point placed on the lead fawn worked ideally.
 
The Canon EOS-1D X Mark II and Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens combo performed impressively on the entire trip. While this lens has many benefits (including incredible sharpness), being able to zoom to ideally compose a scene, especially one with multiple animals, is a big one. Though this image does not take in a wide, grand landscape, it includes enough surroundings to qualify for at least my own definition of environmental. At 362mm, this lens could be set to an even much wider angle. However, I didn't feel that additional surroundings were going to be positive additions to the image. I had enough angle of view at the chosen focal length.
 
I'll talk more about the 1D X II's amazing frame rate and why it was so important for this location in another post, but ... I made full use of the 14 fps. Just to clarify, there really are two different fawns in this picture. This particular frame taken from a burst captured both in nearly identical positions. Upon a quick glance, my daughter suggested that I may have clone stamped the second deer into the image. I assure you that was not the case – there really were two fawns there. The slightly different leg positions are the biggest clue.
 
The 1D X II's AF system performed especially well in the tall grasses the fawns were commonly found in and was ready when the fawns started leaping and playing.
 
Note that I used a monopod exclusively for support on this trip. While a tripod provides better support, a monopod is faster to use. With only one leg to retract or extend and with no leg angles to set, I could quickly move into positions and set up, a key to getting many of the images I captured on this trip. A monopod also means less weight to carry around. The wildlife I was shooting required shutter speeds fast enough to avoid motion blur, especially with the support of the monopod.
 
Seize the Opportunity
 
Be ready to take advantage of all wildlife photo ops made available to you. Even if focused on the environmental images, take the tighter-framed images when availed to you. Wildlife photography is extremely challenging and no opportunity should be passed on. Having a mix of subject framing will make a portfolio or gallery appear more complete.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image. If you find these tips useful, please share them in your circle of friends!
 
Camera and Lens Settings
362mm  f/5.6  1/800s
ISO 1000
5472 x 3648px
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/21/2016 9:08:53 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, June 7, 2016
by Sean Setters
 
I've always wanted to photograph butterflies, but my lack of patience and my general inability to find them meant that butterflies were never a subject featured in my portfolio.
 
However, while traveling through New England last week, I stopped by the Magic Wings Butterfly Conservatory and Gardens in South Deerfield, MA. I quickly realized that visiting a butterfly conservatory was the perfect way to quickly gain experience with butterfly photography and bolster my portfolio with images of the beautifully-winged creatures.
 
The Magic Wings Conservatory is an 8,000 square foot facility housing roughly 4,000 butterflies featuring several dozen individual species (the exact number of species depends on the season). The admission fee for visiting the conservatory is $14.00 and is good for an entire day of re-entry (the admission fee for children is less). Note that this particular facility does not allow tripods or monopods to be used in its conservatory.
 
It's actually quite difficult to aptly describe the experience of walking into a beautiful garden inhabited by thousands of butterflies of all shapes and sizes, as words like "amazing" and "dream-like" don't seem to really do it justice. But if you have the chance to experience it, as a photographer or simply a curious visitor, don't miss out on the opportunity.
 
Magic Wings Butterfly Conservatory Image 2

From a photography perspective, a butterfly conservatory gives you ample opportunities to create beautiful and inspiring butterfly images. The experience and images gained from photographing butterflies in a conservatory would likely require years to garner in the wild, allowing you to easily bolstering your portfolio in a single afternoon.
 
You might think that photographing butterflies in captivity is much like photographing wildlife in zoos (which can be difficult if trying to eliminate man-made elements in your frame), but because butterflies are so small and backgrounds (and any man-made elements within those backgrounds) can easily be thrown well out of focus, images captured in a conservatory will likely be indistinguishable from those captured in the wild.
 
Magic Wings Butterfly Conservatory Image 3

For my trip to the Magic Wings Conservatory, I used a Canon EOS 7D Mark II with an EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro. In this case, I chose the 7D Mark II over the 5D Mark III because I had forgotten to pack my BlackRapid Strap (which can be conveniently switched between bodies) and the neck strap that Bryan had loaned me was already attached to the 7D II. The EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM would have been a better lens for this particular endeavor, but... I originally invested in the non-L version of the macro because I rarely shoot macros handheld (and IS would have certainly come in handy here). Another item I wish I had packed for my trip was the RoundFlash Magnetic Ringflash Adapter, but when packing I did not envision needing the rather highly-specialized light modifier for the trip. Other lighting options well-suited for this type of photography include the Canon Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX and MR-14EX II Macro Ring Lite.
 
The conservatory I visited featured nicely diffused light thanks to the water vapor adorned the inside of the large windows. But "nicely diffused" doesn't necessarily mean "plentiful," even when bright sunlight is hitting the building. One particular issue with lighting is that butterflies often like to attach themselves to the underside of leaves or to the top of leaves with additional leaves shading them. The great thing about a conservatory is that your chances of catching a butterfly in great light is extremely high, so a small amount of patience goes a long way.
 
For the photos accompanying this afticle, I was using an f/3.2 or f/3.5 aperture in Av mode with an ISO of 1000 or 1250 to obtain shutter speeds that were fast enough to counteract camera shake and freeze movement. Images were post-processed in Lightroom CC.
 
Magic Wings Butterfly Conservatory Image 4

Word of warning: If you open your camera bag to change lenses or retrieve gear, be sure that there are no stowaways when you exit the facility. I checked myself thoroughly before leaving the facility to make sure that there were no butterflies attached to my clothing. However, as I proceeded to detach the lens from my camera and put both items in my camera bag, a butterfly flew out of my Lowepro NovaSport 35L AW. I had to [sheepishly] alert the staff to the butterfly escapee.
 
Magic Wings Butterfly Conservatory Image 5

Are you excited to gain lots of experience in butterfly photography? There are plenty of butterfly conservatories in North America. Here are just a few I found:
 
Niagara Parks Butterfly Conservatory
2565 Niagara Pkwy, Niagara Falls, ON L0S 1J0, Canada
 
Key West Butterfly and Nature Conservatory
1316 Duval Street, Key West, FL 33040
 
The American Museum of Natural History Butterfly Exhibit
(Open September 5, 2015 - May 30, 2016)
Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192
 
Magic Wings Butterfly Conservatory
281 Greenfield Rd, South Deerfield, MA 01373
 
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Pavilion of Wings Exhibit
900 Exposition Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90007
 
There are many others, of course. You can find a more extensive list organized by state here. Be sure to research in advance to ensure the exhibit will be open during your planned visit.
 
Do you have a favorite butterfly conservatory? If so, share your location experience in the comments!
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 6/7/2016 8:10:39 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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