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 Monday, January 7, 2019
From Canon USA:
 
ENG-Style Camcorder is The First G-Series Camcorder with 4K 30P Recording and 20x Optical Zoom Lens
 
MELVILLE, NY, January 7, 2019 – A versatile addition to the VIXIA G-series family of camcorders, Canon U.S.A. Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the Canon VIXIA HF G50. The camcorder is the first VIXIA G-series camcorder to feature 4K 30P recording and is an ideal tool for advanced amateur filmmakers, wedding videographers and student reporters. Featuring a genuine wide-angle Canon 20x (29.3-601mm)* optical zoom lens, the VIXIA HF G50 provides a well-rounded feature set at an affordable price point.
 
“As filmmaking and videography continue to grow into a more ubiquitous medium of visual expression, it is imperative that creatives have products that help capture their unique vision,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and COO, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “Not only is Canon eager to view what our users create with the VIXIA HF G50, we are excited to be with them along the way as their skills and ideas further evolve into the future.”
 
The VIXIA HF G50 camcorder records 4K UHD/30p (4:2:0 8 bit) and 1080p Full HD (4:2:2 10 bit via SDI/HDMI Output) in MP4 format to dual-card SD card slots with dual and relay recording. Users can also record in slow and fast motion interval from 0.4x to 1200x providing users with additional creative possibilities. To help provide enhanced image quality over its predecessor, over sample HD processing can be utilized with information obtained from the 4K 1/2.3-inch sensor and the DIGIC DV 6 image processor.
 
The VIXIA HF G50 camcorder’s Intelligent Optical Image Stabilization five-axis system Dual-Pixel CMOS AF provides users with powerful image stabilization via a Dynamic mode, which reduces image distortion even when shooting while walking. By adopting the 8-bladed circular aperture applying the EF lens technology, it is possible to take pictures using natural beautiful bokeh. The ergonomically designed and highly portable camcorder has a 3-inch LCD touch panel screen and tilting, user-friendly, high-resolution color Electronic View Finder (EVF).
 
Pricing and Availability
 
The Canon VIXIA HF G50 4K UHD video camcorder is scheduled to be available in April 2019 for an estimated retail price of $1099.00.
 
B&H has the Canon Vixia HF G50 UHD 4K Camcorder available for preorder.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/7/2019 10:12:25 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Stories are great. Sometimes a picture tells a story and sometimes a story comes from getting the picture. One afternoon during a fall photo trip to Colorado, we headed to Owl Creek Pass. This area is very scenic, especially with fall colors.
 
The dirt road over the top of this pass can be questionable after a rain (at least without an off-road-capable vehicle) and we had plenty of rain but opted to give it a go with the small Ford Edge AWD SUV we had rented. At a relatively high elevation, we discovered that the road was being worked on and by the time we reached the top, we were bottoming out on loose gravel being dumped (tailgated) onto the road. By maintaining forward momentum, we made it over this rather long obstacle but were then greeted by a thick mud road surface until finally reaching the top of the pass.
 
As we went over the top, the serious question was whether or not we should risk going down the other side. That answer was quickly provided in the form of a 6-wheel-drive grader coming up the other side. It was mostly sideways and consuming the entire width of the relatively narrow road. The large machine had its rear scarifier down and was tearing up the road surface, preparing it for a fresh layer of stone similar to what we had just driven through. The decision to turn back was easy and immediate with a strong sense of that get-out-while-you-can feeling.
 
While on our way back down the mountain (it is easier to plow stone when going down hill), beyond the active road construction area, the sun broke through the clouds and we stopped to take pictures at the next clearing. Very few people were around this rather remote area, but a couple was at this spot taking a selfie. My daughter asked them if they would like us to take their picture, volunteering me to do so. They were quite happy about that and I quickly obliged while very anxious to get my shot before the small hole the clouds passed and the sunlight again was again shut off.
 
Looking at my hat, purchased in Hawaii over 5 years prior, the young guy asked if I had been to Hawaii. Turns out that he was a crew member for the boat company I had sailed with during the Canon Hawaii product announcement event only a few weeks prior. He showed me pictures on his phone of the boat I had been on. What are the odds that?
 
We chatted for a while and I of course captured a large number of images of this spectacular scene while doing so.
 
Direct sunlight shining under heavy clouds is at the top of my favorite lighting scenarios list. When the light is this good, the image results can be striking without much processing. The standard picture style was used to process this image and no additional contrast adjustments were made. The biggest processing challenge was to determine which image to share with you.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
50mm  f/9.0  1/180s
ISO 100
6516 x 4344px
Post Date: 1/7/2019 7:43:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
London, UK, Wednesday 2nd January 2019 — Canon Europe, a world leader in digital imaging solutions, announces the release of its new camera API package, offering a range of resources to developers. The combined EOS Digital software development kit (SDK) and all-new Camera Control API (CCAPI) create unique opportunities for developers and software engineers to take advantage of select Canon cameras and lenses, launching with the PowerShot SX70 HS.
 
Many developers have already benefited from Canon SDKs, enabling them to integrate Canon cameras and lenses in their solutions and control them remotely, wired via USB. Such applications include photo booths, robotic / automated units, event photography and recording, mass portrait / passport and photogrammetry systems.
 
The EDSDK benefits will allow users to control Canon cameras remotely from a Mac or PC and use the same code across all compatible Canon cameras. To take advantage of multi-platform support on select models1 for fast development, the new CCAPI features an agnostic operating system, allowing wireless usage in any environment, such as Windows, Mac, Android, iOS or Linux.
 
Key EDSDK/CCAPI functions include:
 
  • Detecting, connecting/disconnecting the camera
  • Checking and changing camera settings, including time
  • Remote shooting
  • Downloading/erasing images, formatting cards
“We are delighted to be expanding our EOS Digital SDK to the PowerShot series2 and provide a tool that enables control of the camera and its power zoom remotely”, said Yuko Tanaka, ITCG Product Marketing Director. “In addition, the new Camera Control API is based on Internet Protocol, making it compatible with all operating systems”.
 
The PowerShot SX70 HS is Canon latest premium bridge camera, that delivers a truly portable and versatile shooting experience. The camera features a powerful 65x optical fixed lens zoom, equivalent to a 21–1365mm focal length. It also has DSLR-style looks and handling, a 7.5cm Vari-Angle LCD screen, 20.3 Megapixel sensor and 4K Ultra High Definition video. The PowerShot SX70 HS is an ideal all-in-one camera, capable of handling all types of shooting scenario, without the need to carry multiple lenses.
 
Camera API Package Availability
 
The camera API package is a release driven by business users’ feedback and is part of Canon’s commitment to deliver convenient solutions to developers and integrators. The EOS Digital SDK is available for immediate download at www.didp.canon-europa.com.
 
The Camera Control API will be available from March 2019 via the Canon developer’s website.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/7/2019 8:08:38 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From Canon USA:
 
Join Canon Explorer of Light Joel Grimes as he takes you through his portraits session with the Canon EOS R and Canon tilt-shift lenses. Go behind the scenes throughout the entire workflow; from capture, to edit, to print.
 
Learn more about the gear used here:
 
Post Date: 1/7/2019 7:39:47 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Laowa:
 
Featuring a 113° field of view, close-to-zero distortion & affordable pricing, Laowa 9mm f/2.8 DL Zero-D is a dream lens for DJI Inspire 2 pilots.
 
Anhui China, 3 Jan 2019 – Venus Optics, the camera lenses manufacturer who had previously launched a number of unique Laowa camera lenses, is proud to introduce the widest lens currently available for the DJI X7 cameras on Inspire 2 drones, Laowa 9mm f/2.8 Zero-D DL.
 
The new DL mount has the same specifications and optical performance as the existing Fuji X, Sony E and Canon EF-M mounts launched in 2018. All of them feature an ultra-wide 113° angle, cover Super35-sized sensor and have a close-to-zero distortion. The Laowa 9mm is significantly wider than the currently widest DL lens (i.e. 80°) in the market, allowing aerial cinematographers to capture more in limited distances. The ultra-fast f/2.8 lens also provide more flexibility to do night time aerial videography.
 
The lens is carefully designed to reduce the optical distortion to a close-to-zero level. It allows straight lines to be perfectly retained and saves videographers tremendous time in post-processing. Venus Optics is reputable in producing distortion-free lenses for multiple systems including the widest f/2 lens for full frame E-mount cameras (i.e. Laowa 15mm f/2 FE Zero-D).
 
The size and weight of the lens have also been compressed to the minimal in its class. It weighs only 210g (0.46 lbs) and 60mm (2.36 in) long. This compact and lightweight lens comprises of 15 elements in 10 groups with 2 pcs of aspherical elements and 3 pcs of Extralow dispersion elements. This optical design successfully minimizes the distortion and chromatic aberrations to its lowest but at the same time, delivers a superb optical performance. A 49mm filter thread is also included for cinematographers to use with ND filters.
 
Specifications
 
Focal Length9mm
Max. Aperturef/2.8
Angle of View113°
Format CompatibilitySuper35
Lens Structure15 elements in 10 groups
Aperture Blades7
Filter Thread49mm
Dimensions60 x 53mm
Weight210g
MountsDJI DL

Pricing & Availability
 
The retail selling price of the Laowa 9mm f/2.8 Zero-D DL mount in US is USD $499.00 (ex- VAT). Pricing may vary in different countries.
 
The lens is now available to order from Venus Optics authorized resellers and is available to ship immediately.
 
B&H carries Venus Optics Laowa 9mm f/2.8 Zero-D Lenses (DL mount will likely be available soon).
Category: Laowa News
Post Date: 1/7/2019 6:19:56 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Sunday, January 6, 2019
I love Pronghorn most because of their colors. But, they have many other great qualities. The dark, semi-heart shaped horns are one and that mohawk hair style is great.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
600mm  f/4.0  1/2000s
ISO 2000
3948 x 2632px
Post Date: 1/6/2019 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Saturday, January 5, 2019
From ProGrade Digital:
 
Get Simultaneous Transfer of Files from Cards in Both Slots at Speeds of to 10Gb/s (1.25GB/s)
 
SAN JOSE, Calif., January 04, 2019 — ProGrade Digital, founded with a mission to provide the highest quality professional grade digital memory cards and workflow solutions, introduces and announces immediate availability of its newest product, the SD Dual-Slot USB 3.1, Gen. 2 Card Reader, $79.99 USD. As with all other ProGrade Digital USB 3.1, Gen. 2 workflow readers, files on each card transfer simultaneously at speeds of up to 10Gb/s (1.25GB/s).
 
“Many of today’s professional cameras have two SD slots, so it is only natural that ProGrade Digital’s newest USB 3.1, Gen. 2 workflow reader be a dual-slot for SD cards,” said Wes Brewer, founder and CEO of ProGrade Digital. “Based on the successes of earlier workflow readers, we know that our patent-pending magnetic base, compact rugged design and inclusion of two USB cables (Types A to C and C to C) really resonates with both professionals and prosumers. The dual-slot reader for SD cards provides just one more choice for our customers.”
 
The Prograde Digital USB 3.1, Gen. 2 Dual-Slot SD Card Reader is available on Amazon.
Post Date: 1/5/2019 9:18:16 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
When going afield, I often have some image goals in mind. Being opportunistic, taking advantage of every opportunity afforded, is always the primary plan with wildlife photography, but looking for opportunities to capture the goal shots is also part of the plan.
 
When viewed straight on from the front, most animals appear symmetrical and that is a look that can often work well in an image. One of my goal shots for this trip was a head-on image of a bugling bull elk (cow elk do not bugle) with its head and antlers characteristically laid back. Put that elk in a meadow with a strongly blurred background and I'd be even happier.
 
This shot nailed the head position I was looking for and most of the other aspects were in line with the goal. The elk's body position is nearly ideal, but the bull seemed to have its neck shifted slightly, breaking perfect alignment. Few sets of antlers are perfectly symmetrical and this set has some side-to-side variation.
 
I'll be attempting to one-up this image in the fall.
 
Coming with me?
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
Post Date: 1/5/2019 7:30:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, January 4, 2019
B&H has the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L USM Lens (review) in stock with free expedited shipping.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • RF-Mount Lens/Full-Frame Format
  • Aperture Range: f/2 to f/22
  • Ultra-Low Dispersion Elements
  • Ring-Type Ultrasonic Motor AF System
  • Customizable Control Ring
  • Rounded 9-Blade Diaphragm
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/4/2019 12:47:36 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
It is time to put some to-be-anticipated events on the calendar. Consider this a personal invitation to join me for one or all of the following instructional photo tours. Photographers at all skill levels are welcome!
 
Acadia National Park
 
Fall Landscape in Acadia National Park Instructional Photography Tour
 
Tue, Oct 15 through Sun, Oct 20, 2019
 

 
Shenandoah National Park
 
"Whitetail Buck in Rut and Much More", Shenandoah National Park
 
Sun, November 10 to Wed, November 13, 2019 and/or Wed, November 13 - Sat, November 16, 2019
 

 
Shaking Brown Bear, Katmai National Park, Alaska
 
Brown Bear Chasing Salmon, Remote Katmai National Park, Alaska
 
Thu, September 17 to Fri, September 24, 2020
 
Feel free to contact me with your destination request.
Post Date: 1/4/2019 8:29:03 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
These days, digital cameras support various types of memory cards such as CompactFlash, CFAST, XQD, Sony MemoryStick and – the focus of today's article – the ultra-popular Secure Digital (SD/SDHC/SDXC).
 
If you have ever been shopping for SD memory cards, you likely noticed a lot of different numbers of symbols on the cards' labels. Although seemingly cryptic, those numbers and symbols reveal important information about a card's performance, and whether or not that memory card is right for your intended use. So let's take a closer look at a typical SD card's label to see what information is available.
 
Secure Digital Memory Card Label (SanDisk)

Format
 
In 1999, SanDisk, Panasonic and Toshiba jointly introduced the Secure Digital memory card format (later referred to as Secure Digital Standard Capacity, or SDSC) in an attempt to improve upon the existing MultiMediaCard (MMC). The following year, those same companies formed the SD Card Association to develop SD standards and promote the new memory card format. In 2006, the SD Card Association outlined the SDHC (Secure Digital High Capacity) format in the second version of its SD specifications with support for memory cards up to 32 GB and speeds up to 25 MB/s. Later, the development of Ultra High Speed bus systems would increase the speeds available for SDHC memory cards. Three years later, the SDXC (Secure Digital eXtended Capacity) format was introduced supporting capacities of 2 TB and speeds of 104 MB/s with the addition of the UHS-I (Ultra High Speed) bus standard. When UHS-II was introduced in 2011, speeds up to 312 MB/s became possible. In 2018, The SD Card Association developed the SDUC (Secure Digital Ultra Capacity) format with support for 128 TB and speeds up to 985 MB/s.
 
Card TypeSupported
Capacity
Supported
Bus Speed
File System
SDSCup to 2 GB12.5 MB/sFAT12/FAT16
SDHCup to 32 GB25 MB/sFAT32
SDXCup to 2 TB312 MB/sexFAT
SDUCup to 128 TB985 MB/sexFAT

Max Read Speed
 
The max read speed indicates how fast the data from the memory card can be read under ideal circumstances. On some cards, an x-rating value is displayed. The x-rating is based on the original data transfer speed of CD-ROMs (150 KB/s). Because there may be a significant discrepancy between read speeds and write speeds, max read speeds (and x-ratings) are not truly indicative of the kind of performance you can expect from a memory card when used in your camera (where write speeds are significantly more important). Note that some manufacturers list separate max Read/Write data specs to clarify their card's performance, and the SD Association's introduction of Speed Classes (and Video Speed Classes) also help to clarify SD memory cards' performance (more on that later).
 
x Speed RatingApprox. Max
Read Speed
300x45 MB/s
400x60 MB/s
633x95 MB/s
1000x150 MB/s
2000x300 MB/s

UHS Class Speed
 
UHS-I and UHS-II cards (more on these later) may list a UHS class rating to designate the minimum write performance for the card, with U1 indicating 10 MB/s and U3 indicating 30 MB/s or more.
 
Capacity
 
Listed big and bold, and probably what most consumers pay the most attention to, is the memory card's capacity. Of course, a larger capacity means more images/videos can be saved before running out of room.
 
Video Speed Class
 
In order to cater to the needs of videographers, the SD Association created a Video Class Speed to designate the minimum sequential writing speed of the card. The number following the "V" indicates the minimum number of MB/s the card is capable of sequentially writing. In the example above, the card is minimally capable of writing 30 MBs of data to the card every second.
 
Bus Interface
 
An SD memory card's UHS (Ultra High Speed) rating indicates the maximum amount of data that can physically move into and out of the card. Along with the SDXC standard released in the SD Association's v.3.01 specification standards (2009), the UHS-I standard was also introduced. UHS-II and UHS-III soon followed allowing for even greater bus speeds, but these technologies required a second row of pins to be added to memory cards. The latest UHS bus iteration is dubbed "UHS Express" and has a theoretical limit of 985 MB/s.
 
Bus InterfaceBus Speed
UHS-I12.5 MB/s (SDR12)
25 MB/s (SDR25)
50 MB/s (SDR50, DDR50)
104 MB/s (SDR104)
UHS-II156 MB/s (FD156)
312 MB/s (HD312)
UHS-III312 MB/s (FD312)
624 MB/s (FD624)
UHS-Express985 MB/s (FD985)

Speed Class
 
Speed Classes 2, 4 and 6 support write speeds to a fragmented card of 2, 4 and 6 MB/s respectively. Class 10 cards, on the other hand, support a minimum of 10 MB/s sequential writing to a non fragmented card in addition to utilizing a high speed bus mode. As you can see, there's a lot of room for a Class 10 memory card to exceed the minimum spec, which is probably why the other class ratings (such as UHS/Video) were implemented.
 
Speed ClassMin. Seq.
Write Speed
Suggested Use
Class 22 MB/sSD Video
Class 44 MB/sup to 1080p/30p
Class 66 MB/sup to 1080p/30p
Class 10, U1/V1010 MB/sup to 1080p/120p
Class 10, U3/V3030 MB/sup to 4K/120p
Class 10, U3/V6060 MB/sup to 8K/120p
Class 10, U3/V9090 MB/sup to 8K/120p

Which memory card should I get for my camera?
 
In short, the memory card that has a sufficient capacity, the performance necessary to meet your most data-hungry needs and falls within your budget range. Keep in mind that SD memory cards are backward compatible; even if a memory card maxes out the capabilities of your camera to record data to it, you may find the extra performance useful when a) transferring images or video to other devices via a card reader or b) when your next camera offers features such as higher resolution images and/or video.
 
Secure Digital Memory Card Suggested RetailersB&H | Adorama
Post Date: 1/4/2019 8:28:57 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H is set to host the second annual Depth of Field – Professional Portrait, Wedding and Event Photography Conference next month on February 5-6, 2019.
 
From B&H:
 
B&H Photo Video Pro-Audio is proud to present the second annual Depth of Field conference. Over the course of two days, photographers looking to elevate their craft will experience the hottest gear, hands on demonstrations, interactive experiences, portfolio reviews, inspirational and motivational speakers and more!
 
RSVP now to guarantee your free ticket and be updated with the event’s agenda, a complete list of speakers and details about special events at Depth of Field.
 
What to Expect
 
Inspirational lectures from iconic photographers and industry leaders; fully equipped studios and models with which to build your promotional body of work; one-on-one portfolio reviews; advanced lighting and workflow demonstrations… plus the Depth of Field Challenge!
 
Keynote Speaker, Albert Watson
 
As one of the world’s most successful and prolific photographers since 1970, Albert Watson has created some of the most iconic images ever seen in art, fashion and commercial photography. From portraits of Alfred Hitchcock and Steve Jobs and beauty shots of Kate Moss to Las Vegas landscapes and still-life photographs of King Tutankhamen artifacts, Watson’s diversity and body of work are unparalleled. His striking photographs and stunning hand-made prints are featured in galleries and museums around the globe.
 
Regiser for the Event
Category: B&H News
Post Date: 1/4/2019 6:09:01 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, January 3, 2019
LensRentals has posted a teardown of the Sony FE 400mm f/2.8 GM OSS Lens.
 
From the LensRentals Blog:
So what did we learn today? Really, not a lot. The Sony 400mm f/2.8 G is exactly what we expected; a very solidly built lens that is everything construction-wise you would hope for in a big beast of a super telephoto that costs $12,000. It has excellent weather sealing, heavy-duty engineering between the barrel segments, a very solid chassis, and components that all appear up to the task.
Sony FE 400mm f/2.8 GM OSS Retailers - B&H | Adorama
Post Date: 1/3/2019 12:48:11 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Just posted: Robus RC-5570 Vantage Carbon Fiber Tripod Review.
 
This is an impressive tripod with an equally impressively low price.
 
The Robus RC-5570 Vantage Carbon Fiber Tripod is in stock at B&H.
Post Date: 1/3/2019 7:42:08 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
From Irix:
 
We would like to announce and confirm that there are no issues with Irix lenses, as regards their general operation for the Canon EF mount in their current line-up when used on the Canon EOS R camera, and as released by the Canon Corporation via their Canon EOS R Adapter (Canon EF to Canon EOS R mount).
 
Thanks to this, it is possible to control the aperture from the camera, information about the distance transmitted to which the lens is focused, and to save full information about the exposure parameters in the EXIF format.
 
Compatible Irix lenses:
 
  • Irix 11mm f/4
  • Irix 15mm f/2.4
  • Irix 150mm f/2.8 1:1 Macro
B&H carries IRIX lenses.
Category: IRIX News
Post Date: 1/3/2019 6:29:39 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the Daniel Norton Photographer YouTube Channel:
 
In this video I put to the test my statement that if you only have one light, an Octagon softbox is the best and most versatile modifier for portraits.
 
Gear Used
 
Profoto B1X - B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Profoto Air Remote - B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Profoto 3’ RFI Octa - B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Profoto RFI Speedring for Profoto - B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Post Date: 1/3/2019 5:16:06 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, January 2, 2019
Just posted: Canon RF 28-70mm F2 L USM Lens Review.
 
Having the RF 28-70mm F2 L mounted is like having a kit full of prime lenses mounted at the same time.
 
Get in line now – the first delivery of these lenses didn't fill the initial demand. The Canon RF 28-70mm F2 L USM Lens is available for preorder at B&H (expected in stock on 1/7) | Amazon | Adorama | WEX.
 
Rent the Canon RF 28-70mm F2 L USM Lens from Lensrentals.
Post Date: 1/2/2019 8:05:46 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, January 1, 2019
One of my primary goals is to help you get great images and I'd love for you to join me for 3 or 6 days of wildlife and outdoor photography in this great location. I have made space in the schedule and have the necessary Shenandoah National Park permit in hand.
 
When and Where: Sun, June 9 to Wed, June 12, 2019 and/or Wed, June 12 - Sat, June 15, 2019 in Shenandoah National Park
 
This trip is offered in a choice of 3 or 6 days (other options will be considered). The plan is to meet at the lodge on Sunday and/or Wed mid-day and we will wrap up after a morning shoot on the last day.
 
Who
 
Hopefully you, along with 3 (at most) others. While large groups are far more profitable from a business perspective, photographing wildlife in the field is challenging in large groups and keeping the group small means better opportunities and more personal attention.
 
Cost
 
The cost for this IPT is $995 per 3 days with a 50% deposit locking in your spot (balance is due 90 days prior to the IPT). Email me at Bryan@Carnathan.com to sign up or ask questions!
 
Whitetail Deer Fawns in Big Meadows, Shenandoah National Park
 
What are We Photographing?
 
Our primary photo subject will be wildlife. Wildlife, by definition, is "wild" and that means it is unpredictable and there can be no guarantees. That said, Shenandoah National Park is one of the best locations in the world to photograph whitetail deer and whitetail fawns are one of the cutest creatures on the face of this planet (it seems that everyone loves pictures of them). The timing for this trip is such that most of the fawns will be recently-born and the foliage for the always-important image backgrounds, which are also excellent here, should include beautiful bright green colors. Even with the high whitetail density found in SNP, fawns remain quite challenging to photograph, but the rewards are worth the effort.
 
Deer are not the only wildlife subject found here and, especially at this time of the year, there is high likelihood that black bears will avail themselves as subjects along with a variety of birds and other smaller mammals. We will be opportunistic and take advantage of any subjects that we encounter – and those moments are part of the excitement. In addition to the immersive wildlife photography experience, there will certainly be opportunity for some landscape photography. My time in the field is limited and I need to have a high probability of good opportunities when I make such time investment. SNP rarely lets me down in that regard. Basically, we will work hard to capture some great images, attempting to build out your portfolio and light up your social feeds as well as working on improving your photography skills. And, we'll have fun along the way.
 
A Sense of Urgency for this Trip
 
CWD (Chronic Wasting Disease) has been detected within 11 miles of SNP (according to the SNP wildlife biologist I talked to in Mar 2018). This awful disease is always fatal to deer and when it reaches within 5 miles of the park, implementation of an already-established plan will significantly reduce the deer population here. That means this awesome experience is at high risk and that is one of the reasons I make this location a priority.
 
Shenandoah National Park Black Bear
 
Tour/Workshop/Adventure/Expedition
 
While the implied definitions of these terms vary, I see "workshops" typically laid out with a planned schedule and "tours" typically designed to put you in front of subjects at the right time. I'm calling this trip a "tour" because the primary goal is for you to get great images and we will be opportunistic in that regard, making a firm schedule difficult to implement. That said, we will spend a lot of time together and I will teach (including as we are actively photographing), answer questions (please bring many), critique images, assist in editing, etc. throughout our time together. Thus, the educational element will also be a primary part of our time together – an "Instructional Photo Tour".
 
In the field, we will photograph side-by-side. You taking great images home will be a primary goal, but you capturing those images yourself is important and I can best describe what you should do if I am doing it myself at the same time. This also provides the participant opportunity to watch how it is done. Your constant feedback and questions during the IPT are important and will enable me to provide you with the best experience possible.
 
An "expedition" is another type of immersive photography experience and this event involves multiple daily mini-expeditions. Certain is that we will have an adventure.
 
Physical Requirements
 
This will be a moderately strenuous trip, with much of the strain dependent on the size and weight of the gear you are carrying. There will likely be some easy wildlife photography opportunities encountered, but we will be carrying our gear through the woods, tall grass and light brush over hilly terrain, often attempting to keep ahead of moving wildlife. Thus, one needs to be in reasonable physical condition.
 
What is Included
 
Transportation during the experience along with everything described in the Tour/Workshop/Adventure/Expedition section above is included. By not including the items listed below in the fee, individuals are able choose their level of spending.
 
What is Not Included
 
If staying for the entire duration of the trip and as long as our schedules align, I can provide transportation to and from the Dulles International Airport region or from anywhere directly on my route from the north — primarily RT 81. Otherwise, transportation to/from Skyland Resort is not included. Also, the National Park-required entrance fee is additionally required.
 
Lodging. We will be staying at the Big Meadows Lodge. I usually get a very basic lodge room, but other options are available, ranging from camping to cabins. I am happy to connect you with other participants if a shared room are desired.
 
Food. Because of the remoteness of this location, our food will primarily consist of what is offered at the Wayside Diner or the park lodge along with any food brought along into the park or purchased at the camp store. Because it gets light very early at this time of the year (getting enough sleep will be one of our challenges), we will begin photographing before services are open. I usually pack breakfast to eat in my room prior to the morning shoots. I take a cooler with jugs of ice and ice is available at the lodge (you need bag/bucket to transport it from the ice machine). Typically, we will eat second breakfast/early lunch (or perhaps both) at the Wayside Diner (usually open 8-8 at this time of the year) or optionally the lodge and we will likely eat at the lodge for early or late dinner (it closes at 9:00). I suggest packing granola bars and/or bringing other snacks along while photographing (especially in case we find an amazing subject that we don't want to leave). Plan to have water or other drink available to take with you.
 
Schedule
 
At this time of the year, the days are long and the nights are correspondingly short. Our best opportunities will be found early and late in the day and we will target these times. Fatigue can dampen mental and physical sharpness, so we will usually return to our rooms mid-day for some downtime and a nap. We will go back out mid-late afternoon and stay out until the light level drops too low for good images. These plans are all very flexible and we can target any specific interests the group has.
 
Cancellation Policy
 
Travel insurance is strongly recommended. If a cancellation notice is received between 90 and 179 days before the workshop start date, a 50% refund of any payments made will be provided. If a cancellation notice is provided within less than 90 days of the workshop, no refund of payments made will be provided ... regardless of the cancellation notice received date, any workshop openings that are re-filled will be refunded payment in full minus a $195 administrative fee.
 
Let's Do This! Sign Up Now!
 
Email me at Bryan@Carnathan.com to sign up or ask questions!
 
Camera Gear Needed
 
Aside from a great attitude and a strong interest in photographing wildlife, you are going to need some gear and mid-upper-grade gear should be considered for good results from this event.
 
For fawns, a camera with a reasonably fast frame rate (fawns are almost constantly moving) and high-performing AF system is preferred, though not required. This generally means a DSLR camera or a late-model MILC (Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera) should be in your bag.
 
A telephoto lens or lenses will be needed with a full-frame equivalent of at least 400mm (250mm on an APS-C) suggested and having longer focal lengths available is preferred. Wildlife activity is greatest early and late, so wide apertures are often an advantage and the wide aperture's ability to blur the background can be useful. Any telephoto lens can work, but there may be times when an f/4 or wider aperture is preferred. This is a great event to break out your big lenses for and it is also a great time to try a new one, perhaps via renting.
 
Ideal is a camera such as the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II with a Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens (with built-in 1.4x extender) or Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM Lens. The Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens is usually in my primary wildlife kit. I'll bring a variety of other lenses and accessories including a Black Rapid shoulder strap to carry the big lenses with.
 
I primarily use a monopod while photographing wildlife in this location. It is not as stable as a tripod and requires more effort to use, but it is much faster to set up and adjust. While neither are mandatory, one or both is preferred. I always take both to this location.
 
We can potentially make use of a full range of landscape photography gear, including ultra-wide to wide angle lenses and circular polarizer and ND filters.
 
It is highly recommended to bring a laptop, enabling review of your images during our time together. Bring an external hard drive for an additional level of backup. Bring adequate memory card capacity, enough batteries to last at least a day with enough chargers to restore that capability overnight.
 
Consider what failure of any piece of gear means for your experience. Consider bringing a backup for items identified as critical.
 
As always, feel free to ask us for gear advice.
 
Weather / Clothing
 
The weather in early June is typically very nice in Shenandoah National Park. However, the mountain can create its own weather and that can be at least somewhat unpredictable. Rain gear may be very appreciated at times, including rain covers for camera gear while in the field.
 
Plan for walking in light brush (including mild briars) and woods. The wildlife we are pursuing is acclimated to humans and does not seem to care what we are wearing (though you might get their attention if you look like a black bear, a primary deer predator). Camo clothing is not necessary, but it is a good option. I wear mostly camo and part of the reason is to be less obvious to other park visitors.
 
Insects can be annoying here and ticks are reportedly present (I have yet to find one on me at this location). Permethrin and other insect repellent may be appreciated and I also wear a ball cap to help keep gnats out of my eyes (and avoid sunburn). Especially mid-day, shorts may prove the most comfortable option at times.
 
Sign Up or Ask Questions!
 
Contact me at Bryan@Carnathan.com.
 
Whitetail Fawns – Cutest Animals on the Face of This Planet?
Consider this a personal invitation to join me in Rocky Mountain National Park in mid-late September! RMNP is an incredible location (any park with "mountain" in its name has to be great) and the elk rut there is simply awesome, combining for a bucket list wildlife and outdoor photography experience. This trip is timed for the peak of the elk rut combined with what can be the peak of fall aspen color.
 
I have rented an ideally-located (quick access to the hot spots) home for us to stay in. Each participant will have a private room and the home will make a great base for our adventure as well as a great location to gather in for image review. Yes, we'll eat at Smokin Dave's BBQ (maybe more than once). Yes, we'll spend time along Trail Ridge Road (the highest paved road in North America).
 
Plan on hanging out with a small group that shares your passion for photography in a spectacularly scenic location.
 
When and Where
 
1 Opening: Sun, September 15 to Sat, September 21, 2019
 
1 Opening: Sun, September 22 to Sat, September 28, 2019
 
Wait List for 2020
 
We will be based in Estes Park, CO, just outside of Rocky Mountain National Park.
 
This trip is initially offered for 6 full days (other options will be considered – be sure to let me know of your preferred alternative). The plan is to meet in Estes Park on Sunday and we will wrap up after a morning shoot on the last day.
 
Who
 
Hopefully you, along with 3 other participants. Large groups are far more profitable from a business perspective, but seriously photographing wildlife in the field is very challenging in large groups. Keeping the group small means better opportunities and more personal attention. It also means that we can travel together throughout the park in a single SUV.
 
Cost
 
The cost for this 6-day IPT is $2990 including lodging (an approximately $1,000 value) with a 50% deposit locking in your spot (balance is due 90 days prior to the IPT). Email me at Bryan@Carnathan.com to sign up or ask questions!
 
Beautiful Bull Elk, Rocky Mountain National Park
 
What are We Photographing?
 
Our primary photo subject will be wildlife. Wildlife, by definition, is "wild" and that means it is unpredictable and there can be no guarantees. That said, Rocky Mountain National Park is a very reliable location to photograph rocky mountain elk and the bulls should be vying for herds of cows. In addition, the environment/scenery available for backgrounds here is excellent.
 
In addition to elk, we will likely see mule deer and other animals. We will be opportunistic and take advantage of any interesting subjects that we encounter – and discovering those moments are part of the excitement. In addition to the immersive wildlife photography experience, there will certainly be opportunity for some landscape photography. The views from the alpine tundra and Trail Ridge Road are awesome. Alluvial Fan Falls is conveniently located and other subjects abound.
 
Bull Elk and Rocky Mountains
 
Tour/Workshop/Adventure/Expedition
 
While the implied definitions of these terms vary, I see "workshops" typically laid out with a planned schedule and "tours" typically designed to put you in front of subjects at the right time. I'm calling this trip a "tour" because the primary goal is for you to get great images and we will be opportunistic in that regard, making a firm schedule difficult to implement. That said, we will spend a lot of time together and I will teach (including as we are actively photographing), answer questions (please bring many), critique images, assist in editing, etc. throughout our time together. Thus, the educational element will also be a primary part of our time together – an "Instructional Photo Tour".
 
In the field, we will photograph side-by-side. You taking great images home will be a primary goal, but you capturing those images yourself is important and I can best describe what you should do if I am doing it myself at the same time. This also provides the participant opportunity to watch how it is done. Your constant feedback and questions during the IPT are important and will enable me to provide you with the best experience possible.
 
An "expedition" is another type of immersive photography experience and this event involves multiple daily mini-expeditions. Certain is that we will have an adventure.
 
Physical Requirements
 
This will be a modestly strenuous trip, with much of the strain dependent on the size and weight of the gear you are carrying. There will likely be some easy wildlife photography opportunities encountered (possibly in our back yard), but we will be carrying our gear through the woods and tall grass over hilly terrain at times, often attempting to keep ahead of moving wildlife. Some trail hiking is planned. Thus, one needs to be in reasonable physical condition.
 
What is Included
 
As mentioned, I have a house rented for this tour and lodging is included. This home has 5 bedrooms along with 3 or 4 bathroooms. Transportation during the experience along with everything described in the Tour/Workshop/Adventure/Expedition section above is included. By not including the items listed below in the fee, individuals are able choose their level of spending.
 
What is Not Included
 
Transportation to/from the house and the required National Park entrance fee. Denver International Airport is convenient and often an inexpensive destination from an airfare perspective. I'm happy to attempt connection with other participants for sharing a ride to/from the airport.
 
Food. For expediency, breakfast will be on your own at the house. Typically, we will come back to the house after the morning shoot and will stop for lunch before heading out. We may pick up food to go for the evening, but will be flexible. The house is close to a small grocery store, a deli and a couple of small restaurants. Nearby Estes Park has many food options, but we will mostly avoid the heavy traffic in town there unless there is group consensus to visit a destination there.
 
Schedule
 
Our best opportunities will be found early and late in the day and we will target these times. The plans are all very flexible and we can target any specific interests the group has.
 
Bull Elk in Rut, Rocky Mountain National Park
 
Cancellation Policy
 
Travel insurance is strongly recommended. If a cancellation notice is received between 90 and 179 days before the workshop start date, a 50% refund of any payments made will be provided. If a cancellation notice is provided within less than 90 days of the workshop, no refund of payments made will be provided unless ... regardless of the cancellation notice received date, any workshop openings that are re-filled will be refunded payment in full minus a $195 administrative fee.
 
Let's Do This! Sign Up Now!
 
Email me at Bryan@Carnathan.com to sign up or ask questions!
 
Camera Gear Needed
 
Aside from a great attitude and a strong interest in learning wildlife photography, you are going to need some gear and while most cameras with a telephoto lens will work, mid-upper-grade gear should be considered for best results from this event.
 
There will be times when a fast frame rate is beneficial, but rut posturing is often done at slower speeds and I usually opt for higher resolution cameras that typically do not have the fastest-available frame rates. A DSLR camera or a late-model MILC (Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera) should be in your bag.
 
A telephoto lens or lenses will be needed with a full-frame equivalent of at least 400mm (250mm on an APS-C) suggested and having longer focal lengths available will be appreciated at times (full frame 600mm equivalent is ideal). Wildlife activity is greatest early and late, so wide apertures are often an advantage and the wide aperture's ability to blur the background can be useful. Any telephoto lens can work, but there may be times when an f/4 or wider aperture is preferred. This is a great event to break out your big lenses for and it is also a great time to try a new one, perhaps via renting.
 
My current plan is to take a pair of high resolution cameras such as the Canon EOS 5Ds R along with a 600mm lens such as the Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM Lens (along with a Black Rapid shoulder strap to carry it with) and a telephoto zoom lens such as the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens for my primary wildlife kit. In this location, I sometimes carry the second camera and smaller telephoto lens in a Lowepro Toploader Case.
 
I primarily use a monopod while photographing wildlife in this location. It is not as stable as a tripod and requires more effort to use, but it is much faster to set up and adjust. While neither are mandatory, one or both is preferred and I always take both.
 
We will likely make use of a full range of landscape photography gear, including ultra-wide to wide angle lenses along with circular polarizer and neutral density filters. I'll bring a variety of other lenses and accessories.
 
Bring adequate memory card capacity, enough batteries to last at least a day and enough chargers to restore that capability overnight. Bringing a laptop is highly recommended, enabling review of your images throughout the time we have together. Bring an external hard drive for an additional level of backup. Bring a flashlight.
 
Consider what failure of any piece of gear means for your experience and consider bringing a backup for items identified as critical.
 
As always, feel free to ask us for gear advice.
 
Frosty Bull Elk, Rocky Mountain National Park
 
Weather / Clothing
 
The weather in RMNP in late September is typically very nice, though cool and sometimes even cold (mostly mornings and late evenings). Especially at higher altitudes in the park, snow can even come into play. Dressing in layers is the best plan. Rain protection may be very appreciated at times, including rain covers for camera gear while in the field.
 
Plan for walking in woods and tall meadow grass (that can be wet at times). The wildlife we are pursuing is acclimated to humans and does not seem to care what we are wearing. Camo clothing is not necessary, but it is an option.
 
Altitude
 
The altitude at Estes Park is 7,500' and Trail Ridge Road reaches altitudes over 12,000'. If you've never experienced altitude sickness, I assure you that it is not fun. For those of us traveling from low altitudes, staying overnight, at least in Denver, the day before significant activity is a good idea.
 
I am authorized by the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, to conduct services in Rocky Mountain National Park.
 
Sign Up or Ask Questions!
 
Contact me at Bryan@Carnathan.com.
 
Bugling Elk in the Frost, Rocky Mountain National Park
One of my primary goals is to help you get great images and I'd love for you to join me for 3 or 6 days of wildlife and outdoor photography in this great location. I have again cleared space in the schedule and have the necessary Shenandoah National Park permit in hand.
 
When and Where: Sun, November 10 to Wed, November 13, 2019 and/or Wed, November 13 - Sat, November 16, 2019 in Shenandoah National Park
 
This trip is offered in a choice of 3 or 6 days (other options will be considered). The plan is to meet at the lodge on Sunday and/or Wed mid-day and we will wrap up after a morning shoot on the last day.
 
Who
 
Hopefully you, along with 3 others. Large groups are far more profitable from a business perspective, but seriously photographing wildlife in the field is very challenging in large groups. Keeping the group small means better opportunities and more personal attention. It also means that we can travel together throughout the park in a single SUV.
 
Cost
 
The cost for this IPT is $995 per 3 days with a 50% deposit locking in your spot (balance is due 90 days prior to the IPT). Email me at Bryan@Carnathan.com to sign up or ask questions!
 
First-Light Buck, Shenandoah National Park
 
What are We Photographing?
 
Our primary photo subject will be wildlife. Wildlife, by definition, is "wild" and that means it is unpredictable and there can be no guarantees. That said, Shenandoah National Park is a very reliable location to photograph whitetail deer and the environment/scenery here is quite photogenic.
 
During much of the year, whitetail buck in SNP have their heads down feeding. That changes during the rut and whitetail bucks exhibit great behavior at this time of the year. Late fall colors provide our backdrop and very few park visitors are expected at this time of the year, just prior to the last lodge closing for the season.
 
Deer are not the only wildlife subject found here and black bears sometimes avail themselves as subjects along with a variety of birds and other smaller mammals. We will be opportunistic and take advantage of any subjects that we encounter – and discovering those moments are part of the excitement. In addition to the immersive wildlife photography experience, there will certainly be opportunity for some landscape photography.
 
My time in the field is limited and I look for locations with a high probability of good photo opportunities when I make the time investment. Shenandoah National Park rarely lets me down in that regard. Basically, we will work hard to improve your photography skills, including photo critiques if desired, along with capturing some great images. And, we'll have fun along the way, hanging out with a group sharing the passion.
 
A Sense of Urgency for this Trip
 
As I mentioned in the previous trip invitation, CWD (Chronic Wasting Disease) has been detected within 11 miles of SNP (according to the SNP wildlife biologist I talked to in Mar 2018). This awful disease is always fatal to deer and when it reaches within 5 miles of the park, implementation of an already-established plan will significantly reduce the deer population here. That means this awesome experience is at high risk and that is one of the reasons I have made this park a priority.
 
Tour/Workshop/Adventure/Expedition
 
While the implied definitions of these terms vary, I see "workshops" typically laid out with a planned schedule and "tours" typically designed to put you in front of subjects at the right time. I'm calling this trip a "tour" because the primary goal is for you to get great images and we will be opportunistic in that regard, making a firm schedule difficult to implement. That said, we will spend a lot of time together and I will teach (including as we are actively photographing), answer questions (please bring many), critique images, assist in editing, etc. throughout our time together. Thus, the educational element will also be a primary part of our time together – an "Instructional Photo Tour".
 
In the field, we will photograph side-by-side. You taking great images home will be a primary goal, but you capturing those images yourself is important and I can best describe what you should do if I am doing it myself at the same time. This also provides the participant opportunity to watch how it is done. Your constant feedback and questions during the IPT are important and will enable me to provide you with the best experience possible.
 
An "expedition" is another type of immersive photography experience and this event involves multiple daily mini-expeditions. Certain is that we will have an adventure.
 
Physical Requirements
 
This will be a modestly strenuous trip, with much of the strain dependent on the size and weight of the gear you are carrying. There will likely be some easy wildlife photography opportunities encountered, but we will be carrying our gear through the woods, tall grass and light brush over hilly terrain at times, often attempting to keep ahead of moving wildlife. Thus, one needs to be in reasonable physical condition.
 
What is Included
 
Transportation during the experience along with everything described in the Tour/Workshop/Adventure/Expedition section above is included. By not including the items listed below in the fee, individuals are able choose their level of spending.
 
What is Not Included
 
If staying for the entire duration of the trip and as long as our schedules align, I can provide transportation to and from the Dulles International Airport region or from anywhere directly on my route from the north — primarily RT 81. Otherwise, transportation to/from Skyland Resort is not included. Also, the National Park-required entrance fee is additionally required.
 
Lodging. We will be staying at the Skyland Resort, a national park lodge. I usually get a basic room, but other options are available including cabins. I am happy to connect you with other participants if a shared room is desired.
 
Food. Because of the remoteness of this location, our food will primarily consist of what is offered at the Skyland Resort (dining room, take out or tap room) along with any food brought along into the park. We will typically begin photographing before food services are open so I usually pack breakfast to eat in my room prior to the morning shoots. I take a cooler with jugs of ice and ice is available at the lodge (you need a bag/bucket to transport it from the ice machine). I suggest packing granola bars and other snacks/food along to keep energy levels up while photographing as we often decide we don't want to leave the action to find lunch. Sandwiches and other snacks are usually available for purchase at Skyland Resort. Plan to have water or other drink available to take with you.
 
Schedule
 
At this time of the year, the days are getting shorter and the nights are correspondingly getting longer. Our best opportunities will be found early and late in the day and we will target these times, but it is usually worth staying out all day. The sun is relatively low in the sky and the animals often remain active during the day. The plans are all very flexible and we can target any specific interests the group has.
 
Big Meadows Whitetail Buck
 
Cancellation Policy
 
Travel insurance is strongly recommended. If a cancellation notice is received between 90 and 179 days before the workshop start date, a 50% refund of any payments made will be provided. If a cancellation notice is provided within less than 90 days of the workshop, no refund of payments made will be provided ... regardless of the cancellation notice received date, any workshop openings that are re-filled will be refunded payment in full minus a $195 administrative fee.
 
Let's Do This! Sign Up Now!
 
Email me at Bryan@Carnathan.com to sign up or ask questions!
 
10-Point Whitetail Buck
 
Camera Gear Needed
 
Aside from a great attitude and a strong interest in learning wildlife photography, you are going to need some gear and while most cameras with a telephoto lens will work, mid-upper-grade gear should be considered for best results from this event.
 
When photographing bucks in rut, I am not as concerned about a fast frame rate as with some other subjects. There will be times when the fast rate is beneficial, but rut posturing is often done at slower speeds and I usually opt for higher resolution cameras. A DSLR camera or a late-model MILC (Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera) should be in your bag.
 
A telephoto lens or lenses will be needed with a full-frame equivalent of at least 400mm (250mm on an APS-C) suggested and having longer focal lengths available will be appreciated at times. Wildlife activity is greatest early and late, so wide apertures are often an advantage and the wide aperture's ability to blur the background can be useful. Any telephoto lens can work, but there may be times when an f/4 or wider aperture is preferred. This is a great event to break out your big lenses for and it is also a great time to try a new one, perhaps via renting.
 
My current plan is to take a high resolution camera such as the Canon EOS 5Ds R along with a 600mm lens such as the Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS III USM Lens and a telephoto zoom lens such as the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens for my primary wildlife kit. I'll bring a variety of other lenses and accessories including a Black Rapid shoulder strap to carry the big lenses with.
 
I primarily use a monopod while photographing wildlife in this location. It is not as stable as a tripod and requires more effort to use, but it is much faster to set up and adjust. While neither are mandatory, one or both is preferred and I always take both.
 
We can potentially make use of a full range of landscape photography gear, including ultra-wide to wide angle lenses along with circular polarizer and neutral density filters.
 
Bringing a laptop is highly recommended, enabling review of your images throughout the time we have together. Bring an external hard drive for an additional level of backup. Bring adequate memory card capacity, enough batteries to last at least a day and enough chargers to restore that capability overnight.
 
Consider what failure of any piece of gear means for your experience and consider bringing a backup for items identified as critical.
 
As always, feel free to ask us for gear advice.
 
Whitetail Buck in Morning Light
 
Weather / Clothing
 
The weather in late November is typically very nice, though cool and sometimes even cold, in Shenandoah National Park. However, the mountain can create its own weather and that can be at least somewhat unpredictable. Rain gear may be very appreciated at times, including rain covers for camera gear while in the field.
 
Plan for walking in light brush (including mild briars) and woods. The wildlife we are pursuing is acclimated to humans and does not seem to care what we are wearing (though you might get their attention if you dress in all black like a black bear, a primary deer predator). Camo clothing is not necessary, but it is a good option. I wear mostly camo and part of the reason is to be less obvious to other park visitors, though there are not many at this time of the year (aside from a wave of guests on Sunday before Veteran's day).
 
Insects are not typically bothersome in mid-November. Ticks are reportedly present, though I have yet to find one on me.
 
Sign Up or Ask Questions!
 
Contact me at Bryan@Carnathan.com.
 
Buck in the Brush, Shenandoah National Park
Acadia National Park is considered the "Crown Jewel of the North Atlantic Coast." Consuming about half of Mount Desert Island on the coast of Maine, Acadia National Park has significant photographic appeal in all seasons, but it is especially appealing in my favorite season, fall.
 
No one can predict long in advance when the ideal fall foliage color will occur, but this tour's dates have been within the reported peak foliage color time period for the last many years. Regardless of the foliage, the New England coast does not get better than Mount Desert Island's rocky coast that can provide a different experience even daily, with varying tide schedules and especially with surf conditions that can range from quite calm to very rough.
 
One of my primary goals is to help you get great images and I'd love for you to join me to photograph the landscape in this great location. Beginners can start with the basics and all, including the most-advanced photographers, will be positioned in ideal locations to build out their portfolios. Unleash your creativity in this field-intensive tour in a world-class outdoor classroom environment — Acadia National Park.
 
Plan on hanging out in a beautifully scenic location with a small group that shares your passion for photography. Bring your friends, make new friends. Just putting this tour together has made me excited!
 
Rays of Sunlight on the Ocean, Acadia National Park
 
When and Where: Tue, Oct 15 through Sun, Oct 20, 2019 in Acadia National Park
 
The plan is to meet at the inn on Tuesday evening for a short orientation/meet & greet, preparing for an early AM shoot. We will wrap up after an early morning shoot on Sunday.
 
Who
 
Join me and up to four other participants (2 participant minimum). Large groups are far more profitable from a workshop business perspective, but serious photography in the field becomes challenging in large groups. At least some of the time, someone in a large group is not getting an ideal position to photograph from and/or they are not getting the attention they need/deserve. Keeping the group small means better photo opportunities and more personal attention. It also means that we can travel together throughout the park in a single large SUV.
 
Upon having two participants signed up, I will secure the necessary Acadia National Park authorization.
 
Cost
 
The cost for this IPT is $1,790 with a 50% deposit locking in your spot (balance is due 90 days prior to the IPT). Email me at Bryan@Carnathan.com to sign up or ask questions!
 
Boulder Beach, Acadia National Park
 
What are We Photographing?
 
Primarily, we will be photographing the landscape with taking your skills to a new level being one goal and taking home some portfolio-grade images being another. As we will be in picturesque harbor towns, including Bar Harbor, we will flex our street photography (harborography? harborscapes?) muscles a bit as well.
 
Some of the headlining locations we intend to photograph include:
 
  • Cadillac Mountain
  • Bass Harbor Head Light
  • Jordan Pond and The Bubbles
  • Otter Point and Otter Cliffs
  • Boulder Beach
  • Sand Beach
  • Carriage Roads and Bridges, Trails, Paths, and Other Roads
  • Bar Harbor and Other Maritime Villages
  • Mountains, Lakes, Forests, Rocks, Flora and Many Other Subjects
As I often say, my time in the field is limited and I look for locations with a high probability of good photo opportunities when making the time investment. Acadia National Park is nearly a sure-thing in that regard. There is something here to photograph in nearly any weather condition and in any season.
 
Note that we should expect to see wildlife on this trip and we can be opportunistic in pursuit of wildlife photos, but I have not been too successful photographing wildlife here, so do not hold high expectations in this regard.
 
What are We Learning?
 
A full range of landscape topics will be encountered with a short list including:
 
  • Location Scouting and lighting evaluation
  • Composition including perspective, focal length, and camera position choices
  • Finding order within chaos
  • Capturing fall color
  • Exposure including exposure bracketing and HDR
  • Making mid-day images special including Circular Polarizer and Neutral Density (including 10-stop) filter use
  • Motion blurs including moving water
  • Reflections, details, colors, sunstars
  • Sunrise, sunset, blue hour strategies
  • Simplifying concepts
  • Photo critiques
Basically, we will work hard to improve your photography skills and capture some great images. We'll have fun along the way, hanging out with a group that shares the passion.
 
Lobster Trap Buoys, Acadia National Park
 
Typical Schedule
 
We will rise early and be at key locations to photograph at first light, returning mid-morning for breakfast and a rest.
 
Late in the morning or early in the afternoon, we will head back out to explore, focusing on locations that can provide interesting mid-day photo opportunities.
 
Early to mid-afternoon (remember that we ate a big mid-morning breakfast), we will stop for lunch and begin preparations for the afternoon shoot. Late afternoon will find us in a location ideal for capturing the last light of the day.
 
While most other photographers we encounter will leave when the sun sets, the best is often still to come and we will often stay until the blue in the sky is gone. We may stay late enough to capture the stars in some locations.
 
Stopping for dinner will round out the day.
 
Taking time to review images will be fit into the schedule as makes sense.
 
I will have a tentative schedule, but plans will remain highly flexible to accommodate weather conditions and targeting any specific interests the group has. As adequate sleep is a key to good decisions in the field, we will try to work that into the schedule.
 
Physical Requirements
 
This will be a modestly strenuous trip, with much of the strain dependent on the size and weight of the gear you are carrying. There will be many easily accessible photography opportunities, but there will be some hiking with our gear including up and down hills and over rocks on the coast.
 
Tour / Workshop / Adventure / Expedition
 
While the implied definitions of these terms vary, I see "workshops" typically laid out with a planned schedule and "tours" typically designed to put you in front of subjects at the right time. I'm calling this trip a "tour" because the primary goal is for you to get great images and we will be opportunistic in that regard, making a firm schedule difficult to implement. That said, we will spend a lot of time together and I will teach (especially when we are actively photographing), answer questions (please bring many), critique images, assist in editing, etc. throughout our time together. Thus, the educational element will also be a primary part of our time together – an "Instructional Photo Tour".
 
At least some of the time in the field, we will photograph side-by-side. You taking home great images is always the primary goal, but you learning to capture those images yourself is important and often I can best describe what you should do if I am doing it myself at the same time. This also provides participants the opportunity to watch how it is done, a leading by example approach. Your constant feedback and questions during the IPT are important and will enable me to provide you with the best experience possible.
 
An "expedition" is another type of immersive photography experience and this event involves multiple daily mini-expeditions. Certain is that we will have an adventure.
 
Afterglow, Acadia National Park
 
What is Included
 
Transportation during the experience along with everything described in the Tour/Workshop/Adventure/Expedition section above is included. By not including the items listed below in the fee, individuals are able to choose their level of spending.
 
What is Not Included
 
Lodging. We will be staying at the conveniently-located Acadia Inn, Bar Harbor, where a block of rooms is planned to be held for us with a very solid discount provided (100% of the discount is being passed on to participants, discount available until August 13th). The Acadia Inn will provide us with breakfast each mid-morning (after our sunrise session).
 
"Guests at the Acadia Inn enjoy many excellent hotel amenities, including our complimentary continental breakfast, with added hot items served daily between 6:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. We rise early each morning to cook up hearty and delicious meals, such as omelets and sausage gravy and biscuits. You can always enjoy cold cereals, oatmeal, fresh fruit, bagels, English muffins, yogurt, French toast, blueberry and orange-cranberry muffins, a selection of fruit juices, coffee, tea and hot chocolate."
 
I am happy to connect you with other participants if a shared room is desired. Also, consider bringing your spouse or family. Nonparticipating guests are not included in the tour, but the town of Bar Harbor and the entire Mount Desert Island area are full of things to do. You are welcome to stay at another location but will be expected to be timely in meeting at the Acadia Inn (and will have to source your own breakfast).
 
Transportation to/from Acadia Inn in Bar Harbor, Maine. For those flying into Bangor Airport, shuttle service to Bar Harbor is available.
 
Food. As mentioned, Acadia Inn provides a complimentary breakfast and we will be sourcing our other meals from various local restaurants. We will be starting very early in the morning and not returning for breakfast until mid-morning, so breakfast bars or similar should be along with you. Plan to have water or other drink available to take with you. Granola bars and similar may be appreciated when the time between meals gets a bit long (such as when we get into a great photo situation).
 
The Acadia National Park-required entrance fee. The national parks require each participant in a workshop to have an entrance pass.
 
Cancellation Policy
 
Travel insurance is strongly recommended. I have successfully used Travel Guard for this protection.
 
If a cancellation notice is received greater than 180 days before the workshop start date, a full refund of any payments made minus a $195 administrative fee will be provided. If a cancellation notice is received between 90 and 179 days before the workshop start date, a 50% refund of any payments made minus a $195 administrative fee will be provided. If a cancellation notice is received within less than 90 days of the workshop, no refund of payments made will be provided. Regardless of the cancellation notice received date, any workshop openings that are re-filled will result in payment refunded in full minus a $195 administrative fee.
 
Let's Do This! Sign Up Now!
 
Email me at Bryan@Carnathan.com to sign up or ask questions!
 
Camera Gear Needed
 
Aside from a great attitude and a strong interest in learning landscape photography, you are going to need some gear for this trip and most cameras with a standard zoom lens will work fine.
 
A fast frame rate is not needed. A high-performing AF system is not needed. Most DSLR cameras and MILC (Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera) will work fine. Ideal would be to have a high-resolution current or recent model DSLR or MILC with an assortment of lenses available.
 
Covering full-frame-equivalent focal length ranges from 16mm through 200mm is comfortable/ideal and from 11mm up to 400mm could be appreciated at times. An image stabilized general purpose zoom may be appreciated for walk-around use. A wide aperture wide angle lens would be ideal for any night photography opportunities we decide to take advantage of. There will be opportunities to make use of a macro lens.
 
This is a great opportunity to try some new gear via renting.
 
I suggest having a camera backpack or similar available for gear transport in the field. A tripod is going to be a key accessory as will circular polarizers and neutral density filters, ideally covering up to at least 10-stops. A remote release will be useful. Rain covers for camera gear and backpacks are recommended and microfiber cloths should be kept handy.
 
At least one flashlight is mandatory and a headlight is highly recommended. We will likely find ourselves hiking out of locations in the dark and a headlight will free up hands.
 
Bringing a laptop is highly recommended, enabling review of your images throughout our time together. An external hard drive will provide an additional level of backup. Bring adequate memory card capacity, enough camera batteries to last at least a day and enough chargers to restore that capability overnight.
 
Consider what failure of any piece of gear means for your experience and consider bringing a backup for items identified as critical.
 
As always, feel free to ask us for gear advice.
 
Fall Hoar Frost on Cadillac Mountain, Acadia National Park
 
Weather / Clothing
 
The mid-October weather in Acadia National Park is typically comfortable. Expect the mornings and evenings to be crisp and cold (I've encountered frost at this time of the year) with comfortably-cool temperatures by mid-day. A layered clothing strategy is ideal. Rain gear may be very appreciated at times.
 
Bring your favorite insect repellent as the flying pests could be a nuisance, especially at sunset along the water.
 
Rainbow Over Atlantic Ocean, Acadia National Park
 
Sign Up or Ask Questions!
 
Contact me at Bryan@Carnathan.com.
 
Champlain Mountain, Acadia National Park
Post Date: 1/1/2019 10:30:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, December 31, 2018
Is your new year starting with fireworks? Photograph them!
 
If you've photographed fireworks long/frequently enough to be bored with the results, it is time to get creative.
 
Visiting the local annual fireworks show is a tradition for our family. With years of the normal motion-blurred fireworks images already on the drives, creating unique imagery has become more challenging. To create uniqueness this year, I used the fireworks focus blur strategy for practically the entire show. At least for me, this strategy results in a very low keeper rate. But, having a few of these images that worked out well was worth more to me than having 75 or 100 that looked the same as those captured in previous years.
 
Let's go over the gear selection for this shot/shoot. A fast frame rate was of no importance and high resolution, sharp imagery was. Thus, the Canon EOS 5Ds R was the perfect choice. The approximate focal length range needed was known and any the 24-something normal zoom lenses would comfortably cover it. I opted for the Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS II USM Lens over the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens because a wide aperture was of no importance and ... I had fewer sample images from the newer 24-105mm lens.
 
A solid tripod was needed, but with over 1 mile of round trip walking required for this shooting location, it could not be heavy. The Really Right Stuff TVC-34 Carbon Fiber Tripod was a perfect choice. A capability-matching tripod head was of course needed. The shooting was going to be 100% in the dark and I wanted all images to be completely level despite the usually-requiring re-framing when the first rockets launch. The UniqBall UBH 45X Ball Head, with its unique capabilities, was the perfect choice. Once the head was leveled, pan and tilt could be adjusted without levelness being changed.
 
Fireworks are usually launched in the dark and many of us immediately think that large apertures and high ISO settings will therefore be needed. But, that is not the case. Fireworks are so bright that the opposite problem is often encountered. In order to avoid the softening effects of diffraction at the tiny aperture opening required for an ideal fireworks burst exposure, a 2-stop neutral density filter was used. As the f/10 aperture used for this image is still slightly narrower than the aperture where diffraction becomes slightly noticeable, a 3-stop ND would have been a slightly better choice.
 
Getting the entire fireworks burst in a single image requires a long exposure. The tripod ensures that the camera is stationary during that exposure (avoiding wavy fireworks trails), but the shutter must be opened without causing camera motion. Because timing of the start and finish of the exposure is critical for fireworks photography, a remote release is a requirement.
 
Fireworks are in fast motion. Thus, their brightness in the image is determined by aperture and ISO. The shutter speed controls how long the rocket and resulting explosion is captured. Since the ideal time duration varies, Bulb mode is the ideal choice. With Bulb mode selected, the release button is pressed, held and released to time with the launches.
 
Fireworks bursts vary greatly in size. In general, it is better to frame slightly too wide than than slightly too tight. It is easier to crop than it is to build missing light trails. My choice is often to let the largest burst go out of the frame, but keep 90 percent of the explosions entirely framed in black.
 
A fireworks image seemed fitting to lead a Happy New Year well-wishing post and that wish is what I most want to pass along here. Thanks for a great 2018 and Happy New Year 2019!
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
Post Date: 12/31/2018 9:38:43 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
From the Adorama YouTube Channel:
 
David Bergman shows you how to photograph reflective objects like a wine glass In Ep 148 of Two Minute Tips.
Post Date: 12/31/2018 10:01:00 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Sony:
 
Benefits and Improvements from the latest update
 
  • Resolves a problem caused by specific third-party memory cards, where the cards cannot be recognized by Sony cameras
[Note 1] When updating to this version from a lower version than "Ver. 4.00", the FTP transfer feature and Wired LAN settings are initialised. You will have to configure these two items again. The names of FTP server 1, FTP server 2, and FTP server 3 will be kept, but other items will be initialised. If you have set the Wired LAN Settings to Manual, each of the manually configured settings will be initialised and the Wired LAN Settings will be set to Auto.
 
[Note 2] When the camera is updated from Ver. 3.00 to this version, the registered settings for Fn (function) menu may not be kept. In that event, please customise the menu to your preferred settings again. Setting: [MENU]-[Camera Settings2]-[Function Menu Set.]
 
Download: Sony a9 Firmware v.4.10 - Windows | Macintosh
Post Date: 12/31/2018 9:45:33 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the B&H Photo Video YouTube Channel:
 
Over 45 years ago, B&H began as a small and humble retailer, selling cameras and photography equipment to its customers. Now, with over 400,000 products for sale, we still strive to provide the best customer service and the most competitive prices. Thank you for allowing us to serve you.
Post Date: 12/31/2018 7:31:17 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Saturday, December 29, 2018
The titles "How to Turn Water into Gold" and "On Golden Pond" seemed also appropriate for this image. Regardless, gold was the theme here.
 
During my stay at Red River Camps in northern Maine this past summer, a pair of loons were raising their chicks on Island Pond. Especially unusual was that the chicks were very small for the mid-August timeframe. The loon's first nest had been attacked by a predator and the adult pair started over. With winter arriving early here, there was concern that the chicks would not be able to fly in time for migration and biologists were monitoring their progress. But, having small chicks available was a bonus from a photography perspective.
 
Hanging with these loons required a watercraft and a small canoe was my best option. A light wind made keeping the canoe properly positioned a big challenge and probably more time was spent paddling than photographing. The sun was setting and maintaining a position between the sun and the loons was the goal.
 
The adults were constantly diving for food and moving around the lake while doing so, but fortunately, they were in the area of the lake receiving the latest direct light when the sun went behind the trees. The color difference between shade light and a late day sun light is dramatic with shade light typically being very cool and direct setting sun light being very warm. As the sun went down, the water became shaded before the shoreline and shaded water usually shows reflections very well.
 
The photograph shared here was only lightly processed. The primary edit was selecting a custom white balance point using a patch of the adult loon's solid white feathers as the basis. Those feathers were in the shade and the result was a color temperature setting of 10500 K being established. At this setting, the reflected sunlit background becomes very golden and a slight saturation increase (+18 on a -100 to 100 scale in Lightroom) finishes off the liquid gold.
 
Be looking for opportunities to use the light color mismatch of sun and shade to your creative advantage when out photographing. The subject in the shade, background in the sun option as shared here often works well, but the opposite can also work, creating a blue-toned background with a properly white-balanced subject.
 
For those with Nikon-based kits, the Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6E AF-S VR Lens is a great option for handheld wildlife photography. The D850 is my current Nikon camera of choice for this purpose.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
330mm  f/5.6  1/640s
ISO 1000
7384 x 4923px
Post Date: 12/29/2018 9:56:17 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, December 28, 2018

 
From Bloomberg:
 
As a professional Instagram star, Meghan Young gets paid to climb beautiful mountains and post about those adventures to her fans. It sounds like a glamorous job, but a surprising amount of work goes into making it a full-time career. Bloomberg Technology's Aki Ito tagged along on a recent trip to learn more. This is the sixth episode of Next Jobs, a mini-documentary series about careers of the future.
Post Date: 12/28/2018 12:36:39 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
For those looking to add a Speedlite flash to their photography kits and don't need the highest-end option available, the Canon 430EX III-RT and 470EX-AI are budget-priced, feature-filled mid-grade options worthy of consideration. With that in mind, we'll compare/contrast the features of the 430EX III-RT and 470EX-AI flashes to see which one might be best for your needs.
 
Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT and Speedlite 470EX-AI Shared Primary Features
 
  • Angle of Flash Coverage: 24-105mm, 14mm with diffuser
  • Infrared AF-assist beaming
  • E-TTL II/E-TTL, Manual modes
  • High Speed Sync
  • Flash Exposure Lock (FEL)
  • Flash Exposure Bracketing (FEB) in Slave Mode
  • Flash Exposure Compensation
  • Second Curtain Flash Sync
  • Modeling Flash
  • Color Temperature Info Communication
  • Supports Flash Settings by Camera Menu
  • Custom Functions: 10
Primary Advantages of the Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT Flash
 
  • Radio/optical transmitter and receiver vs. optical receiver only
  • Remote shutter release capable vs. N/A
  • Battery Life: 180-1200 flashes vs. 140–966
  • Recycling Time (Alkaline): 0.1 to 3.5 sec vs. 0.1 - 5.5 sec
  • Size: 2.8 x 4.5 x 3.9" (70.5 x 113.8 x 98.2mm) vs. 2.94 x 5.13 x 4.14" (74.6 x 130.4 x 105.1mm)
  • Weight: 10.4 oz (295g) vs. 13.6 oz (385g)
  • Lower price
Primary Advantages of the Canon Speedlite 470EX-AI Flash
 
  • Flash head automatic bounce angle determination
  • Guide Number @ 105mm: 47m (154') vs. 43m (141')
  • AF Assist Beam Points: up to 16 (at 28mm) vs. 1
  • Flash Head Movement Range Up: 0-120° vs. 45, 60, 75 and 90°
  • Flash Head Movement Range Left: 0-180° vs. 60, 75, 90, 120, and 150°
  • Flash Head Movement Range Right: 0-180° vs. 60, 75, 90, 120, 150 and 180°
Who should opt for the Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT?
 
If you endeavor to use (and control) multiple light setups, and want to avoid the limitations of optical (line-of-sight) triggering, the Canon 430EX III-RT will be the best choice for your needs. While the Canon 470EX-AI can act as a slave in optically-triggered setups, the Canon 430EX III-RT can act as a master or slave in radio or optically-triggered setups. The flexibility that the 430EX III-RT's wireless features afford is immense, greatly increasing the usefulness of the flash. Also, those wanting a smaller/lighter flash atop their cameras, photographers who prioritize battery life and/or recycling time or persons with a limited budget will find the 430EX III-RT to be a better flash for their needs.
 
Who should opt for the Canon Speedlite 470EX-AI Flash?
 
Those photographers who appreciate the convenience of a flash that automatically calculates the optimal bounce direction will find the Canon Speedlite 470EX-AI Flash's auto-rotating head to be the deciding factor. Wedding / event photographers and those new to Speedlite flash use will especially appreciate the 470EX-AI's unique auto-bounce capability, allowing for flattering subject lighting with little effort or experience required. If optical triggering is sufficient for your multiple flash setup needs, the 470EX-AI can easily be incorporated as a slave unit. Few will find the 470EX-AI's slightly higher guide number to be a deciding factor, but the flash's extra power could prove beneficial in certain situations.
 
Authorized Retailers
 
Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT – B&H | Adorama | Amazon US | Canon USA / Refurb.
Canon Speedlite 470EX-AI – B&H | Adorama | Amazon US | Canon USA
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/28/2018 10:09:02 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
In this episode, Mark Wallace demonstrates the power of editing with frequency separation in Adobe Photoshop CC 2019. Mark walks through the entire process, from setting up the lighting, the shoot, and all the steps involved in editing your images.
Post Date: 12/28/2018 9:08:37 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
You have until January 15, 2019 to register any newly purchased Tamron lenses (teleconverters and Tap-In Console are excluded) to qualify for Tamron's VIP Club Membership for 2019. Benefits include:
 
  • Bonus Rebates on Tamron lenses
  • Discounts on Non-Warranty Repairs
  • Tamron Magazine Subscription
  • Exclusive Photo Contest
  • Opportunity to attend the VIP Workshop Summit (platinum only) and plenty of Tamron swag!
Registration is not complete until proof of purchase is provided and you have received confirmation the registration process is complete. New members are admitted annually on Feb 15 and members meeting club level requirements will be notified via the email address on file.
 
See here for a complete list of membership benefits, details and rules.
 
Authorized Tamron Retailers: B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Category: Tamron News
Post Date: 12/28/2018 8:35:57 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, December 27, 2018

 
Mike Mandel’s Baseball Photographer Trading Cards (1975) is more or less a standard set of trading cards, except for one thing: rather than famous athletes, Mandel’s cards feature photographers. For the series, Mandel shot some of the greatest photographers of the twentieth century, including Imogen Cunningham, Ed Ruscha, and even Ansel Adams, whose portrait session didn’t go quite as planned.
Post Date: 12/27/2018 7:33:08 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, December 26, 2018
A fresh snowfall leaving a blanket of white was calling me outdoors this morning. The snow has just subsided and the wind was arriving, promising to clear the snow from the tree branches, so time was of the essence. With the M50 and EF-M 18-150 mounted, I had an ideal combination in my hands.
 
The snow was beautiful and covering everything, but a good composition was not obvious. Finding order within chaos is frequently what landscape photography is about and that was the challenge I faced. Finding the order within chaos often means isolating a portion of the scene. The huge focal length range made available by the EF-M 18-150 was ideal for this task.
 
Exploring the scene through the viewfinder, this section of a pair of hickory trees caught my attention. The contrast between the trunks and branches and the snow and background fog was strong. As much as possible, I avoided having the larger branches leave the frame, hoping to use the large trunks as leading lines, but without branch lines leading viewers' eyes out of the picture. The distant trees visible at the bottom of the frame provide a small hint to what lies beyond otherwise hindered by fog visibility. The overall balance in the frame is always important and this composition seemed to check that box.
 
Good composition is often easiest to determine while reviewing images and this one was my favorite from this short session.
 
Check out our Winter Photography Tips page for more ideas on how to spend you winter.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
57mm  f/8.0  1/80s
ISO 100
6000 x 4000px
Post Date: 12/26/2018 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, December 25, 2018
Putting up the Christmas tree is a highly-anticipated annual event at our house. We visit a local tree farm, driving up into the hills to select the perfect tree. The off-road 4x4 driving with the family might be my favorite part of the entire process. That, and causing the girls to complain about the trees I suggest. They think we need the tallest tree available, although I'm not fond of driving home with an enormous tree across the back of the SUV (on a Hitch Haul), usually with the trunk barely clearing the guard rail while the top is hovering above the road's center line on the other side.
 
I "get" to put the finally-agreed-upon tree in the stand (twice this year – it ran out of water and needed to have the stump cut off again to eliminate the sap seal) and try to keep it upright for the season (we understand firsthand that a fully decorated tree falling over is traumatic, at least to young kids). Oh, and I also "get" to string the lights, regardless of the height. Photographing the Christmas tree is the last job and one of my favorites. Who can resist capturing all of those sparkling lights?
 
While I photograph the result of a lot of work every year, I don't remember if I've ever used the same lens more than once for this task. There always seems to be a new one on hand that would work great for the task. This year, the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L USM Lens on a Canon EOS R seemed like a perfect option.
 
Deciding on a composition is always an early decision for this task and this year I opted for a straight-on view from a level camera position. I wanted the windows to remain vertically straight and any camera tilt would create converging or angled lines. I determined that the timing for this photo should be during the blue hour so that a touch of color would show through the windows. With windows in the frame, reflections had to be controlled and in this case that meant that I needed a dark house. So, an afternoon when the girls were going Christmas shopping seemed ideal. That way, the have the house would be empty with no one's interests being hindered (i.e. a relaxed shoot). The exposure would not have to be timed for when no one was walking on the floor, creating vibrations for both the camera and the hanging ornaments. And, no one would care that the lights were off.
 
After sitting at my desk all day, I needed to get some exercise, ideally in the form of a trail run, before it was dark. A late start on that task meant that an increased pace was necessary. Despite a blown out sock along the way (requiring a stop and reversal to prevent a hot spot from becoming a blister), I still managed to complete my tough 3k course in near record (for me) pace. Phew. there was just enough time to cleanse the scene and set up the camera prior to the ideal shooting time.
 
Experience taught that when the outdoor ambient light was ideally balanced with the indoor light, an ISO 100 exposure of 30 seconds at f/16 would be ideal. Why f/16? Do you see the stars on the candles sitting on the windows? Every light on the tree also has a similar-but-smaller star. You need a narrow aperture to make those happen. Also note that a wide max aperture lens often creates the biggest stars and the RF 28-70's stars are awesome.
 
While f/22 will create even larger stars, the strong softness caused by diffraction at this setting is hard to accept. While some diffraction effects are visible at f/16, this seems to be an optimal choice for balance between star size and sharpness. Using a +1 sharpness setting is a good compromise for using f/16 over the sharper f/11 setting. Nice is that the deep f/16 depth of field makes it easy to keep everything in the image sharp.
 
Scene prep involved moving a couple of items (couch, ottoman, ...) out of the way and smoothing the carpet. As I began setting up the camera, my oldest daughter called (from the shopping excursion) to ask questions about a Christmas gift she was putting together for her husband. I of course wanted to help her, but ... the light was fading (so much for the relaxed shoot). Her questions were answered just in time to finalize the setup and begin shooting. It is difficult to visualize when the perfect blue hour light balance is achieved, so I usually opt to shoot through the period of time that contains the ideal balance. Then, during post processing, there is again a struggle to decide which time was best because subsequent images appear quite similar.
 
When there was no more blue left in the windows, I knew that additional images were not going to look any different than those already captured (without choosing a new perspective) and I went to find warmer clothes (there had been no time to change out of my running clothes prior to the shoot).
 
Amazingly, the girls opted for a tree that I selected this year! They did a great job decorating the tree (as always) and they like the results of my final job, the formal tree picture. That is ... my final job until I get to clean up the results of the Christmas morning package destruction (and later take the tree out).
 
That is probably more than you wanted to know about this Christmas tree, but ... from my family to yours, we wish you a very warm Merry Christmas! And, I wish you many memory cards full of memories from the day!
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
 
Note that you are going to be hearing more about this tripod. I'm impressed.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
28mm  f/16.0  30s
ISO 100
4480 x 6720px
Post Date: 12/25/2018 8:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
B&H has the Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Lens for Canon in stock with free expedited shipping.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • EF-Mount Lens/Full-Frame Format
  • Aperture Range: f/2.8 to f/22
  • Nine FLD Elements, One SLD Element
  • Super Multi-Layer Coating
  • Hyper Sonic AF Motor
  • Intelligent OS Image Stabilization
  • Removable Arca-Type Tripod Foot
  • Dust- and Moisture-Sealed Construction
  • Rounded 11-Blade Diaphragm
  • Compatible with Sigma Teleconverters
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/25/2018 8:10:08 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, December 24, 2018
Those wanting an entry-level, yet feature rich DSLR will likely be considering the Canon EOS 77D and Canon EOS Rebel T7i / 800D. And while the two bodies appear (and, in fact, are) very similar, there are a few differences that may tip the decision-making scales in one direction or the other. So, let's take a closer look at these DSLRs to see how they stack up against one another, beginning with their similarities.
 
Canon EOS 77D and EOS Rebel T7i / 800D Shared Primary Features
 
  • Sensor: 24.2 MP Dual Pixel CMOS AF 1.6x (crop) APS-C
  • Processor: DIGIC 7
  • Autofocus System: 45 cross-type AF points, 27 f/8 points
  • AF Working Range: EV -3 - 18
  • Metering Sensor: 7560-pixel RGB+IR, 63 segments
  • Metering Range: EV 1 – 20
  • Exposure Compensation: +/-5 EV in 1/3 or 1/2 stop increment
  • Auto Exposure Bracketing: 2, 3, 5 or 7 Shots +/-3 EV 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments
  • ISO: Auto (100 - 25600), 100 - 25600 (H1: 51200)
  • Shutter Speed: 30 - 1/4000 sec
  • Continuous Shooting: max. 6 fps for 27 RAW
  • Video: up to FHD 1920 x 1080 at 60p
  • Identical White Balance Settings
  • Viewfinder: Pentamirror, 95% coverage, 0.82x magnification
  • LCD: Vari-angle touchscreen 7.7 cm (3.0") 3:2 Clear View II TFT, approx. 1040 K sRGB dots
  • Built-in Flash: 13.1m guide number, up to 17mm
  • X-Sync: 1/200 sec
  • Identical Shooting Modes
  • Identical Picture Styles
  • Built-in Wi-Fi, NFC and Low-Energy Bluetooth
  • USB 2.0, HDMI micro, 3.5mm external microphone port
  • Single Secure Digital (SD, UHS-I) Memory Card Slot
  • Battery Life: 820 shots via an LP-E17 battery
  • Body Materials: aluminum alloy and polycarbonate resin with glass fiber
  • Size: 5.16 x 3.93 x 3.00" (131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2mm)
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS 77D
 
  • Top LCD Data Panel
  • Multi-function Lock Switch
  • Auto Display-Off Sensor by the viewfinder
  • AF On button
  • Rear Control Dial vs. Cross Keys
Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS Rebel T7i / 800D
 
  • Lower cost
Who should opt for the Canon EOS 77D?
 
Few camera comparisons are as simple as this one. If the features listed in the Primary Advantages of the Canon EOS 77D section are worth its incremental cost over the Canon EOS Rebel T7i, then the decision is easy – get the 77D. The top LCD panel and AF On button (enabling back-button focus) specifically are features that many photographers will find especially beneficial, making the incremental investment over the Rebel T7i a worthwhile one.
 
Who should opt for the Canon EOS Rebel T7i?
 
If the EOS 77D's advantages listed above are of little value to you, or your budget is limited, then the Canon EOS Rebel T7i has gives you 95% of features of the 77D but at a lower cost. Like all top-end Rebels before it, you get a lot of value for your money.
 
Relevant Info
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/24/2018 1:11:32 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Are you a procrastinator? Was there someone on your gift list that you forgot to get a gift for? Thankfully, there's still time to rectify the situation.
 
Purchasing a gift card from B&H or Adorama can ensure your gift recipient gets exactly what they want while your e-gift gets delivered before the big day.
Post Date: 12/24/2018 10:25:19 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From PiXimperfect:
 
Control the Light with the Amazing "Horizontal Curve" Technique in Photoshop! Discover the most natural way to adjust the brightness of any area without disturbing the colors, using a simple straight Curve.
 
In this tutorial, we will use a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer and combine with a Curves adjustment layer to create a "Light Map" that would allow us to control the amount of light all throughout the image.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Post Date: 12/24/2018 8:23:42 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, December 21, 2018
Image quality test results have been added to the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L USM Lens Review page.
 
You ... want this lens under your Christmas tree.
 
The Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L USM Lens is in stock at B&H | Amazon | Adorama | WEX.
 
Rent the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L USM Lens from Lensrentals.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/21/2018 8:24:16 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
In response to a tilt-shift lens question, Canon USA Technical Advisor Rudy Winston provided a detailed response that we though was worth sharing with you.
 
Canon TS-E Tilt-Shift Lens General Shooting Procedure
 
While there's no one "official" way to work with the TS-E lenses (I'm sure you'll find some diversity of opinion on what different users feel is best), the following is what works best in my experience. Keep in mind there's no "one-touch" way to set the lens up unless you've recorded previous settings and are shooting the same subject subsequently, at the same camera position, subject distance, and so on. Otherwise, there's a bit of trial-and-error, especially if you're trying to adjust the zone of sharpness (notice I avoided saying "depth of field," as that technically doesn't change; you're altering the plane of sharpest focus via the tilt operation).
 
THE BASIC OPERATIONS
 
It is important to be sure in one's mind what the two different possible adjustments – Shift and Tilt – do, and why you might want to apply one or the other. There are certainly many instances where just one will provide the look you want in finished images, so don't assume every shot will need a combination of both (of course, experimentation can be great fun).
 
A couple of other points:
 
I *always* recommend starting with both tilt and shift zero'ed out, before you begin to work with adjustments.
 
Metering with DSLRs: You MUST perform any in-camera metering with a TS-E lens at the zero Shift and Tilt positions. On any of the cameras with an optical viewfinder, you will get exposure errors or deviations if you meter daylight or E-TTL flash with a TS-E lens that's not at its zero adjust positions. Note that this is far less of a problem with the mirrorless cameras, since they're metering directly off the image sensor, and the light doesn't have to get reflected upward by a DSLR mirror, and then get scattered by a focus screen before it's read by a metering sensor in the prism area, near the viewfinder eyepiece. Bottom line, do any metering (manual mode, of course, is ideal for this, since nothing will change if you begin to adjust the TS-E lens), before you start tilting and/or shifting, and you should be in a good place to begin taking actual shots... don't freak out if you do need to tweak exposures, after a couple of quick test shots, to nail it down the way you want. Parenthetically, if you're using a separate hand-held meter (not the one built-in to the camera body), you can normally set the camera to whatever the meter suggests, whether you've engaged tilt and/or shift or not, as typically a hand-held meter will be pretty close to optimum exposure for ambient light.
 
Shift function
 
Shifting the lens up, down, left or right is primary for perspective control – the obvious example is keeping vertical lines on a building or product (like a cereal box) straight, and avoiding the "pyramid" effect of converging vertical lines. It can sometimes also be useful for literally shifting the subject in the frame, removing the image of photographer & camera if shooting into a wall with small mirrors (this won't work for an entire mirrored wall, of course!), and so on.
 
Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II Lens Shift Example Cabin

Tilt function
 
Tilting the lens, so that the front section is no longer perfectly parallel with the image sensor/film plane, changes the plane of what is in sharp focus. Shooting with a lens from an angle (rather than straight into a subject, like a wide-angle shot of a car taken from around the front fender/wheel well), it's possible to focus on the near part of the subject, then tilt the lens so that the front section is closer to being parallel to the whole length of our hypothetical car (or any other subject), and you can get sharpness to run from the near area focused upon, down the length of the subject. To be clear, tilting has **nothing** to do with the architectural photography need to keep vertical lines straight; that's SHIFTING alone. Of course, you CAN combine tilt and shift in the same image... just be clear up-front about the role of each, or you'll spend a long time trying to dial-in an optimum setting.
 
Canon TS-E 50mm f/2.8L Macro Paddy Field Tilted at f 2.8

Shooting Aperture
 
Anything you want. If you apply tilt correctly, you won't require tiny f-stops like f/22 just to hope to get an entire subject sharp. In some cases, even a wide-open aperture can get the job done, which might never be possible with a conventional lens.
 
Tripod Use
 
Tripod use is definitely preferred where possible, since it keeps everything anchored and lets you concentrate on composing and working the lens's controls... though it *is* possible to do this hand-held. However, it's nowhere near as smooth an experience, and you can expect your arms to get tired after a while at the controls.
 
Release Knobs for Shift & Tilt
 
180 degrees from the actual adjustment knobs for each movement are locking knobs, slightly smaller in diameter. Be sure to UNLOCK each before trying to adjust shift or tilt, and then snug it back down once you've arrived at a desired setting to keep it from any inadvertent movement. This is especially important for SHIFT, since if you apply it vertically, the weight of the front section of the lens can sometimes allow it to drop downward slowly, if it's left unlocked after you've adjusted it.
 
Home Position and Rotating the Lens as Needed
 
By default, whether you've decided to apply shift/tilt or have everything zero'ed out, there's still a basic position from which you can apply your tilts and shifts. Mount the lens on the camera when it's all correctly oriented to the default settings, and you'll see the name plate at the TOP of the lens, when it's mounted and secured to the camera. AT THIS POSITION, any tilt movements (with most of the TS-E lenses, anyway) will be tilting the lens *left or right;* the larger Tilt knob will be facing upward and any shifting at the same default setting will move the lens up and down. This means the direction of each is at 90 degrees from the other movement, which is NORMAL operation for Canon TS-E lenses.
 
You're not locked-in to this. The lens can rotate, without loosening it from the camera. The 2nd generation lenses (see below) have TWO rotation points. However, the one closest to the camera body is definitely the primary one. It'll allow you to rotate the lens up to 90 degrees left or right. Example: in the standard position, the Shift is up and down. Say you wanted to shift side-to-side, for whatever reason. Ninety degrees to the right (think the 3 o'clock position, with the camera aimed at a subject, and in horizontal orientation) is a small, projecting tab, just inside the camera grip when the lens is correctly mounted. Press this release tab toward the camera body, and virtually the entire lens can be rotated in 30-degree increments, to the left or right. Move it 90 degrees, and your Shift now moves side-to-side (the Tilt moved as well, now tilting upward or downward).
 
In most real-life situations, you can rotate via this rear-most tab and move the desired adjustment to where you want it; much of the time, realistically, you won't be applying shift and tilt simultaneously. So just rotate the lens so your Shift *or* Tilt is where you need it.
 
Rotating Using the Forward-mounted Control
 
About 1/2 inch or so in front of the little, 3 o'clock projecting metal tab is another, very similar tab. THIS ONE allows you to rotate JUST the front section of the lens, while the rear section stays put. The primary purpose here is if you needed to apply both shift and tilt, and needed to change the normally standard orientation where tilt and shift are at 90 degrees from each other. However, DON'T use this rotation point to simply rotate the front section, if all you want is to change the tilt orientation... if you only want to change the direction of tilt, use the rear tab and rotation point to arrange the tilt where you want. There's a technical reason for not reaching for this forward rotation point if you can avoid it.
 
As I said, first-generation Canon TS-E lenses didn't have this forward mounted rotation capability... there is only one way to temporarily unlock and rotate the older TS-E lenses. Here are the lenses... check the lens naming at the front of the lens to determine which one you have.
 
First-gen TS-E lenses:
 
2nd-gen (current) TS-E lenses:
 
Shooting with the Canon TS-E Lenses
 
Example 1: Correcting converging vertical lines with SHIFT. I'll assume the camera is tripod-mounted, although again, you can do this hand-held if you can endure the hassle.
 
a. Keep the Camera Level – This is the most important part of being able to correct for converging lines, regardless of the lens you're using. Any upward angling of the entire camera, to "get the whole subject in," is going to make it impossible to correct for convergence... this is why buildings shot with conventional wide-angle lenses look like they're falling backward. It's perfectly normal not to get the entire subject in the frame at this stage.
 
Here's a wide-angle example of a typical building, with the camera aimed upward. The vertical lines converge inward, making the subject look a bit like a pyramid, or like it's falling over backward.
 
Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II Lens Home Example Pointed Up

b. Aim the camera straight ahead, not tilted up. Obviously, you now can't see the entire subject, but that's the role of the Shift function. What you WILL notice is that now, with the camera level, the vertical sides of the subject are indeed parallel, and not tilting inward. This is your starting point!
 
Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II Lens Home Example Straight Ahead Level

c. Now, start shifting the lens upward, to include more of the subject.
 
Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II Lens Home Example Shift Up 1

Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II Lens Home Example Shift Up 2

Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II Lens Home Example Shift Up 3

Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II Lens Home Example Shift Up 4

d. When the entire building (or cereal box, or whatever) is positioned where you want, lock the shift in-place, and begin shooting! You're done! Of course, if you move the camera, or go to a new subject, you'll likely need to use the Shift again to compose and align things as you want.
 
Example 2: Tilting to keep a subject sharp, as it recedes into the distance. Normally, this would require stopping-down to your minimum aperture, and hoping you have enough depth-of-field to cover you, front to back. TS-E lenses offer another alternative, and sometimes, you can even pull this off at the lens's widest aperture. Regardless, though, you'll find a lot less need to shoot at f/16, f/22 and so on!
 
a. Compose the scene as you desire, horizontal or vertical. We'll use a horizontal example here. b. **Focus on the NEAREST part of the subject or scene you want in sharp focus.** Of course, the background will be out of focus.
 
In this example, we've got a receding fence, drifting out of focus. Sharpest focus deliberately placed at nearest point we want in-focus; in this case, the first-generation TS-E 90mm f/2.8 lens was used wide-open, at f/2.8 throughout. No Tilt/Shift movements applied, yet.
 
Canon TS-E 90mm f/2.8 Lens Fence Example No Tilt Nearest Focus

c. Now, start to tilt the lens so that the front section starts to move in a direction closer to parallel to the subject you want to keep sharp. In this case, that meant the tilt section was moved so that (viewed from above) the front of the lens now tilts to the left.
 
IMPORTANT: As you start to tilt the lens, you'll see two things. The farthest part of the subject (fence in this case) will become progressively sharper. However, the front portion you just focused upon in step a will begin to drift a bit out of focus. Here's the key element to using tilt – you want to tilt until the degree of DE-FOCUS you see, front to back, is essentially constant. In other words, as you tilt, nothing in the fence or whatever the subject is will appear tack-sharp. What you want is to get the tilting so that the entire subject, front-to-back, appears about the same degree out of focus (it won't be radically out, but obviously just not tack-sharp, even at the point you focused on a moment before). This is absolutely normal.
 
d. Once you get the tilt so the entire subject looks pretty much the same, in terms of the degree of out-of-focus you see, you've got the tilt close to right-on. NOW, RE-FOCUS THE LENS TO GET THAT FRONT POINT SHARP AGAIN. If the amount of tilt was correct, the entire subject will now appear sharp. Again, if you examine the picture immediately below, keep in mind this was taken at f/2.8 with a 90mm telephoto lens.
 
Canon TS-E 90mm f/2.8 Lens  Fence Example After Tilt and Refocusing

A mistake many users make at first is tilting TOO MUCH, especially with relatively distant subjects. Do it in little increments, slowly, until you begin to get comfortable with the process. And, in general, the closer a subject is to the camera, the more you'll typically need to tilt the lens. This is something many users have to play with for a while, to get the hang of watching that entire scene/subject drift out of focus as they tilt, and stopping when the amount of de-focus is about the same, front to back. It's at that point, if done properly, that you've got the right amount of tilt dialed-in.
 
Thanks go out to Rudy Winston for providing this information. Images used in this article were provided by Mr Winston.
 
Read our Tilt-Shift lens reviews to find the right model for your needs:
 
Post Date: 12/21/2018 8:10:52 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, December 20, 2018

 
From the Adorama YouTube Channel:
 
If you're looking for a portrait project that's a little different and captures a bit of the festive season then this simple fine art shoot by photographer Gavin Hoey is for you.
 
Download Gavin's Festive Stars background from here.
 
After Gavin has given an overview on how he shot and edited the background he moves on to the portrait shoot, lighting the model to match the mood of the background.
 
Finally Gavin takes you into Photoshop to make a simple composite of the portrait and background stars.
 
Related Products
 
Post Date: 12/20/2018 3:11:04 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Eurasian magpies are common in many locations, but not where I live. Thus, they are more interesting to me than others. Especially interesting is that they are extremely intelligent (relative to animals in general). That these birds' loud calls can become annoying surely leads to local disinterest, but with their great colors and shape, it is hard to argue that magpies do not look amazing.
 
Magpies are not a subject I have set out to specifically target with a camera, but I will take advantage of incidental encounters. When one landed in a tree in front of me as I was chasing elk in Rocky Mountain National Park, I went into opportunistic mode. I had the right lens in hand and all I had to do was adjust the monopod height, direct the camera at the bird, focus on the eye and press the shutter release.
 
I of course pressed the shutter release many times in the short period of time the bird cooperated with me. Why did I select this particular image to share? Here are some reasons:
 
First, I like the head angle, turned slightly toward me with some sky reflecting in the eye to add life to the subject.
 
I also like the body angle. While the bird may be turned very slightly away and that is not usually my favorite angle, in this case, that angle allowed the iridescent feathers on the wing to show their colors prominently. The tail was angled downward enough to fit in the frame (that can be an issue when photographing magpies) and with a slight toward-the-camera angle, the iridescent tail feathers also showed their colors.
 
Aspects I like that were common to this set of images, in addition to the beauty of the magpie, include:
 
I was able to get to eye level with the bird (by quickly adjusting the monopod).
 
The background was very distant and became completely blurred with a close subject photographed at 600mm f/4. With all details in the background eliminated, the bird stands out prominently.
 
I also like that the lighting was very soft with a touch of rim lighting happening. Looking closely at the catchlight in the eye tells me this day was partly cloudy and that clouds were blocking the sun during this exposure.
 
Unless flying, birds are on something – a branch, sand, rock, water, etc. In this case, that something was a dead tree limb. That this particular limb did not distract from the bird and even had a little character was a positive aspect.
 
While Rocky Mountain National Park is an awesome location for elk photography, it offers much more. Including magpies.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr.
Post Date: 12/20/2018 11:33:50 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
From Tamron:
 
December 20, 2018, Saitama, Japan - Tamron Co., Ltd. announces a new firmware update for the Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 (Model A022) for compatibility with the Canon EOS R and Mount Adapter EF-EOS R. The new F/W version makes the model compatible with Canon "EOS R" and Canon "Mount Adapter EF-EOS R" for general operations[1].
 
The lens firmware can be updated with the separately sold TAP-in Console. Customers may also contact Tamron USA's service department at 1-800-827-8880, option 1 for information on sending in the lens for the update.
 
Compatible Tamron Lenses as of 12/20/18[2]
 
  • SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A041) for Canon
  • SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A032) for Canon
  • SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A025) for Canon
  • SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 (Model A022) for Canon
  • SP 35mm F/1.8 Di VC USD (Model F012) for Canon
  • SP 45mm F/1.8 Di VC USD (Model F013) for Canon
  • SP 85mm F/1.8 Di VC USD (Model F016) for Canon
  • SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD 1:1 MACRO (Model F017) for Canon
  • 17-35mm F/2.8-4 Di OSD (Model A037) for Canon
  • 70-210mm F/4 Di VC USD (Model A034) for Canon
[1] Functions used on DSLR cameras
[2] With the latest version of lens firmware
Post Date: 12/20/2018 8:54:12 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, December 19, 2018
Post Date: 12/19/2018 2:45:11 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Just posted: Really Right Stuff LCF-54 Foot Review.
 
After seven months of using the LCF-54, it has become a must-have accessory.
 
The Really Right Stuff LCF-54 Foot is in stock at B&H.
 
If you have a different lens with a tripod collar, check out the other Really Right Stuff replacement feet available. Wimberley and Kirk also make high quality replacement feet.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/19/2018 8:18:37 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, December 18, 2018
B&H has the Canon RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Lens in stock with free expedited shipping.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • RF-Mount Lens/Full-Frame Format
  • Aperture Range: f/4 to f/22
  • Super Spectra Coating
  • Nano USM AF System
  • Optical Image Stabilizer
  • Customizable Control Ring
  • Rounded 9-Blade Diaphragm
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/18/2018 7:16:53 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
LensRentals has posted a teardown of the Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS III USM Lens.
 
This is a very well designed lens that features exceptional build quality.
 
You can pick up your own Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS III USM Lens at B&H, Adorama, Wex and Henry's.
Post Date: 12/18/2018 6:08:46 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Nikon has posted a couple of tips for using N-Log recording on the Nikon Z 7 and Z 6.
 
In addition to the tips, you can also download the N-Log Specifications from Nikon.
 
Note that Nikon still can't decide whether or not the space belongs in their Z-series camera names. Even though Nikon's official stance is that the names should include a space, both versions of the camera model names are listed on the Technical Solutions page.
 
Nikon Technical Solutions Z 7 / Z 6 Screenshot

B&H carries the Nikon Z 7 and Z 6.
Post Date: 12/18/2018 8:05:26 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, December 17, 2018
B&H is offering free next day delivery on 1,000s of item through December 19. If you're needing (or wanting) one more gift under the Christmas tree before the big day arrives, then head to B&H before time runs out. They have a ton of items with holiday savings and an extended return period through February 1, 2019.
Category: B&H News
Post Date: 12/17/2018 2:33:11 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Keeping track of their memory cards just got a whole easier for you with our Secure Pixel Pocket Rockets. They are designed with zippered pockets for maximum security in holding multiple card sizes, such as six CF memory cards, or six XQD memory cards, or 12 SD memory cards, or multiple Micro SD memory cards.
 
In addition to the zippered closure, the Secure Pixel Pocket Rockets can be mounted on belts, or attached to clothing or bag with the removable lanyard. They feature a clear identification window.
 
Our existing memory card holders, the Pixel Pocket Rocket, Pee Wee Pixel Pocket Rocket, and the SD Pocket Rocket, are now available in black. The additional color presents an optional organizational strategy: keep empty cards in one color and used in another. They all have been updated to account for modern media sizes.
 
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
 
Folded: 5.2” W x 2.8” H x 0.8” D (13.3 x 7 x 2 cm)
Weight (with lanyard): 0.2 lbs. (0.1 kg)
 
MATERIALS
 
Exterior: All fabric exterior treated with a durable water-resistant coating while fabric underside is coated with polyurethane for superior water resistance, 250D shadow ripstop nylon, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
Interior: 210D silver-toned nylon lining, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
 
Think Tank Photo has the new Secure Pixel Pocket Rockets in stock.
Post Date: 12/17/2018 2:26:54 PM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
In this episode of Two Minute Tips (Ep 146), David Bergman shows you how to use negative fill to add drama to your images.
 
Products Used
 
Post Date: 12/17/2018 12:24:37 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
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