Canon, Nikon and Sony News for Feb 2017 (Page 8) Report News & Deals  ►

 Wednesday, February 8, 2017
Live Again: You can get a Canon EOS-1D C with 4K Canon Log recording for less than the price of an EOS-1D X.
 
Use coupon code BHWPPI17 at B&H to get the Canon EOS-1D C Camera for $3,999.00 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $7,999.00.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 4K 4096x2160 8-Bit 4:2:2 Cinematic Video
  • Canon Log with 12 Stops of Dynamic Range
  • Continuous Recording, No 29:59 Min Limit
  • Full HD 1080p Recording at up to 60fps
  • 18.1MP CMOS Sensor
  • Dual CF Card Recording Media
  • Dual DIGIC 5+ Image Processors
  • 3.2" LCD Screen
  • 61-Point High Density Auto Focus
  • EF Lens Mount; Magnesium Alloy Body
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 2/8/2017 7:08:21 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
For a limited time, use coupon code BHWPPI17 at B&H to save 5% on the following DJI products:
 
Post Date: 2/8/2017 7:00:25 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Adorama has the X-Rite ColorMunki (Pink Edition) available for $99.99. Regularly $179.00.
 
Adorama also has the X-rite ColorMunki with ColorChecker Passport (Pink Edition) reduced from $258.99 to $158.99.
Post Date: 2/8/2017 6:39:28 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Through midnight tonight Eastern Time, B&H has the Rokinon 24mm T1.5 Cine ED AS IF UMC Lens for Canon available for $449.00 with free shipping. Regularly $649.00.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Canon EF Mount Lens
  • Aperture Range: T1.5 to T22
  • Four ED and Two Aspherical Elements
  • UMC Coating
  • Geared Focus and Aperture Control Rings
  • De-Clicked Aperture Ring
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 2/8/2017 5:06:21 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, February 7, 2017
Through February 12, use coupon code BHWPPI17 at B&H to get $50.00 Off the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art and 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lenses.
Post Date: 2/7/2017 2:10:58 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Sigma Corporation of America recently clarified its Gray Market Service Policy which went into effect January 1, 2017. In it, Sigma USA warns that not only will it refuse to repair gray market items for free under warranty, but that it will charge a $250.00 service fee on top of the parts and labor costs for repairing gray market goods. See below for Sigma USA's new official Gray Market Service Policy (we bolded part of the last sentence for emphasis).
 
From Sigma:
Gray Market
As of January 1, 2017, any product that is not imported by the Sigma Corporation of America or purchased from an unauthorized Sigma USA Dealer will not be serviced under warranty regardless of the service required. The Sigma Corporation of America Service department will service these products for a minimum $250 charge in addition to the required parts and labor charges at the owner's expense.
B&H, Amazon and Adorama are all authorized Sigma retailers.
Category: Sigma News
Post Date: 2/7/2017 10:58:56 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Through midnight tonight Eastern Time, B&H has the Senal MC24-ES Professional Condenser Shotgun Microphone available for $99.95 with free shipping. Regularly $209.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • For Film, Broadcast & Video Production
  • Hypercardioid Polar Pattern
  • Tailored for Rich Natural-Sounding Vocal
  • Full Range Frequency Response
  • Superb Side and Rear Signal Rejection
  • Selectable High-Pass Filter
  • 7.1" Long, Compact and Lightweight
  • Operates on 48V Phantom Power
  • Durable Brass Construction
  • Rubberized Low Reflection Matte Coating
Post Date: 2/7/2017 10:36:43 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Sony Europe:
 
New Full-frame 85mm F1.8 Mid-telephoto prime lens and Compact Radio-Controlled Flash also announced
 
Sony today introduced two new lenses for their popular line of E-mount interchangeable lens cameras.
 
Sony’s new lenses include one of their flagship G Master Series – an FE 100mm F2.8[i] STF GM OSS mid- telephoto prime lens (model SEL100F28GM) built to deliver breath taking bokeh with a unique STF (Smooth Trans Focus) design, and a new compact, lightweight FE 85mm F1.8 mid-telephoto prime lens (model SEL85F18) that is a welcome addition to the bag of any hobbyist or enthusiast photographer looking to create amazing portraits.
 
Sony also introduced a new powerful, compact flash (model HVL-F45RM) with radio-controlled wireless communication that is ideal for professional shooting with Sony’s line-up of a7 full-frame cameras.
 
FE 100mm F2.8 STF GM OSS Telephoto Prime Lens
 
A specially designed mid-telephoto, full-frame prime lens, the new 100mm STF is built to produce truly unique, magnificent and beautiful bokeh while maintaining the exceptional standard of resolution that is showcased throughout Sony’s entire line-up of flagship G Master series lenses, making it a powerful photographic tool for any portrait, fashion, nature or wedding photographer.
 
These impressive defocus capabilities are made possible by the lens’ advanced optical structure, as it features a newly designed 11-bladed aperture and a unique optical apodization lens element. Similar to a neutral density filter that increases in density towards the edges, the apodization element creates beautiful transitions of in-focus to out-of-focus areas within an image, making for exceptionally soft, smooth bokeh that adds depth and dimensionality. This allows the subjects to stand out against beautifully defocused elements in both the foreground and background, producing an image that is naturally pleasing to the eye. The design of the lens also ensures that vignetting is kept to an absolute minimum, ensuring optimum image quality.
 
Additionally, the new 100mm lens supports both contrast AF and focal-plane phase detection AF[ii], and has a high-precision, quiet direct drive SSM (Super Sonic Motor) system that ensures exceptionally fast and accurate AF performance. The SEL100F28GM also offers up to 0.25x close-up capabilities with a built-in macro switching ring, built-in Optical SteadyShot image stabilisation, a customisable focus hold button, AF/MF switch, aperture ring and is also dust and moisture resistant.[iii]
 
FE 85mm F1.8 Telephoto Prime Lens
 
The new SEL85F18 mid-telephoto prime lens offers an extremely versatile, lightweight and compact telephoto prime lens solution for a variety of Sony camera owners ranging from working professionals to emerging enthusiasts that have stepped up to an APS-C or full-frame camera for the first time. With its wide F1.8 aperture, it can produce impressive, exceptionally sharp portraits with soft background defocus that take advantage of its 85mm focal length and wide F1.8 maximum aperture.
 
The new prime lens features a 9-bladed circular aperture mechanism that ensures smooth, natural looking bokeh, and a double linear motor system to allow for fast, precise and quiet focusing. It also has a focus hold button that can be customised and assigned together with functions in the camera body like the popular Eye-AF feature. There is a smooth, responsive focus ring and AF/MF switch and the lens is also dust and moisture resistant.iii
 
New Compact Radio-controlled Flash
 
Sony’s new HVL-F45RM flash enhances the radio-controlled lighting system capabilities of their growing system, offering a compact professional shooting solution when combined with the currently available wireless remote controller FA-WRC1M and receiver FA-WRR1.
 
The new flash, which is designed to complement the compact bodies of Sony’s E-mount camera line-up including full-frame a7 models, produces a maximum lighting output as expansive as GN45[iv]. This ensures sufficient illumination even when shooting with bounce lighting or high-speed-sync (HSS) flash. The radio capabilities of the HVL-F45RM allow it to be used as a transmitter or a receiver at up to 30m (approx. 98 feet[v]), making it an ideal fit for creative lighting with multiple flashes. Additionally, unlike optical flash systems, radio-control flashes do not require a direct line-of-sight between components to function properly, while also minimising any impact that bright sunlight has on signal transmission and control.
 
The HVL-F45RM flash has an impressive battery life of up to 210 bursts, and can tilt up to 150o vertically, a complete 360o horizontally and up to 8o downward to maximise versatility. Usability has been maximised with a new large, bright and highly visible LCD display, an LED light, dust and moisture resistant design3 and a revamped menu system that mimics those of Sony’s newest camera systems.
 
Pricing and Availability
 
The new lenses and flashwill start shipping in March 2017. The SEL100F28GM will be priced at approximately €2,000, the SEL85F18 will be priced at approximately €650 and the HVL-F45RM will be priced at approximately €480.
 
B&H will carry the Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF G Master, FE 85mm F1.8 & HVL-F45RM Flash.
Posted to: Sony News
Post Date: 2/7/2017 10:31:25 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Canon USA:
 
MELVILLE, N.Y., February 7, 2017 – On February 5th, top sports photographers from across the country gathered in Houston to cover the Big Game between the teams from New England and Atlanta. With an estimated 75 percent* of the photographers in the Houston stadium using Canon EOS DSLR cameras and EF lenses, Canon’s iconic white lenses filled the sidelines from the opening kickoff to the final whistle. In addition to the EOS DSLR cameras and EF lenses on the sidelines, Canon’s line of HD broadcast lenses were also used extensively to help deliver the game to more than 110 million television viewers.
 
“It’s an honor to see yet another major sporting event where the country’s most talented and acclaimed sports photographers captured exciting moments with Canon equipment. These images will be seen by millions of people around the world and will forever be etched in sports history. We understand there are many equipment options for professional photographers and Canon is honored to serve these professionals and provide assurances that both our products and support live up to the requirements and expectations of our devoted customers,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, president and COO, Canon U.S.A., Inc.
 
A full complement of friendly and knowledgeable staff from the Canon Professional Services (CPS) team, a fixture at major sporting events throughout the year, were on site at the stadium for most of the week leading up to game day providing comprehensive equipment maintenance, extensive equipment loans and expert technical support to the major photo agencies and individual professional (or media) photographers covering the game.
 
For veteran sports photographer and Canon Explorer of Light Damian Strohmeyer, this was his 30th time covering the big game as a professional, and he was well stocked with Canon cameras and lenses. "Leading up to the game, I always make sure to meet with the Canon Professional Services team to run through my settings and firmware, and ensure that my gear is as ready for the big game as the players are," Strohmeyer said. "During the game, there's so much action that you can't be worried about how your equipment will perform. Depending on where the play is, I need to stay prepared for anything that may happen, with no time to switch lenses. For this reason, I used three EOS-1D X Mark II cameras, equipped with EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM, EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM, and EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM lenses. After the game, I switched to an EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM wide angle lens for post-game reaction shots. Everything performed fabulously, and my images came out looking great!"
 
Canon Professional Services will be proudly attending to professional photographers at over 30 events this year including major sporting, auto racing, Hollywood, and political events throughout the year.
 
* Based on Canon U.S.A., Inc., survey and data, as of February 6, 2017.
Posted to: Canon News
Category: Canon USA News
Post Date: 2/7/2017 10:14:02 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
For a limited time, B&H has the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art (review) available with a $100.00 instant savings.
 
For what it's worth, this is one of my favorite lenses and one that I reach for quite often. [Sean]
Post Date: 2/7/2017 9:37:57 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Want to add some creative flair to your newborn photo sessions?
 
B&H has Custom Props Newborn Photography Props on sale for 15% off. Items include wraps, diaper covers, crowns and faux fur fabrics.
Post Date: 2/7/2017 9:16:28 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the B&H YouTube Channel:
 
Think you know your Nikon camera? You might reconsider after spending an afternoon with Nikon Technical Sales Representative, Alex Podstawski. Join Alex as he shares some of his favorite tips and tricks for making digital images better.
 
If you own any of Nikon’s DSLRs, than this seminar is made just for you! During this informative seminar, you'll discover things about your Nikon DSLR that will help you take your picture creation to a whole new level.
 
B&H carries Nikon cameras and lenses.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 2/7/2017 9:13:02 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Is an electronic viewfinder (EVF) better than an optical viewfinder (OVF)? Or even an acceptable alternative? Though some DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) cameras have EVFs, a major consideration when selecting between an MILC (Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera) and a conventional DSLR is that the MILC will not have an optical viewfinder (OVF). As more MILCs become available and as this camera type gains in popularity, these questions are becoming more important ones for this site's audience to answer.
 
With no mirror or optical viewfinder, MILCs utilize data coming off of the imaging sensor to display the TTL (Through the Lens) view on an LCD. That LCD panel can be on the back of the camera or in a viewfinder where it is typically referred to as an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder). This is not a new technology, but one that has been utilized by many non-MILC digital cameras, practically since digital cameras existed.
 
Relevant to this site's audience is the replacement of the traditional DSLR OVF with an EVF. Safe to say is that all high-grade cameras produced today have an LCD that can be used for mirror-up, live view of an image that is about to be captured. Therefore, the benefits of an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder) relate to being able to see an LCD with the camera placed at one's eye. Making the difference less black and white is that LCD viewfinders/shades/loupes, such as those by Hoodman, are available for use on the rear LCD, effectively giving all digital cameras an "EVF".
 
To get started with the comparisons, let's look at:
 
The Advantages of All Live View LCD Displays Over Optical Viewfinders
 
A big advantage of an electronic viewfinder is the WYSIWYG (What You See is What You Get) image preview. Able to be included in the LCD image preview is the actual exposure brightness, optionally including a histogram and over/underexposure warnings. Also able to be included in the preview are the net results of other camera settings being applied, including white balance, contrast and saturation. This preview is usually able to show a 100% view of the composition vs. a slightly cropped view shown by many OVFs.
 
When shooting in a very dark environment, it becomes very difficult to compose an image using an optical viewfinder. By using an amplified signal from the sensor, an LCD viewfinder can present a much brighter image that greatly facilitates composition. A "dark environment" can include the use of a strong neutral density filter under even bright daylight conditions.
 
Under the extreme opposite lighting conditions, the LCD can offer protection to your eyes. At the extreme end of the brightness category, the sun poses a serious risk to eyesight. Eye damage can easily occur if looking at the sun through an OVF, especially with a telephoto focal length in use. An LCD's maximum brightness is not dangerous to the eye, even with the sun in the center of the frame. There is little risk to your eyes when viewing the sun in an LCD, but note that your camera may not fare as well.
 
An LCD does not need a viewfinder shutter or cover to prevent unwanted light from affecting the metering or exposure.
 
A mirror assembly is required for OVFs, but not for LCDs. Removing the mirror assembly has some advantages, including the cost of the assembly being eliminated (though EVFs also have a cost that must be factored back in). The mirror assembly has moving parts and moving parts may eventually require replacement (though the life of a DSLR mirror assembly is usually a very significant number of actuations).
 
The lack of mirror movement creates some additional benefits. First, a mirror rapidly flipping up and down makes noise and a camera operating without a mirror is considerably quieter. Mirror movement causing vibration during the exposure becomes a non-concern. Also, the mirror lockup function becomes obsolete. Without the rapid mirror movement, airflow in the mirror box is reduced, which may in turn reduce instances of dust adhering on the sensor. Take the lens off of an electronic first curtain shutter MILC (a common design) and the imaging sensor is right there, easily accessible for cleaning.
 
The lack of a mirror forces another primary differentiator between non-OVF vs. OVF cameras and that is, without a mirror, the imaging sensor must be used for all pre-shot calculations, including auto focus and auto exposure. While there are some disadvantages to the mirrorless design in these regards (primarily related to AF speed), those weaknesses are diminishing as technology moves forward. One advantage is that the LCD provides a much larger AF area coverage with (at least potentially) more AF points. Another is that, with focusing taking place precisely on the imaging sensor, AFMA (Auto Focus Microadjustment) is no longer needed and lens focus calibration becomes a non-issue.
 
With the LCD previewing the image about to be captured, precise focusing can be monitored, including focus peaking indication. Also, an enlarged view of a portion of the frame can be selected to verify focusing or to aid in precise manual focusing. With the tremendously detailed information the sensor makes available, technologies including face and smile detection can be implemented.
 
While intelligent optical viewfinders have shown great advances in recent years, complete with transparent LCD overlays, they don't come close to the capabilities of LCDs in terms of the information that can be shown. A high-resolution LCD panel with a huge palette of colors available provides designers great flexibility in creating a camera's graphical user interface and also in the customization capability of that interface.
 
Though a bigger advantage for true EVF cameras, LCD displays can provide an immediate display of a captured image precisely where the photographer is looking at time the image is captured (such as directly through the viewfinder). However, I must note that this review interrupts the capture of a subsequent image and that I now turn off the image review feature on the EVF cameras I'm using. Still, the press of a button brings the image review display up without the need to move the camera or look elsewhere.
 
While some manufacturers (including Canon and Nikon) contend that image stabilization technology works best in the lens vs. in-camera (and there is validity to this claim), inarguable is that the effects of in-camera image stabilization will not be seen in an optical viewfinder, leaving the view shaky.
 
Again, camera-back LCDs and EVFs (which also use an LCD) share the benefits just described.
 
Differences Between Primary LCDs and Viewfinders (Both EVFs and OVFs)
 
As mentioned, when it gets dark, LCD live view displays and EVFs are much easier to compose with than OVFs. However, in bright daylight, even the best rear LCDs become very difficult to see and I find it especially challenging to compose using the rear LCD under direct sunlight. In contrast, viewfinders make it easy to critically view the composition under even the brightest conditions, giving them a huge advantage over a rear LCD under bright daylight conditions.
 
I wear eyeglasses a good percentage of the time (and that percentage is increasing). If you do not need corrective optics now, you will – it is only a matter of time. I have reading/computer glasses and another set with a distance prescription for seeing longer distances. When out and about with a camera, I seldom have both sets of glasses with me and I often wear none. This means that the image on the camera's rear LCD, within arm's length, appears slightly fuzzy to me. Yes, bifocals and trifocals are options that would help with this issue, but ... I have not appreciated the limited views that these provide. Dioptric adjustments provided by viewfinders resolve this issue, permitting a clear view of what I'm about to photograph and review of what I already photographed.
 
Another key viewfinder advantage is that it provides additional stability for holding the camera steady. While it can also lead to AEB, the camera pressed against an eyebrow adds a significant third point of stability in addition to two hands. Also, this position allows both elbows to be tucked into the ribs, increasing stability even more.
 
A camera's primary LCD tends to collect fingerprints and other smudges at a rapid pace and these can interfere with visibility of the display, especially in bright light. A viewfinder, to the contrary, tends to stay clean. However, a viewfinder, with its inset glass, is harder to clean than a primary LCD that, especially if properly coated, easily wipes clean with a microfiber cloth.
 
Advantages of Electronic Viewfinders over Main LCDs
 
As mentioned, an accessory viewfinder/shade/loupe can turn a camera's rear LCD into the equivalent of an EVF. A downside is that LCD loupes are not nearly as well integrated into the camera design as EVFs are – built-in EVFs are considerably more compact and less intrusive. External loupes also get in the way of touch screen functionality.
 
Advantages of Eliminating the OVF
 
A primary attraction of MILCs is their smaller size and lighter weight. Eliminating the mirror box and OVF immediately reduce the footprint of a camera, permitting these design advantages.
 
Advantages of Optical Viewfinders
 
With resolution not limited by dots of pixels (that can appear to flicker as they change colors when framing is adjusted) and refresh rates not limited by an electronic display, huge advantages of an OVF include resolution and responsiveness. In addition to seemingly unlimited resolution and refresh rates happening at the speed of light, OVF dynamic range is limited only by our eyesight. An LCD has a limited dynamic range and may show blocked shadows and blown highlights. Though the dynamic range of the image captured via an OVF system will similarly be limited by the imaging sensor, seeing the full brightness range is different.
 
The EVF properties just discussed can leave the photographer feeling somewhat disconnected from the moment, akin to watching a movie of an event vs. seeing it in-person as an OVF provides the sense of.
 
While an LCD can make low light composition easier, a photographer's eye must constantly adjust between the bright display and dark ambient light levels. Generally speaking, the brightness seen through an OVF is similar to what is seen without the camera in use.
 
While removing the mirror assembly brings some advantages, the mirror provides a level of protection to the imaging sensor. Take the lens off of an OVF camera and it is the mirror that becomes exposed instead of the imaging sensor.
 
While not directly related to the viewfinder type, MILCs are very commonly given EVFs with reduced camera size and weight being two of the common design targets. Especially with the smaller MILCs, using large lenses and full-sized flashes can lead to a tail-wagging-the-dog scenario where the provided grip is inadequate or only marginally adequate to maintain control of the overall setup. OVF cameras are often larger, making larger lenses and flashes easier to control.
 
While on the size topic, If considering an MILC for size and weight reduction purposes, make sure that the MILC lenses you need do not make up for some of the camera footprint and weight difference. While most of these cameras indeed have a smaller footprint than their DSLR equivalents, the size of the lenses needs to be considered and these are not necessarily smaller. The smaller camera does not change optical properties and the image circle size required by the same-size sensor remains the same.
 
Though these cameras often utilize a short back-focus lens design and some lenses are indeed smaller, some of the smaller lenses also have narrower maximum apertures. MILCs may need an adapter to use the manufacturer's standard lenses (the Canon EOS M series for example). While an adaptor can tremendously extend the number of lenses a camera is compatible with, it is an extra part to buy, carry and use. And, it makes the camera (or each lens) effectively larger and heavier in use, with the EF to EOS-M adaptor adding a modest 1" (26mm) and 3.77 oz. (107g) respectively.
 
With the imaging sensor required to be powered up for an EVF to function and because an EVF's full-color LCD requires its own share of power, EVFs require more battery capacity for an equivalent number of photos to be captured. However, battery size, and with it, capacity is a typical sacrifice made by MILCs. As a result, cameras with EVFs often have considerably lower battery life ratings. A faster battery exhaustion rate greatly increases the chance that the battery will become fully drained just when the perfect image presents itself (one of Bryan's Laws of Photography).
 
Roughly figure an EVF system to require at least twice as many batteries as an OVF system. If you often carry a spare battery with your OVF camera, you should probably carry 3 or 4 with an EVF camera. Additional batteries add to the system cost, carrying extra batteries adds to the system weight and maintaining the charge of additional batteries requires maintenance and logistics – and probably at least a second charger as you can potentially drain batteries faster than you can charge them.
 
Do you ever look through your viewfinder with the camera powered off? Perhaps when setting up a tripod and composing a scene? Complete blackness is what you will see if doing so with an EVF camera.
 
If shooting action, I still want an OVF. While EVFs have made great strides in recent years, they have not yet equaled OVF systems in some important regards, especially in their ability to capturing a precise moment of action. As mentioned, EVF response rates are not light-speed and every microsecond counts when a precise moment in time needs to be captured. Advances in on-sensor AF capabilities have brought recently-produced EVF camera performance much closer to the traditional phase detection systems found in OVF cameras. But, traditional phase-detection AF systems still modestly outperform current on-sensor performance in the critical-for-action speed component.
 
Most OVF systems have a significantly shorter blackout time during the image capture and if following action, this is a critical factor. The difference at this time (Canon EOS M5 and Sony a7R II era) is significant enough that I find EVF cameras practically unusable for tracking/framing a moving subject even with image review turned off. I can keep a straight-on-approaching/leaving subject in the frame for a period of time with an EVF, but if they move to the side, my framing quickly falls apart.
 
Summary
 
So, back to the questions: Is an electronic viewfinder (EVF) better than an optical viewfinder (OVF) and is an EVF an acceptable alternative to an OVF?
 
The answer to both of those questions is yes or no. It depends. Both designs have advantages and disadvantages and how appropriate either type is for you depends on your personal needs.
 
As mentioned, using a shade/loupe/viewfinder on the rear LCD can provide the EVF features to most cameras and cameras with an OVF can then have the best of both features. Better still is the talk of a hybrid viewfinder being introduced. Such would feature the option of an OVF or an EVF selectable as desired. Transparent LCD overlays have been available in better DSLR models for years now, so the idea does not seem far-fetched.
 
What did I miss? Have any other thoughts in this regard? Please share these in the comments.
Post Date: 2/7/2017 8:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
B&H has the Transcend CFX650 256GB CFast 2.0 Flash Memory Card (review) available for $349.99 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $449.99.
 
For what it's worth, Bryan has been very impressed with this card's performance paired with the EOS-1D X Mark II.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 256GB Capacity
  • 510 MB/s Read Speed
  • 370 MB/s Write Speed
  • MLC NAND Flash Chips
  • Designed for 4K & Full HD Cinematography
  • Built-In Error Correcting Code (ECC)
  • RecoveRx Photo Recovery Software
B&H has the Tenba Discovery: Mini Photo/Laptop Messenger (Sage/Khaki) available for $39.95 with free shipping. Regularly $109.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Holds DSLR With 2-3 Lenses, Flash
  • Separate Rear Pocket for 13" Computer
  • Removable Photo Insert
  • Front Pockets for Accessories
  • Wide, Padded Removable Shoulder Strap
  • Water-Repellent Nylon Exterior
  • Waterproof Bottom Panel
  • Self-Healing Zippers
  • Trolley Sleeve / Mesh Pockets for Water
  • Includes Rain Cover
Post Date: 2/7/2017 5:11:20 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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