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 Thursday, February 2, 2017
Adobe is citing higher-than-expected currency fluctuations for its plan to raise Creative Cloud rates in the UK and Sweden starting March 6, 2017.
 
From Adobe UK:
Adobe and currency fluctuations
 
Currency exchange rates have fluctuated significantly over the last few years. Like many US-based global companies, Adobe is making pricing adjustments in a number of countries to offset fluctuations in foreign exchange rate. Starting on March 6, 2017, the price of Adobe products in the United Kingdom and Sweden will be increased. Existing customers will receive information about their subscription pricing directly from Adobe.
 
When do the product prices increase in the United Kingdom and Sweden?
 
The increased prices are effective starting on March 6, 2017.
 
I have an existing membership. Is my monthly fee going up?
 
If you have a month-to-month plan, you will see the price increase on your statement at the next billing date. If you have an annual plan, the new price goes into effect at the end of your annual term.
On the one hand, I hate to see a monthly rate increase for any service that I subscribe to. On the other hand, I can certainly understand how a company with such a global reach may have to periodically adjust prices based on drastic currency fluctuations. I only hope that these periodic adjustments will include price reductions if the exchange rate goes in the other direction. [Sean]
Category: Adobe News
Post Date: 2/2/2017 11:45:19 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Syrp:
 
Genie Firmware Version 2.8.0 Fixes
 
  • Fixed issue of the Genie occasionaly dropping off the connection screen in the Syrp Genie App during Pan Track or 3 Axis movements.
  • Improvements in distance accuracy for longer tracking movements.
Download: Syrp Genie Firmware Version 2.8.0
 
B&H carries the Syrp Genie Motion Control Time Lapse Device.
Category: Syrp News
Post Date: 2/2/2017 10:28:02 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the Polar Pro Hard Case for DJI Mavic Pro available with free expedited shipping.
Post Date: 2/2/2017 8:20:12 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Resolution and noise test results along with specifications have been added to the Sony a7R II Review page.
 
Creating perfect apples-to-apples comparisons between different systems is very difficult and I ask you to use careful discernment as you make such comparisons. In the Sony a7R II vs. Canon EOS 5Ds R noise comparison, I see more noise in the higher resolution camera (a higher pixel density sensor showing more pixel-level noise is expected), but the difference is slight and partially due to the Canon noise details being rendered slightly sharper (sharpening the noise).
 
I don't have under and overexposed examples available for the EOS 5Ds R in the noise comparison tool (at least not yet), but do have them for the EOS 5D Mark IV. In this case, the Canon has lower pixel density (and resolution) to its pixel-level noise advantage. With that difference in mind, the a7R II vs. 5D IV comparison shows the 5D IV results having slightly less noise and less grain to the noise when exposures are pushed 3 stops. Whether the less-grain difference is positive or not is a bit of a personal preference and the processing of the RAW images may come into play here.
 
Here is the Sony a7R II vs. Canon EOS 5Ds R resolution comparison. And, here is the Sony a7R II vs. Canon EOS 5D Mark IV resolution comparison.
 
If you missed the post earlier this week, the Sony a7R II Review page has a brief discussion on the Sony RAW converter and processing settings decision process.
 
B&H has the Sony a7R II with a $300.00 rebate. As I said before, to get a huge bargain, trade in any camera or lens (even something of very low value) and get an additional $480.00 off of this camera (in addition to the trade-in value) or a significant amount off of many other Sony products.
Post Date: 2/2/2017 7:59:07 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
B&H is now carrying Wine Country Camera Filter Holders and Filter Vaults.
 
Wine Country Camera Filter Holder Features
 
  • Filter Holder Rotates 360°
  • Holds 3 Filter Vaults & Polarizer Filter
  • Aluminum-Alloy, Rosewood Construction
  • Two Wine Country Camera Filter Vaults
  • For 100x100x2mm or 100x150x2mm Filters
  • Limit Stray Light, Protects Filter Edges
  • Keeps Filter Surfaces Flat
  • Circular Polarizer Rotates Independently
Post Date: 2/2/2017 6:24:46 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Wednesday, February 1, 2017

 
From the B&H YouTube Channel:
 
As many people know, our National Parks are seeing ever increasing numbers of visitors which means traffic jams, long waits, and huge crowds at the better known photo spots. The good news is that almost everyone disappears after the sunset fades. Chris and Lance are two of the five instructors that make up National Parks at Night, and they will show you how to make the most of your visit to any national park and experience them in ways that most people never do. National parks have some of the darkest skies in the country, which means they are filled with amazing views of the Milky Way.
 
Lance has been photographing at night for 30 years, and has almost 20 years experience teaching night photography, and Chris literally wrote the book on photographing national parks. Together they will share their experiences photographing the night sky in Parks like Acadia, Yosemite, Joshua Tree, Death Valley, Zion, and many others. They will also present general tips on night photography, including techniques and gear for working in natural light situations.
Post Date: 2/1/2017 2:37:25 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
The GoPro Karma Quadcopter is available for preorder from B&H with an expected availability at the end of March.
 
You might remember that the GoPro Karma was announced in September of last year, released a short time later, and then quickly recalled due to power failures mid-flight. According to GoPro, the issue has been resolved in upcoming re-release of the drone.
 
One big question remains, though: Which one is better for you, the DJI Mavic Pro or the GoPro Karma?
Category: Preorders
Post Date: 2/1/2017 12:00:45 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Lexar:
 
Doubled Capacity Allows Cinematographers, Filmmakers, and Content Creators to Capture Highest-Quality 4K Video and Beyond
 
MILPITAS, Calif., Jan. 31, 2017 – Lexar, a leading global brand of flash memory products, today announced doubled capacity for the Lexar Professional 3500x CFast 2.0 memory card, providing the capacity and speed thresholds needed for cinematographers, filmmakers, and content creators to capture the highest-quality 4K and ProRes video and RAW photos. The new 512GB capacity card is designed to address the exacting demands of today's top content innovators. The Lexar Professional 3600x CFast 2.0 card line, specifically optimized for ARRI cameras, will also double in capacity to 512GB in the first half of 2017.
 
"As professional imaging technology continues to advance, it's crucial that memory storage formats keep pace with ever-evolving data needs," said Jennifer Lee, product marketing director, Lexar. "When shooting 200 FPS on a high-end, production-level camera, it's easy to fill up an entire 256GB card with content in just 17 minutes. Comparatively, the new Professional 512GB 3500x CFast 2.0 card can capture up to more than twice that time. It's essential that professional content creators shooting in bandwidth-heavy applications such as RAW, 4K, burst-mode, time-lapse, and beyond have access to increasingly higher capacities and faster transfer speeds like those offered by the new 512GB Professional 3500x CFast 2.0 card."
 
The 512GB Professional 3500x CFast 2.0 card provides write speeds up to 445MB/s, for professionals to capture lots of footage and keep shooting. From the first take through to post-production, content innovators will have the speed and space needed to capture the highest cinema-quality video for their next masterpiece and quickly power through post-production with read transfer speeds up to 525MB/s. The Lexar Professional 3500x CFast 2.0 card includes a lifetime copy of Image Rescue software to recover most photo and select video files, even if they've been erased or the card has been corrupted.4 The card is also backed by expert technical support and a limited lifetime warranty. The new card capacity will be available in Q1 of 2017 with an MSRP of $1699.99. The Lexar Professional 3500x CFast 2.0 card line is also available in 32GB, 64GB, 128GB, and 256GB capacities. In addition, the Professional 3600x CFast 2.0 card line is available in 128GB and 256GB capacities. All Lexar products undergo extensive testing in the Lexar Quality Labs to validate performance, quality, compatibility, and reliability with more than 1,200 digital devices.
 
B&H carries the Lexar 512GB Professional 3500x CFast 2.0 Memory Card.
Category: Lexar News
Post Date: 2/1/2017 6:49:12 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the Rokinon SP 85mm f/1.2 Lens for Canon in stock with free expedited shipping.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Canon EF Mount/Full-Frame Format
  • Aperture Range: f/1.2 to f/16
  • One Aspherical Element
  • Two High Refractive Index Elements
  • Ultra Multi-Coating
  • Manual Focus Design
  • Aluminum Lens Housing
  • Nine-Blade Diaphragm
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 2/1/2017 5:14:28 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Tuesday, January 31, 2017
One of the first steps in using a new camera is to learn to process the RAW images it produces. I have shared my decision process and many comparison images on the Sony a7R II Review page.
 
Even if you have no interest in the Sony cameras, you may find the comparison interesting. More coming soon.
 
B&H has the Sony a7R II in stock with a $300.00 rebate. Also, for a huge bargain, trade in any camera or lens (even something of very low value) and get an additional $480.00 off of this camera (in addition to the trade-in value) or a significant amount off of many other Sony products.
Posted to: Sony News
Post Date: 1/31/2017 11:35:28 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
The team over at LensRentals has posted a teardown of the Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM lens.
 
From the LensRentals Blog:
As with most new lenses, a Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II made it’s way back to the repair department for an initial tear-down. I know there’s some randomness as to what we tear down, but we have some reasons for doing these. Sometimes, like with this new Canon, it’s simply because we know Lensrentals is going to stock a lot of them and we need to take a look inside to see what is likely to break and what parts we may want to order. And other times, like with this new Canon, it’s because there’s some new technology inside we want to take a look at.
 
And, of course, almost all the time these days, there’s some aphasic marketing terminology that leaves Aaron and I looking at each other wondering “what are they trying to say that is.” This time it was “NANO USM technology.” Did that mean there were little nanobots in there focusing the motors? Or that the focus group only had to move nanometers? The problem seemed to have been compounded because some retail and review sites were claiming it had a stepper motor, a ring USM, or both. That’s what happens, marketing department, when you make up words, nobody understands without explaining what you mean.
 
Looking inside seemed a good way to clarify that. Though Canon did tell what they meant a little bit, but nobody read it. The NANO USM focusing motor made its debut in the Canon 18-135 f/3.5–5.6 IS NANO USM lens last year, but not many people talked about it. It’s also discussed in Canon’s Knowledge Base NANO USM Article, but not many people read that. The NANO USM motor is a different focusing system for Canon, although manufacturers have used similar linear piezo systems.
 
And, as always, we wanted to see what engineering goodness Canon had inside that polycarbonate lens shell. We’re geeks. Sweet design pushes our buttons, and Canon lenses have had a lot of sweet engineering lately. Even though this is a consumer price range lens, the new digital focusing meter was cool, and we wanted to see if some of the impressive engineering Canon had put in their new L series lenses was drifting down to the consumer grade models.
 
So let’s tear up, I mean let’s carefully dissect, the new Canon 70-300mm IS. But first, let’s take a quick look at that nice digital readout. I can’t say it’s all that useful, but the depth-of-field-by-aperture display is a nice touch.
See the entire article on the LensRentals Blog.
 
B&H carries the Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM lens.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/31/2017 11:13:39 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Canon has released its FY 2016 financial results.
 
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/31/2017 8:43:55 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From the Canon Professional Network:
The EOS-1D X Mark II has won rave reviews since its launch back in February 2016 and to help users get more from its incredibly advanced focusing system, Canon has produced a handy downloadable AF Setting Guidebook for smartphone and tablets.
Download the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II AF Setting Guidebook via the Canon Professional Network.
 
Update: Whoops! We previously posted the guidebook's availability when CPN made it available back in November. For some odd reason, the Guidebook available via CPN is only 12MB compared to 100MB for the CDLC version (maybe the CDLC version is significantly higher in resolution?).
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/31/2017 5:46:13 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, January 30, 2017
by Sean Setters
 
A few short years ago, there were no super telephoto zooms featuring a 150-600mm focal length range. How things have changed...
 
In 2013, Tamron introduced the 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD, an affordable super telephoto zoom with a huge and versatile focal length range. The following year saw Sigma introducing a pair of similar lenses – the 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports & Contemporary models. Now Tamron has released an update to their original lens, adding a "G2" tag to the name.
 
Considering that neither Canon nor Nikon makes a native 150-600mm lens, it seems a bit odd to be spoiled for choice in this particular market segment. However, that's exactly what's happened. The third party manufacturers have solidly filled a niche that the big two lens manufacturers have yet to fill.
 
With so many options available, you may be wondering which one is the right lens for you. Read on for our take on this interesting crop of lenses.
 
Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lens and
Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 Lens
 
The lens that started it all, the Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lens, burst onto the scenes in 2013 and was immediately a popular choice for sports and wildlife photographers whose budgets did not extend to the Canon big white telephoto lens range. Its price-to-performance ratio makes it an excellent value.
 
This lens is sharpest in the middle of its focal length range with less sharp results produced at its widest and longest extents. Unfortunately, this lens turns in its worst performance at 600mm, an important factor considering that most consumers purchasing a 150-600mm lens likely intend to utilize the longest focal length a significant percentage of the time.
 
The Tamron 150-600 G1's vignetting performance is typically mild for lenses in its class, showing roughly 1-1.5 stops of corner shading when used on full frame cameras. Flare is fairly well controlled. You may notice mild pincushion distortion if straight lines are near the long edges of your frame.
 
Important for a lens such is this is weather sealing, and indeed Tamron's initial 150-600mm offering has a level of weather sealing. Like three of the four lenses in this comparison, the Tamron 150-600 G1 features a 95mm front filter thread. Filters of this size are certainly not inexpensive, but... compatibility with filters makes for a more versatile lens. Some may find Tamron's zooming mechanism, which rotates in the opposite direction compared to Canon lenses (Nikon standard), a bit frustrating.
 
Focusing is probably the weakest aspect of this lens. The Tamron 150-600 G1 we tested sometimes failed to lock on to a subject in good light even with a high contrast and accuracy consistency was not stellar. The good news is that Tamron eventually issued a firmware update to improve focus performance. We did not retest the lens, but initial reports suggested the AF performance was improved. The bad news is that, unlike its successor, this lens will require a trip to Tamron's service department to modify the firmware should an upgrade be necessary.
 
One obvious advantage of this lens is its budget-friendly price.
 
In a rather surprising move, Tamron released the 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 (Generation 2) Lens only 3 years after the introduction of its predecessor. Improvements included increased sharpness and contrast in the shorter and longer focal length ranges (with the middle focal length range remaining similar), an updated exterior design with metal construction, better AF and VC performance, a new zoom lock mechanism and compatibility with Tamron's new TAP-in console.
 
Differences in vignetting, flare and distortion are largely insignificant between the G2 version and its predecessor, which is somewhat surprising considering they feature different optical formulas. Lateral Chromatic Aberration (LatCA) is moderately apparent in both of these lenses, though correcting the issue in post processing is typically quite easy.
 
With the ability to update the lens' firmware and adjust focus parameters, the G2 version allows for more flexibility and peace of mind for its users. For those needing focal lengths beyond 600mm, the G2 has new dedicated 1.4x and 2x teleconverters available.
 
Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary Lens and
Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens
 
Sigma made a big splash in September 2014 when they announced two 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Global Vision lenses at the same time, featuring a Contemporary model and a higher grade Sports model.
 
Before we can quantify the differences between the Sigma models and Tamron models, we first need to see how the two Sigma models stack up against one another. Here's a brief rundown of the main differences:
 
  • Sports lens is roughly 2x more expensive
  • Sports lens has 24 elements in 16 groups while the Contemporary has 20 in 14
  • Sports lens has two FLD ("F" Low Dispersion with performance similar to fluorite) and three SLD (Special Low Dispersion) glass elements vs. one FLD and three SLD glass elements
  • Sports lens is significantly more-ruggedly constructed – alloy barrel and lens hood vs. composite
  • Sports lens is moderately larger
  • Sports lens is significantly heavier – 6.96 lbs vs. 4.49 lbs (3.16kg vs. 2.04kg)
  • Sports lens has a larger, smoother manual focus ring
  • Sports lens has dust & splash proof "construction" while the Contemporary has a dust & splash proof "mount"
  • Sports lens has a stronger, non-removeable tripod ring vs. removeable on the Contemporary
  • Contemporary lens has a 1/3 stop wider aperture over a small subset of the focal length range
  • Contemporary lens utilizes smaller filters – 95mm vs. 105mm
From a sharpness perspective, the 150-600 Contemporary lens edges out its Sports counterpart until 600mm where the Sports version is slightly better. Full frame camera owners will experience roughly 2 stops of vignetting in the extreme corners with both lenses. However, the Sports lens' vignetting is more gradual and encroaches farther into the center of the frame compared to the Contemporary lens (which has sharper falloff around the edges). While both lenses turn in average performances when it comes to flare, the Contemporary version features more contrast when the sun is in the corner of the frame. Both lenses show very slight pincushion distortion over the entire focal length range.
 
A benefit shared by both lenses is compatibility with Sigma's USB Dock, allowing for easy end-user firmware updates and access to customizable focus options.
 
Feature Comparison & Max Aperture by Focal Length
 
Below is a feature comparison chart followed by the available maximum apertures by focal length for the lenses discussed above.
 
LensElements/
Groups
Lens Measured
Dimensions (DxL)
Weight w/Hood
& Tripod Ring
Filter
Thread
Weather
Sealing?
Tamron 150-600 G120/134.15 x 10.57”
(105.5 x 268.5mm)
74.5 oz (2110g)95mmY
Tamron 150-600 G221/134.27 x 10.54”
(108.5 x 267.68mm)
74.7 oz (2115g)95mmY
Sigma 150-600 C20/144.12 x 10.55”
(104.7 x 267.99mm)
71.8 oz (2035g)95mmN
Sigma 150-600 Sports24/164.76 x 11.77”
(120.95 x 299.05mm)
111.4 oz (3155g)105mmY

Modelf/5.0f/5.6f/6.3
Tamron 150-600 G1150-225mm226-427mm428-600mm
Tamron 150-600 G2150-212mm213-427mm428-600mm
Sigma 150-600 Contemporary150-179mm180-387mm388-600mm
Sigma 150-600 Sports150-184mm185-320mm321-600mm

Subjective Rankings
 
With all of these lenses featuring identical focal length/aperture ranges and similar features (like vibration/optical stabilization), other lens aspects become the prominent differentiating factors. And, even image quality is close enough among the group to not be a major decision factor. Here's how we would rank each lens based on our own personal experience:
 
Image Quality
 
  1. Sigma 150-600 Contemporary & Tamron 150-600 G2
  2. Sigma 150-600 Sports
  3. Tamron 150-600 G1
Build Quality
 
  1. Tamron 150-600 G2 & Sigma 150-600 Sports
  2. Tamron 150-600 G1
  3. Sigma 150-600 Contemporary
AF Responsiveness/Accuracy/Consistency
 
  1. Sigma 150-600 Sports & Tamron 150-600 G2
  2. Sigma 150-600 Contemporary
  3. Tamron 150-600 G1
Value
 
  1. Sigma 150-600 Contemporary
  2. Tamron 150-600 G2
  3. Tamron 150-600 G1
  4. Sigma 150-600 Sports
Conclusions
 
If you do not need weather sealing, it's difficult to top the value offered by the Sigma 150-600mm Contemporary lens. It's only slightly less expensive than the Tamron 150-600 G1 (the least expensive lens in this group) yet offers class-leading image quality and customizability via Sigma's USB Dock. If weather sealing and focus consistency are a priority, the Sigma 150-600 Sports and Tamron 150-600 G2 should be your top considerations, with the deciding factor likely being the price-to-image-quality performance ratio desired. And lastly, the lens that started it all – the Tamron 150-600 G1 – still remains a good choice if one's budget is the primary limiting factor.
Post Date: 1/30/2017 12:10:14 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Sunday, January 29, 2017
Storms on the horizon and mostly cloudy overhead. That is what I saw when I stepped out of the Middle Caicos villa well before sunrise. While I admit that going back to bed seemed like a good (and justifiable) option, I knew that storms could bring desired drama and resisted that urge. While a sky completely covered in rainstorm was not of interest to me on this morning, I saw enough breaks in the clouds to give hope for some dramatic skies and I stayed with the plan.
 
Mudjin Harbor is my favorite location in the causeway-connected North and Middle Caicos islands (Turks and Caicos Islands are just north of Haiti and Dominican Republic). The cliffs and beaches in this location are stunning and the color of the water is among the best anywhere. The close-to-shore reef system brings entertainment in terms of waves and many small ironshore formation limestone rock islands dot the landscape, including Dragon Cay (Dragon Island) as seen here.
 
At this resolution, it is not especially easy to recognize the dragon lying in the water, but the rightmost large rock is shaped like a horn-nosed dragon head with its body (including shoulders and hips) flowing to the left and followed by its tail. A goal for this trip was to capture some images that included this fun land formation in them and having a nearby villa was part of the plan implementation.
 
A big attraction of Mudjun Harbor is a pair of caves and one of the caves faces the beast. A great and popular compositional technique is to frame a subject within its surroundings and one of my favorite natural frames is the opening of a cave. In addition to making a good frame, this particular cave offered a couple of additional benefits on this morning.
 
First, the sustained wind speed was just over 30 mph and gusts were reaching 50+ mph. That is fierce enough to blow a camera and tripod over and strong enough to make it difficult to even stand up, let alone frame and capture a sharp image. It is strong enough to make a painful whistle across one's ears and strong enough to blow salt water deep inland (causing, minimally, front lens element clarity issues). I was able to get deep enough into this cave to essentially eliminate the wind factor.
 
You can see the other issue approaching in this image. A small-but-significant rainstorm is close and on direct course for my position. The cave offered shelter from the rain and allowed me to photograph continuously as it approached and hit.
 
The word "cave" is often used to describe a dark venue and though these cave walls were brighter than many, they were quite dark and the backlit clouds were much brighter. This scenario means that an HDR technique was required. Two images with different exposures were manually (painstakingly in this case) blended in Photoshop to achieve the result seen here.
 
Obviously, this rainstorm was back-lit by the sun and direct sunlight on rain holds promise for another highly valued, loved-by-everyone landscape photography element that I'll share later.
 
A larger version of this image is available on BryanCarnathan.com, Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
Post Date: 1/29/2017 7:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
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