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 Tuesday, February 7, 2017
Through February 12, use coupon code BHWPPI17 at B&H to get $50.00 Off the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art and 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lenses.
Post Date: 2/7/2017 2:10:58 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Sigma Corporation of America recently clarified its Gray Market Service Policy which went into effect January 1, 2017. In it, Sigma USA warns that not only will it refuse to repair gray market items for free under warranty, but that it will charge a $250.00 service fee on top of the parts and labor costs for repairing gray market goods. See below for Sigma USA's new official Gray Market Service Policy (we bolded part of the last sentence for emphasis).
 
From Sigma:
Gray Market
As of January 1, 2017, any product that is not imported by the Sigma Corporation of America or purchased from an unauthorized Sigma USA Dealer will not be serviced under warranty regardless of the service required. The Sigma Corporation of America Service department will service these products for a minimum $250 charge in addition to the required parts and labor charges at the owner's expense.
B&H, Amazon and Adorama are all authorized Sigma retailers.
Category: Sigma News
Post Date: 2/7/2017 10:58:56 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Through midnight tonight Eastern Time, B&H has the Senal MC24-ES Professional Condenser Shotgun Microphone available for $99.95 with free shipping. Regularly $209.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • For Film, Broadcast & Video Production
  • Hypercardioid Polar Pattern
  • Tailored for Rich Natural-Sounding Vocal
  • Full Range Frequency Response
  • Superb Side and Rear Signal Rejection
  • Selectable High-Pass Filter
  • 7.1" Long, Compact and Lightweight
  • Operates on 48V Phantom Power
  • Durable Brass Construction
  • Rubberized Low Reflection Matte Coating
Post Date: 2/7/2017 10:36:43 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
For a limited time, B&H has the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art (review) available with a $100.00 instant savings.
 
For what it's worth, this is one of my favorite lenses and one that I reach for quite often. [Sean]
Post Date: 2/7/2017 9:37:57 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Want to add some creative flair to your newborn photo sessions?
 
B&H has Custom Props Newborn Photography Props on sale for 15% off. Items include wraps, diaper covers, crowns and faux fur fabrics.
Post Date: 2/7/2017 9:16:28 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the B&H YouTube Channel:
 
Think you know your Nikon camera? You might reconsider after spending an afternoon with Nikon Technical Sales Representative, Alex Podstawski. Join Alex as he shares some of his favorite tips and tricks for making digital images better.
 
If you own any of Nikon’s DSLRs, than this seminar is made just for you! During this informative seminar, you'll discover things about your Nikon DSLR that will help you take your picture creation to a whole new level.
 
B&H carries Nikon cameras and lenses.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 2/7/2017 9:13:02 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Is an electronic viewfinder (EVF) better than an optical viewfinder (OVF)? Or even an acceptable alternative? Though some DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) cameras have EVFs, a major consideration when selecting between an MILC (Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera) and a conventional DSLR is that the MILC will not have an optical viewfinder (OVF). As more MILCs become available and as this camera type gains in popularity, these questions are becoming more important ones for this site's audience to answer.
 
With no mirror or optical viewfinder, MILCs utilize data coming off of the imaging sensor to display the TTL (Through the Lens) view on an LCD. That LCD panel can be on the back of the camera or in a viewfinder where it is typically referred to as an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder). This is not a new technology, but one that has been utilized by many non-MILC digital cameras, practically since digital cameras existed.
 
Relevant to this site's audience is the replacement of the traditional DSLR OVF with an EVF. Safe to say is that all high-grade cameras produced today have an LCD that can be used for mirror-up, live view of an image that is about to be captured. Therefore, the benefits of an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder) relate to being able to see an LCD with the camera placed at one's eye. Making the difference less black and white is that LCD viewfinders/shades/loupes, such as those by Hoodman, are available for use on the rear LCD, effectively giving all digital cameras an "EVF".
 
To get started with the comparisons, let's look at:
 
The Advantages of All Live View LCD Displays Over Optical Viewfinders
 
A big advantage of an electronic viewfinder is the WYSIWYG (What You See is What You Get) image preview. Able to be included in the LCD image preview is the actual exposure brightness, optionally including a histogram and over/underexposure warnings. Also able to be included in the preview are the net results of other camera settings being applied, including white balance, contrast and saturation. This preview is usually able to show a 100% view of the composition vs. a slightly cropped view shown by many OVFs.
 
When shooting in a very dark environment, it becomes very difficult to compose an image using an optical viewfinder. By using an amplified signal from the sensor, an LCD viewfinder can present a much brighter image that greatly facilitates composition. A "dark environment" can include the use of a strong neutral density filter under even bright daylight conditions.
 
Under the extreme opposite lighting conditions, the LCD can offer protection to your eyes. At the extreme end of the brightness category, the sun poses a serious risk to eyesight. Eye damage can easily occur if looking at the sun through an OVF, especially with a telephoto focal length in use. An LCD's maximum brightness is not dangerous to the eye, even with the sun in the center of the frame. There is little risk to your eyes when viewing the sun in an LCD, but note that your camera may not fare as well.
 
An LCD does not need a viewfinder shutter or cover to prevent unwanted light from affecting the metering or exposure.
 
A mirror assembly is required for OVFs, but not for LCDs. Removing the mirror assembly has some advantages, including the cost of the assembly being eliminated (though EVFs also have a cost that must be factored back in). The mirror assembly has moving parts and moving parts may eventually require replacement (though the life of a DSLR mirror assembly is usually a very significant number of actuations).
 
The lack of mirror movement creates some additional benefits. First, a mirror rapidly flipping up and down makes noise and a camera operating without a mirror is considerably quieter. Mirror movement causing vibration during the exposure becomes a non-concern. Also, the mirror lockup function becomes obsolete. Without the rapid mirror movement, airflow in the mirror box is reduced, which may in turn reduce instances of dust adhering on the sensor. Take the lens off of an electronic first curtain shutter MILC (a common design) and the imaging sensor is right there, easily accessible for cleaning.
 
The lack of a mirror forces another primary differentiator between non-OVF vs. OVF cameras and that is, without a mirror, the imaging sensor must be used for all pre-shot calculations, including auto focus and auto exposure. While there are some disadvantages to the mirrorless design in these regards (primarily related to AF speed), those weaknesses are diminishing as technology moves forward. One advantage is that the LCD provides a much larger AF area coverage with (at least potentially) more AF points. Another is that, with focusing taking place precisely on the imaging sensor, AFMA (Auto Focus Microadjustment) is no longer needed and lens focus calibration becomes a non-issue.
 
With the LCD previewing the image about to be captured, precise focusing can be monitored, including focus peaking indication. Also, an enlarged view of a portion of the frame can be selected to verify focusing or to aid in precise manual focusing. With the tremendously detailed information the sensor makes available, technologies including face and smile detection can be implemented.
 
While intelligent optical viewfinders have shown great advances in recent years, complete with transparent LCD overlays, they don't come close to the capabilities of LCDs in terms of the information that can be shown. A high-resolution LCD panel with a huge palette of colors available provides designers great flexibility in creating a camera's graphical user interface and also in the customization capability of that interface.
 
Though a bigger advantage for true EVF cameras, LCD displays can provide an immediate display of a captured image precisely where the photographer is looking at time the image is captured (such as directly through the viewfinder). However, I must note that this review interrupts the capture of a subsequent image and that I now turn off the image review feature on the EVF cameras I'm using. Still, the press of a button brings the image review display up without the need to move the camera or look elsewhere.
 
While some manufacturers (including Canon and Nikon) contend that image stabilization technology works best in the lens vs. in-camera (and there is validity to this claim), inarguable is that the effects of in-camera image stabilization will not be seen in an optical viewfinder, leaving the view shaky.
 
Again, camera-back LCDs and EVFs (which also use an LCD) share the benefits just described.
 
Differences Between Primary LCDs and Viewfinders (Both EVFs and OVFs)
 
As mentioned, when it gets dark, LCD live view displays and EVFs are much easier to compose with than OVFs. However, in bright daylight, even the best rear LCDs become very difficult to see and I find it especially challenging to compose using the rear LCD under direct sunlight. In contrast, viewfinders make it easy to critically view the composition under even the brightest conditions, giving them a huge advantage over a rear LCD under bright daylight conditions.
 
I wear eyeglasses a good percentage of the time (and that percentage is increasing). If you do not need corrective optics now, you will – it is only a matter of time. I have reading/computer glasses and another set with a distance prescription for seeing longer distances. When out and about with a camera, I seldom have both sets of glasses with me and I often wear none. This means that the image on the camera's rear LCD, within arm's length, appears slightly fuzzy to me. Yes, bifocals and trifocals are options that would help with this issue, but ... I have not appreciated the limited views that these provide. Dioptric adjustments provided by viewfinders resolve this issue, permitting a clear view of what I'm about to photograph and review of what I already photographed.
 
Another key viewfinder advantage is that it provides additional stability for holding the camera steady. While it can also lead to AEB, the camera pressed against an eyebrow adds a significant third point of stability in addition to two hands. Also, this position allows both elbows to be tucked into the ribs, increasing stability even more.
 
A camera's primary LCD tends to collect fingerprints and other smudges at a rapid pace and these can interfere with visibility of the display, especially in bright light. A viewfinder, to the contrary, tends to stay clean. However, a viewfinder, with its inset glass, is harder to clean than a primary LCD that, especially if properly coated, easily wipes clean with a microfiber cloth.
 
Advantages of Electronic Viewfinders over Main LCDs
 
As mentioned, an accessory viewfinder/shade/loupe can turn a camera's rear LCD into the equivalent of an EVF. A downside is that LCD loupes are not nearly as well integrated into the camera design as EVFs are – built-in EVFs are considerably more compact and less intrusive. External loupes also get in the way of touch screen functionality.
 
Advantages of Eliminating the OVF
 
A primary attraction of MILCs is their smaller size and lighter weight. Eliminating the mirror box and OVF immediately reduce the footprint of a camera, permitting these design advantages.
 
Advantages of Optical Viewfinders
 
With resolution not limited by dots of pixels (that can appear to flicker as they change colors when framing is adjusted) and refresh rates not limited by an electronic display, huge advantages of an OVF include resolution and responsiveness. In addition to seemingly unlimited resolution and refresh rates happening at the speed of light, OVF dynamic range is limited only by our eyesight. An LCD has a limited dynamic range and may show blocked shadows and blown highlights. Though the dynamic range of the image captured via an OVF system will similarly be limited by the imaging sensor, seeing the full brightness range is different.
 
The EVF properties just discussed can leave the photographer feeling somewhat disconnected from the moment, akin to watching a movie of an event vs. seeing it in-person as an OVF provides the sense of.
 
While an LCD can make low light composition easier, a photographer's eye must constantly adjust between the bright display and dark ambient light levels. Generally speaking, the brightness seen through an OVF is similar to what is seen without the camera in use.
 
While removing the mirror assembly brings some advantages, the mirror provides a level of protection to the imaging sensor. Take the lens off of an OVF camera and it is the mirror that becomes exposed instead of the imaging sensor.
 
While not directly related to the viewfinder type, MILCs are very commonly given EVFs with reduced camera size and weight being two of the common design targets. Especially with the smaller MILCs, using large lenses and full-sized flashes can lead to a tail-wagging-the-dog scenario where the provided grip is inadequate or only marginally adequate to maintain control of the overall setup. OVF cameras are often larger, making larger lenses and flashes easier to control.
 
While on the size topic, If considering an MILC for size and weight reduction purposes, make sure that the MILC lenses you need do not make up for some of the camera footprint and weight difference. While most of these cameras indeed have a smaller footprint than their DSLR equivalents, the size of the lenses needs to be considered and these are not necessarily smaller. The smaller camera does not change optical properties and the image circle size required by the same-size sensor remains the same.
 
Though these cameras often utilize a short back-focus lens design and some lenses are indeed smaller, some of the smaller lenses also have narrower maximum apertures. MILCs may need an adapter to use the manufacturer's standard lenses (the Canon EOS M series for example). While an adaptor can tremendously extend the number of lenses a camera is compatible with, it is an extra part to buy, carry and use. And, it makes the camera (or each lens) effectively larger and heavier in use, with the EF to EOS-M adaptor adding a modest 1" (26mm) and 3.77 oz. (107g) respectively.
 
With the imaging sensor required to be powered up for an EVF to function and because an EVF's full-color LCD requires its own share of power, EVFs require more battery capacity for an equivalent number of photos to be captured. However, battery size, and with it, capacity is a typical sacrifice made by MILCs. As a result, cameras with EVFs often have considerably lower battery life ratings. A faster battery exhaustion rate greatly increases the chance that the battery will become fully drained just when the perfect image presents itself (one of Bryan's Laws of Photography).
 
Roughly figure an EVF system to require at least twice as many batteries as an OVF system. If you often carry a spare battery with your OVF camera, you should probably carry 3 or 4 with an EVF camera. Additional batteries add to the system cost, carrying extra batteries adds to the system weight and maintaining the charge of additional batteries requires maintenance and logistics – and probably at least a second charger as you can potentially drain batteries faster than you can charge them.
 
Do you ever look through your viewfinder with the camera powered off? Perhaps when setting up a tripod and composing a scene? Complete blackness is what you will see if doing so with an EVF camera.
 
If shooting action, I still want an OVF. While EVFs have made great strides in recent years, they have not yet equaled OVF systems in some important regards, especially in their ability to capturing a precise moment of action. As mentioned, EVF response rates are not light-speed and every microsecond counts when a precise moment in time needs to be captured. Advances in on-sensor AF capabilities have brought recently-produced EVF camera performance much closer to the traditional phase detection systems found in OVF cameras. But, traditional phase-detection AF systems still modestly outperform current on-sensor performance in the critical-for-action speed component.
 
Most OVF systems have a significantly shorter blackout time during the image capture and if following action, this is a critical factor. The difference at this time (Canon EOS M5 and Sony a7R II era) is significant enough that I find EVF cameras practically unusable for tracking/framing a moving subject even with image review turned off. I can keep a straight-on-approaching/leaving subject in the frame for a period of time with an EVF, but if they move to the side, my framing quickly falls apart.
 
Summary
 
So, back to the questions: Is an electronic viewfinder (EVF) better than an optical viewfinder (OVF) and is an EVF an acceptable alternative to an OVF?
 
The answer to both of those questions is yes or no. It depends. Both designs have advantages and disadvantages and how appropriate either type is for you depends on your personal needs.
 
As mentioned, using a shade/loupe/viewfinder on the rear LCD can provide the EVF features to most cameras and cameras with an OVF can then have the best of both features. Better still is the talk of a hybrid viewfinder being introduced. Such would feature the option of an OVF or an EVF selectable as desired. Transparent LCD overlays have been available in better DSLR models for years now, so the idea does not seem far-fetched.
 
What did I miss? Have any other thoughts in this regard? Please share these in the comments.
Post Date: 2/7/2017 8:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
B&H has the Transcend CFX650 256GB CFast 2.0 Flash Memory Card (review) available for $349.99 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $449.99.
 
For what it's worth, Bryan has been very impressed with this card's performance paired with the EOS-1D X Mark II.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 256GB Capacity
  • 510 MB/s Read Speed
  • 370 MB/s Write Speed
  • MLC NAND Flash Chips
  • Designed for 4K & Full HD Cinematography
  • Built-In Error Correcting Code (ECC)
  • RecoveRx Photo Recovery Software
B&H has the Tenba Discovery: Mini Photo/Laptop Messenger (Sage/Khaki) available for $39.95 with free shipping. Regularly $109.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Holds DSLR With 2-3 Lenses, Flash
  • Separate Rear Pocket for 13" Computer
  • Removable Photo Insert
  • Front Pockets for Accessories
  • Wide, Padded Removable Shoulder Strap
  • Water-Repellent Nylon Exterior
  • Waterproof Bottom Panel
  • Self-Healing Zippers
  • Trolley Sleeve / Mesh Pockets for Water
  • Includes Rain Cover
Post Date: 2/7/2017 5:11:20 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Through midnight tonight Eastern Time, B&H has the WD 2TB My Passport Pro Portable RAID Storage Drive available for $169.95 with free shipping. Regularly $249.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 2TB Storage Capacity
  • Attached 14" / 35.6 cm Thunderbolt Cable
  • Thunderbolt Interface
  • Typical Data Transfer Rate: 233 MB/s
  • Max. Data Transfer Rate: 10 Gb/s
  • Formatted HFS+J for Mac
  • RAID 0 & 1 Compatible
  • Plug-and-Play Setup
 Monday, February 6, 2017
From Tamron:
 
Compact, high-performance lens boasts the largest focal length range in its class
 
February 6, 2017, Commack, NY – Tamron, a leading manufacturer of optics for diverse applications, announces the launch of 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II VC HLD (Model B023), a new ultra-wideangle zoom lens for APS-C DSLR cameras. The lens is expected to be available in the U.S. this Spring at $499.
 
Model B023 is a wideangle zoom lens that covers an exceptionally large range—the largest focal length range in its class1 (35mm equivalent is 16mm to 37mm). The lens is ideal for street photography, landscapes, group photos and casual everyday scenes. In 2008, Tamron launched the SP AF 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II LD Aspherical [IF] (Model B001) that provided an unprecedented focal length range in its class. Building on that lens’s popularity, the successor Model B023 has improved optical performance and new features. It embodies Tamron’s most advanced technologies, including the VC (Vibration Compensation) system, Moisture-Resistant Construction and Fluorine Coating, and the first implementation of Tamron’s new HLD (High/Low torque modulated Drive). Additionally, the Model B023 has a refreshing new design derived from the design of the new product lineup in the SP series.
 
PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS
 
1. Inheriting the broadest focal length range in its class of ultra-wideangle zoom lenses
The new Model B023 achieves a broad focal length range of 10-24mm, the largest range among ultra-wideangle zoom lenses for APS-C DSLR cameras. This is the 35mm equivalent of covering a very wideangle of view, from 16mm ultra-wideangle to 37mm semi-wideangle. A photographer can enjoy diverse wideangle expressions with just this one lens, from dynamic landscapes far beyond the normal human field of vision to simple, casual snapshots.
 
2. Improved optical performance across the entire zoom range
The optical design of the new Model B023 consists of 16 lens elements in 11 groups. Special lens elements are utilized in an optimum configuration of one LD (Low Dispersion) lens element, one XLD glass element, one molded glass aspherical element, and one hybrid aspherical lens. While curbing an increase in the size of the optical system, the new lens very effectively compensates for a wide variety of aberrations in the entire zoom range, including transverse chromatic aberration, comatic aberration and distortions that tend to become more prominent with a wideangle lens.
 
Tamron’s highly regarded BBAR (Broad-Band Anti-Reflection) Coating and the optical design paying close attention to internal reflections in the lens barrel also curb the effects of harmful light rays that tend to occur with a wideangle lens, achieving excellent resistance against ghosting and flare seen in backlighting situations.
 
3. 4-Stop Vibration Compensation that is especially useful in low light conditions
In response to the requests of many customers who have asked the company to equip a wideangle lens with image stabilization, we have now installed Tamron’s acclaimed VC (Vibration Compensation) on the new Model B023. Optimizing the actuator and the control algorithm has made it possible to incorporate the VC, while maintaining the compact design of the previous Model B001. The VC especially enhances the photographer’s freedom in handheld shooting at dusk or in a dimly lit room, and under other relatively low light conditions, as the mechanism proves particularly effective in the shooting conditions with slower shutter speeds.
 
4. Equipped for the first time with the new HLD with outstanding driving power and stability
Tamron’s new HLD (High/Low torque modulated Drive) has been developed for use as the AF drive system for Model B023. With its outstanding driving power and stability, the HLD is capable of smoothly controlling the AF mechanism of the new Model B023 that is actually equipped with large focusing lens elements. When shooting in AF mode, the Full-time Manual Focus override allows you to instantly make fine focusing adjustments manually, without having to switch between modes.
 
5. Compressed into a compact body with structural ingenuity
While enhancing image quality, adding new functions and substantially improving the basic performance, Model B023’s space-saving design has ensured an optimum configuration for components such as the VC and AF unit, thus successfully reducing overall length compared to the previous Model B001. The lightweight and compact body with outstanding ease of use will prove to be very well-balanced when attached to an APS-C DSLR camera.
 
6. An even more user-friendly lens with Fluorine Coating and Moisture-Resistant Construction
The front surface of the foremost lens element is coated with a protective fluorine compound that is water- and oil-repellant. The lens surface is easier to wipe clean and is less vulnerable to the damaging effects of dirt, dust, moisture and fingerprints, allowing for much easier maintenance. For greater protection when shooting outdoors, leak-proof seals throughout the lens barrel help protect your equipment.
 
7. Electromagnetic diaphragm system now used also for Nikon-mount lenses
An electromagnetic diaphragm system, which has been a standard feature for Canon-mount lenses, is now employed in Nikon-mount lenses2. More precise diaphragm and aperture control is possible because the diaphragm blades are driven and controlled by a motor through electronic pulse signals.
 
8. Compatible with TAMRON TAP-in ConsoleTM, an optional accessory product
The optional TAP-in Console provides a USB connection to your personal computer, enabling you to easily update your lens’s firmware as well as customize features including fine adjustments to the AF and VC.
 
9. External design placing importance on functionality and ease of use
While inheriting the design that makes use of a lot of organic curves and the delicately polished form down to fine details that characterize the SP lens series, the new Model B023 comes with a highly sophisticated design that also places much importance on the lens’s functionality and ease of use, featuring an overall form that faithfully encompasses the internal structures within, a slim Luminous Gold brand ring, the switch shape and the distance-scale window design.
 
B&H has the Tamron 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II VC HLD available for preorder.
Post Date: 2/6/2017 6:48:34 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Tamron:
 
All-new optical design delivers a dramatically faster autofocus speed and image stabilization performance of 5 stops
 
February 6, 2017, Commack, NY – Tamron, a leading manufacturer of optics for diverse applications, announces the launch of SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A025), a new telephoto zoom lens product for full-frame and APS-C DSLR cameras. Model A025 was developed by substantially enhancing the features of its predecessor. These include a thorough review of the optical, mechanical and electronic designs to increase autofocus speed and precision, reinforce VC (Vibration Compensation) functions and to shorten the MOD. New features include eBAND Coating, Moisture-Proof and Dust-Resistant Construction, Fluorine Coating and compatibility with teleconverters. The lens design features a metal-based barrel for improved handling and ease-of-use. The result of this dramatic evolution is Model A025, a high-speed telephoto lens that widens the scope of expression for photography in a broad range of genres, such as portraits, landscapes, sports and photojournalism. The lens is expected to be available in the U.S. in March at $1299.
 
PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS
 
1. Outstanding resolution and contrast reproduction performance, beautiful bokeh and full compatibility with Tamron teleconverters
Based on the current model (A009), the optical design has been revised and improved. Both the resolution and contrast reproduction performance far exceed the present levels. Bokeh has been enhanced and expanded to deliver outstanding background effects across the entire zoom range. Use of a circular diaphragm with nine blades further improves bokeh. The optical design of the new A025 consists of 23 elements in 17 groups. Optimum deployment of XLD (eXtra Low Dispersion) and LD (Low Dispersion) glass elements thoroughly eliminate chromatic aberrations, which tend to become particularly prominent in high-speed telephoto lenses, across the entire zoom range, while ensuring uniform, high-level image quality even on the periphery of the image plane.
 
The new lens is also fully compatible with the TELECONVERTER 1.4x (Model TC-X14) and TELECONVERTER 2.0x (Model TC-X20)[1], which increase the focal length of the lens to 1.4 times and 2 times the original, respectively. Both teleconverters are carefully designed and constructed to provide outstanding high quality.
 
2. Improved VC system provides highest Vibration Compensation ability in its class[3] (5 stops using CIPA standard compliant) and offers three situation-specific VC modes
Utilizing Tamron's original VC (Vibration Compensation) system, which uses a moving coil mechanism, further reinforcement of the drive system power and control performance has now achieved the highest VC level in its class, with an image stabilization performance of 5 stops according to the CIPA standard (using VC Mode 3).
 
Also, the VC system of Model A025 offers three VC modes, including one mode exclusively for panning. Photographers can freely choose between the different VC modes according to their shooting conditions. Even when telephoto shooting in low light, which tends to be severely affected by camera shake, photographers can now enjoy jitter-free handheld shooting with much greater flexibility.
 
  • VC MODE 1 is the standard mode that strikes a great balance between the stability of the viewfinder image and the stabilization effects.
  • VC MODE 2 is exclusively used for panning.
  • VC MODE 3 prioritizes the stabilization of the captured images and forgoes the stabilization of the viewfinder image.
With the optional accessory TAMRON TAP-in Console, you can customize the configuration of VC MODE 1. Choose the viewfinder view of either standard or image priority.
 
3. Demonstratively improved autofocus speed and responsiveness
Model A025 is equipped with a USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive) ring-type ultrasonic motor, whose outstanding responsiveness and control ensures accurate high-speed focusing. Incorporating two advanced, high-performance microcomputers and optimizing the algorithm has improved both the focusing speed and accuracy compared with SP 70-200mm (Model A009). Additionally, thanks to the Full-time Manual Focus override mechanism, photographers shooting with AF can instantaneously make fine focusing adjustments using MF without wasting time by switching the AF-MF mode back and forth. 4. Focuses closer (shorter Minimum Object Distance, or MOD) for greater versatility Improvements made to the focus cam and zoom cam inside the lens barrel have reduced the MOD from 50.7 inches in the older Model A009 to 37.4 inches for Model A025, which has a maximum magnification ratio of 1:6.1. The shorter MOD, coupled with the excellent optical performance of the SP 70-200mm (Model A025), allows photographers to further broaden their range of expression.
 
5. Optimized and exclusively designed eBAND Coating
The new A025 features Tamron's original eBAND (Extended Bandwidth & Angular-Dependency) Coating, a technology that combines a nano-structured layer with an extremely low refractive index with the conventional multiple-layer coatings. Optimized and exclusively designed for this new zoom, the eBAND Coating provides superior anti-reflection performance, effectively reducing any flare and ghosting. Even when taking backlit portraits, the new lens delivers flawless, crystal clear images.
 
6. Moisture-Proof and Dust-Resistant Construction
Ideal for use in outdoor photography, the new 70-200mm telephoto zoom has moisture-resistant construction because special sealants that are dust-resistant and moisture-resistant are used at every joint and seam. The sealant material helps to prevent the intrusion of any dirt, dust or water droplets, compared to conventional Moisture-Resistant Construction.
 
7. Fluorine Coating for greater protection
The front surface of the lens element is coated with a protective fluorine compound that is water- and oil-repellant. The lens surface is easier to wipe clean and less vulnerable to the damaging effects of dirt, dust, moisture and fingerprints.
 
8. Electromagnetic diaphragm system now used also for Nikon-mount lenses
An electromagnetic diaphragm system, which has been a standard feature for Canon-mount lenses, is now available for Nikon-mount lenses[4]. More precise diaphragm and aperture control is possible because the diaphragm blades are driven and controlled by the motor through electronic pulse signals.
 
9. Lightweight and easy-to-hold tripod mount is compatible with Arca-Swiss style quick release plates
A new textured grip and Arca-Swiss style tripod interface enhances both speed and utility. Because the tripod mount is made of lightweight magnesium, it is much easier to carry.
 
10. Compatible with TAMRON TAP-in Console, an optional accessory product
The optional TAP-in Console provides a USB connection to a personal computer, enabling users to easily update the lens firmware as well as customize features, including fine adjustments to the AF and VC.
 
11. Based on the rigorous quality standards worthy of the SP series, this new lens is manufactured with a thorough attention to details
For the SP series products in particular, Tamron has established rigorous design and quality standards. These standards apply to the optical design, mechanical design and the cosmetic appearance, as well as to such wide-ranging areas as the product's robustness and improvements in the various individual functions. Tamron thoroughly reviews all of the design and manufacturing processes in order to offer products to customers with even-higher levels of precision and quality.
 
For the SP 70-200mm G2 (Model A025), the optical design was refreshed, mechanical parts were improved and a new exterior design was adopted. To maximize the optical performance intrinsic to this product, Tamron improved the accuracy of the component parts and increased the precision of the overall zooming mechanism.
 
B&H has the Tamron SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 available for preorder.
Post Date: 2/6/2017 6:46:48 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
For a limited time, use coupon code BHWPPI17 at B&H to get the X-Rite ColorChecker Passport Photo for $59.00 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $89.00.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Creative Enhancement Target
  • Classic Target
  • White Balance Target
  • Protective Pocket-Sized Case
  • Camera Calibration Software
  • Accurate Consistent Color
Post Date: 2/6/2017 1:19:33 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
For a limited time, use coupon code BHWPPI17 at B&H to get the X-Rite i1Display Pro for $179.00 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $224.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Advanced Filter and Optical Systems
  • Works On All Modern Display Technologies
  • Field-Upgradeable for Future Technology
  • Rotating Diffuser Arm / Tripod Mount
  • Basic and Advanced Modes
  • Ambient Light Measurement/Smart Control
  • Flare Correct
  • Intelligent Profiling for Color Accuracy
  • Automatic Hardware Adjustment
Through February 14, use coupon code LENSLOVE at LensRentals.com to get 50% off your second rental item in the same order.
 
*Valid for orders placed 2/6 - 2/14/17. Discount applies to the 2nd most expensive item.
Post Date: 2/6/2017 12:40:50 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
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