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 Tuesday, December 30, 2014
Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S Lens
Standard test results are now available on the Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S Lens Review page.
 
B&H has the Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S Lens in stock.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 12/30/2014 9:14:41 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, December 24, 2014
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens
I know that many of you were waiting on this one: Image quality results from the Canon EOS 7D Mark II have now been added to Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens page.
 
Again, preorder your Canon EF 100-400mm L IS II USM Lens now at B&H.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/24/2014 10:03:03 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, December 23, 2014
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens
Image quality results from the Canon EOS 60D have now been added to Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens page.
 
Here is a preloaded comparison between the version I and II lenses tested on the 60D. The difference is very noticeable.
 
Next up: Image quality results from the EOS 7D Mark II. The 7D II is sharper at the same sharpness setting and this should be reflected in the results.
 
B&H has significant quantities of the Canon EF 100-400mm L IS II USM Lens arriving regularly.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/23/2014 12:56:47 PM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, December 22, 2014
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens Side View
Image quality results from a second lens (presented as Sample 1) have been added to the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens page.
 
Again, I think that you are going to like what you see. Both lenses perform superbly and the two copies of this lens perform nearly identically. The second lens is very slightly sharper in the corners over part of the focal length range (look at the 200mm and 400mm samples to see this).
 
Here is a preloaded comparison between the two lenses with the second lens presented as the default/left lens.
 
Distortion and vignetting test results are also now available for this lens.
 
B&H has significant quantities of the Canon EF 100-400mm L IS II USM Lens arriving regularly. Demand has been very high.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/22/2014 7:53:53 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Sunday, December 21, 2014
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens Front View
Standard product images are now available for the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens.
 
Visually compare the 100-400 L II to your favorite lens. Here are a couple of comparisons to get you started:
 
100-400 L II between the 100-400 L and 70-300 L
100-400 L II between the 70-200 f/2.8L II and Tamron 150-600
 
Preorder your Canon EF 100-400mm L IS II now at B&H. Significant shipment quantities have been arriving – and leaving just as quickly.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/21/2014 7:10:47 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, December 18, 2014
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens
Image quality results have been added to Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens review page. I think that you are going to like what you see.
 
Here are some comparisons that you might find interesting:
 
Compared to the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM Lens
Compared to the Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM Lens
Compared to the Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens
 
Use the Image Quality Tool to create your own comparisons. Hint: Zooming your browser to a higher percent can make the differences clearer on some displays (Try CTRL+, CTRL- and CTRL-0 to reset). Share your thoughts in the comments section below this post.
 
B&H has significant quantities of the Canon EF 100-400mm L IS II USM Lens arriving regularly. Demand has been very high.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/18/2014 7:51:11 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, December 17, 2014
Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens
Just posted: Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens Review
 
Is the 24-105 STM a lens introduced before its primary purpose?
 
B&H has the Canon EF 24-105mm IS STM Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/17/2014 8:04:46 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, December 11, 2014
Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens on EOS 5D Mark III
If I had to limit my Canon full frame DSLR kit to only five lenses, they would be:
 
1. Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens
 
This lens has many uses, but I do a lot of landscape photography and regard this as the ultimate wide angle landscape lens. The angle of view this lens makes available ranges from ultra-wide through only modestly wide and it delivers very sharp (corner-to-corner) images that make me smile every time I view them.
 
2. Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens
 
The 24-70mm focal length range is my most-used and having a general purpose lens in my kit is important to me. There are some other good choices for this lens, including the 24-70 f/2.8L II and the 24-105 f/4L. If I had only 5 lenses in my kit, I would want my general purpose lens to have IS and the 24-70 f/4L IS has the most-recent/most advanced IS system at this time. This lens has a much higher maximum magnification spec (for macro capabilities) and less distortion at 24mm than the 24-105 L IS (which has a longer focal length range to its advantage). I can't do justice to a list of uses for this lens.
 
3. Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM Lens
 
The 70-200 f/2.8L IS II gets my easy choice for a medium telephoto zoom lens. It delivers very impressive image quality even at a wide open f/2.8 aperture with the capability to create a strong background blur. This lens excels at sports action and portrait photography. It is highly popular with photojournalists and wedding photographers. Landscape photography is another great use for this lens.
 
4. Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens
 
I love wildlife photography and there is no better general purpose wildlife lens than this one. This focal length range, moderately wide aperture and fast AF qualifies this lens for professional-grade sports photography. This is not a small, light or inexpensive lens, but ... I didn't set a budget limit for my "5 Lens Kit". :)
 
5. Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro Lens
 
I also love macro photography, for which interesting and colorful subjects abound. Macro subjects are readily available around the house, at the flower shop, outside ... there is never a lack of something to photograph with a macro lens in the kit. The Canon 100 L has very impressive image quality and the hybrid IS feature makes this lens easier to use and especially easier to frame at high magnification subject distances.
 
And then I would start saving to add the lenses I'd still feel lost without. :)
 
The above-listed lenses are my choices for use on a full-frame DSLR. For an APS-C DSLR model, I would swap #1 for the Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Lens and #2 for the Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens.
 
What are your most important "5"?
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/11/2014 10:06:49 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, December 10, 2014
Canon EOS Mode Dial
What is a Custom Mode?
 
A Custom mode is a camera setting that allows the photographer to instantly recall a pre-saved camera setup configuration by simply turning the top dial (or via a button press and dial turn on the 1-Series models) to one of the designated "C" modes.
 
Canon's mid and high-end EOS DSLR cameras have between one and three Custom ("C") modes available. The current EOS **D models (the EOS 70D and EOS 60D) have one Custom mode and the EOS 6D has two. Canon's high end models, including the EOS 7D Mark II, EOS 5D Mark III and EOS 1D X, have three "C" modes. The lower-end Rebel (***D and ****D) series cameras do not have custom modes available.
 
How to Configure a Custom Shooting Mode
 
Configuring a "C" mode is very easy. Simply adjust all of your camera settings as desired for the "C" mode being programmed and then find and select the "Custom shooting mode" menu option in the "Tools" tab. Next, select "Register settings". If more than one "C" mode is available on your camera, the mode number desired must then be selected. Done. That's it. That "C" mode is programmed.
 
Two other "Custom shooting mode" menu options are available. The first is "Clear settings". I don't recall ever using this one. I simply program over the top of an already configured "C" mode if I want to make a change. I haven't felt a need to clean up any no-longer-needed "C" mode.
 
The other available option is "Change Auto update set". While a "C" mode is being used, camera settings can be changed. When "Change Auto update set" is set to "Enabled", any camera setting changes made while in a "C" mode are saved to the respective "C" mode. The camera will retain the new settings even after being powered off. When this option is set to "Disabled", the camera will revert back to the originally programmed settings when the camera powers off. My cameras are all set to "Enabled". "Enabled" requires a little more attention to the as-last-configured settings when beginning to shoot, but ... I found "Disabled" to be somewhat maddening and requiring even more constant attention.
 
Bryan's Custom Mode Settings
 
I am generally using camera models with three Custom modes and I have a standard configuration that I use on all of my cameras. Being configured identically means that it doesn't matter which camera I am using, I know which Custom mode to use when the configured-for situation presents itself. That configuration and my thought process behind it as follows:
 
Custom Mode 1: Action Photography
 
The action photography I do has general overarching camera settings requirements that lend themselves perfectly to a "C" mode.
 
My most-used standard camera mode is "M" (Manual) and this is what I programmed "C1" for. I use "M" mode for about 95% of my photography with "Av" (Aperture Priority) mode picking up 4.8% of the remaining mode use (most often when shooting under rapidly changing light levels such as a partly-cloudy sky when Auto ISO in "M" mode is not desired). My programmed manual exposure settings include a wide open aperture (usually from whichever lens I used last), an action-stopping 1/1600 shutter speed and Auto ISO. If the light is constant, I change the ISO to a specific setting at the venue.
 
My "C1" is configured for AI Servo AF with a single AF point selected and the camera's highest speed burst drive mode selected. If shooting under very low light (such as an indoor gym), I select a slower/longer shutter speed to allow reasonable ISO settings to be used.
 
Having an action mode ready for immediately use has great benefits that include being able to properly photograph a running animal that was calmly feeding just moments before.
 
Custom Mode 2: Landscape and Still Life Photography
 
I am very frequently shooting landscape and still life subjects from a tripod and my typical settings for such photography are programmed into "C2". Once again, my selected exposure mode is "M". I generally leave the aperture set to f/11 (full frame) or f/8 (APS-C) to plan for as much depth of field as I can get without compromising sharpness (due to diffraction). The shutter speed I need varies widely when I'm in "C2" mode. It is usually set to whatever shutter speed I last used and usually needs to be set for the current situation. My "C2" ISO is set to 100 for the least noise possible.
 
I have One Shot AF mode selected along with the single center AF point. Key for ultimate image sharpness is that mirror lockup and the 2-sec self-timer are selected in my "C2". With the mirror automatically raising 2 seconds before the shutter release, all vibrations, including those caused by my shutter release button press, subside before image capture begins.
 
I usually have Long Exposure Noise Reduction enabled in "C2".
 
While "C" modes are great for setup speed, my "C2" needs are not usually happening fast. But, having this configuration readily available still saves me a lot of setup time. Convenience has a lot of value.
 
Custom Mode 3: Situational-Dependent
 
Basically, I leave "C" mode 3 unprogrammed until needed at each event venue. Technically, my "C3" is programmed to whatever settings I used it for last, but ... those settings are likely irrelevant to the new situation. My use for this mode varies greatly, but the overriding reason I setup "C3" is to be able to recall a venue-specific camera condition the instant I need it. I use "C3" more infrequently than "C1" and "C2" because my needs outside of the regular M and Av mode are primarily captured in my Mode 1 and 2 settings.
 
How are Your Custom Modes Programmed?
 
The variation of camera setup needs between photographers can be dramatic. Give thought to your own "C" settings.
Post Date: 12/10/2014 11:15:56 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, December 8, 2014
Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens
Just posted: Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens Review
 
If you have an APS-C/1.6x body, you are probably going to want to add this lens to your kit. The 24 STM is the excellent bargain we expected it to be.
 
B&H is accepting Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens preorders.
 
This lens is in stock at Adorama and the Canon Store.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/8/2014 7:43:34 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, November 24, 2014
Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera
The full Canon EOS 7D Mark II Review is now available.
 
This is an awesome camera – especially for the price. I decided to add a 7D II to my kit (replacing a 70D), so I expect to be adding more details to the review as time goes on, including more AI Servo AF experiences.
 
B&H has the Canon EOS 7D Mark II in stock.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 11/24/2014 8:02:52 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, November 20, 2014
Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens
Image quality results have been added to the Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens Review page.
 
If you are like me, the 24-105mm STM vs. L lens comparison is the one you are most interested in. I'll let you draw your own conclusions.
 
B&H has the Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 11/20/2014 11:27:25 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens
Image quality results have been added to the Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens Review page.
 
My expectation was for this lens to be a great bargain – similar to the nearly-identical Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Pancake Lens. If I directly compare these two lenses on the same camera body (with a very low sharpness setting), my initial impressions are that my expectations have been realized. You will see more distortion in the 24 (the barrel variety), but these two lenses are otherwise more similar than different in this comparison. That is a lot of image quality for a nicely-built pocket lens costing only $149.00.
 
Order your Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens now at B&H.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 11/19/2014 8:46:18 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Sigma 18-300mm DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary Lens
Image quality, vignetting and distortion test results along with specs, measurements and standard product images have been added to the Sigma 18-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary Lens Review page. More (on-camera) product images will be added within the next day or so).
 
B&H has the new Sigma 18-300mm DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary Lens in stock.
 
Looking for a great deal on a superzoom lens? There is a $200.00 instant rebate available on the Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM Lens. Regularly $549.00, this lens is currently only $349.00 at B&H.
Post Date: 11/18/2014 8:45:47 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, November 13, 2014
Canon EOS 7D Mark II's Wide Area AF
The large percentage of the viewfinder covered by Canon EOS 7D Mark II AF system is a big deal, at least when shooting in AI Servo AF mode and when there is no time to recompose after focusing. The image shared with this post shows such an example.
 
The horse gallops toward the camera at perhaps 35-40 mph (56-64 kph). I want the rider to be in focus, but the horse's ears and mane strongly compete for the top AF point's attention as the animal quickly moves up and down. Having an AF point so close to the border of the frame allows me to (better) avoid the AF point's attention moving from the rider to the horse.
 
Good examples of situations requiring a wide-positioned AF point include any sports that involve running (track, baseball, soccer, football, field hockey, etc.). When a person is running fast, they lean forward and the head leads the lean. If the subject's eyes are not in focus, the shot is likely a throw-away. To keep the runner's eyes in focus requires an AF point placed on them and at the oft-desired near-frame-filling distances, an AF point positioned close to the frame edge is required. The 7D II has you covered here.
 
Cameras with a lower percentage of the viewfinder covered by AF points require similar subjects to be captured from a longer distance and/or with a wider focal length, meaning cropping is required to achieve the same desired frame-filling result. Cropping of course reduces final image resolution. The Canon EOS 7D Mark II's wide area AF system has you covered in these situations, allowing you to fully utilize its 20.2 MP sensor – this capability is a big deal.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 11/13/2014 8:25:18 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
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