Canon & Nikon News and What's New (Excluding Deals) (Page 23) RSS Feed for Photography Deals Omitted Report News & Deals  ►

 Tuesday, January 12, 2016

 
Mitch Aunger of Planet5D noticed something odd in one of Nikon's official videos demonstrating the capabilities of their new flagship DSLR, the D5.
 
At around the 4:00 mark of My Nebraska ( seen above) you'll notice a time lapse showing the moon and the stars over Nebraska. The issue is that you can see stars passing over the shadow side of moon, which simply isn't possible. For that to be possible, those stars would have to be between the Earth and the moon.
 
Nebraska Time Lapse Screenshot

That means, most likely, two time lapses have been combined and layered for that particular sequence.
 
Of course, Nikon never prefaces the video by saying that it has been created with stills taken straight out of the camera. And we'd expect some minor editing to take place for a time lapse sequence such as the one shown. But as Mitch rightly asks,
"...how much post-processing is OK in a promotional video for a new camera?"
Should edits be taken so far as to defy the laws of physics when promoting the capabilities of a new camera?
 
Check out the full post over at Planet5D and then let us know – what do you think?
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/12/2016 1:48:52 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
With plentiful wildlife and beautiful scenery, Katmai National Park ranks very high on my list of favorite places to photograph.
 
In this photo, the large, bare, coarse-edged mountain peak, the more-gently sloping mid and lower elevations covered in green, and the various waters below, all being large in the frame, are obvious to the viewer. With a little more attention paid, a sow and her standing cub, concerned about the risk presented by the boar that is eyeing and potentially approaching them, come into view and give the photo that extra element I always like. Additional elements (and not as visible at this resolution) are the large number of salmon splashing their way up the stream in the foreground and a pair of brown bears on the distant shoreline.
 
The Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens was practically glued to one of my Canon EOS 5Ds R bodies while in Katmai NP and a great complement to my big lens, the Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II. The 100-400 L II, with its long focal length range, can capture wildlife images ranging from environmental portraits to close-ups, depending on the subject distance of course. That 100mm was nearly too long to frame 1,000+ lb brown bears at times was ... a very exciting part of this trip.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook, Instagram and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
142mm  f/9.0  1/320s
ISO 200
5792 x 8688px
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/12/2016 12:17:46 PM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
From the Guinness World Records YouTube Channel:
 
A spectacular display of drone technology by Intel Corporation (USA) involving 100 small aircrafts being launched skywards in formation has earned a new world record title for the Most Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) airborne simultaneously. Read the full story Read the full story here.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/12/2016 11:02:26 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
As I was creating yesterday's post about the New York Public Library releasing 180,000 images into the public domain, I began thinking of ways in which the wide range of images could be used.
 
With a primary interest in portraiture, the first idea that came to my mind was incorporating one of the public domain images in a portrait simulating a multiple exposure. With that in mind, I picked up my 5D Mark III and favorite portrait lens – the 85L II – and captured a profile of Amanda lit with a 580EX flash diffused by a small soft box positioned in front of (and slightly behind) her and another flash pointed at the background. This left me with a significant portion of Amanda's profile in shadow, meaning that I could use a public domain image set to a Lighten blending mode in Photoshop CC to easily blend the two images.
 
After cleaning up the background (making sure it was completely white) and a few adjustments (including a Black and White adjustment layer), the base image looked like this:
 
Profile Portrait with Public Domain Image Base

For the overlay, I settled on an image in the public domain library that seemed to indicate that the wheels were turning in the subject's head. I thought this overlay image would work well because with the subject's eyes looking to the right, she looks as if she's thinking about something.
 
New York Public Library Public Domain Image no. 1691644

I adjusted the brightness and contrast of the overlay layer in order to obtain an optimal balance with the base portrait (a matter of taste, of course) and placed the overlay below the same Black and White adjustment layer so that the adjustment applied to both images. The final composite can be seen above and the full resolution image can be found on my Flickr photostream.
 
Do you plan on using public domain images in your work? If so, let us know how in the comments.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/12/2016 8:30:18 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Sample pictures have been added to the Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens Review.
 
These sample pictures are primarily showing the background blur this lens is capable of creating at f/1.4 along with angle of view examples.
 
B&H has the Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/12/2016 8:18:06 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, January 11, 2016
The New York Public library recently released 180,000 of its digital scans into the public domain. The works include manuscripts, sheet music, stereoscopic photographs as well as maps that are free to use for any purpose.
 
These images should be especially useful to those photographers who like to combine and overlay images for graphic art or illustration purposes. A rather interesting tool for browsing the images can be found here. [Sean]
 
From the New York Public Library Blog:
 
Today we are proud to announce that out-of-copyright materials in NYPL Digital Collections are now available as high-resolution downloads. No permission required, no hoops to jump through: just go forth and reuse!
 
The release of more than 180,000 digitized items represents both a simplification and an enhancement of digital access to a trove of unique and rare materials: a removal of administration fees and processes from public domain content, and also improvements to interfaces — popular and technical — to the digital assets themselves. Online users of the NYPL Digital Collections website will find more prominent download links and filters highlighting restriction-free content; while more technically inclined users will also benefit from updates to the Digital Collections API enabling bulk use and analysis, as well as data exports and utilities posted to NYPL's GitHub account. These changes are intended to facilitate sharing, research and reuse by scholars, artists, educators, technologists, publishers, and Internet users of all kinds. All subsequently digitized public domain collections will be made available in the same way, joining a growing repository of open materials.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/11/2016 2:08:34 PM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
From the Nikon Europe YouTube Channel:
 
The wait is over. The Nikon D500, our latest DX-format flagship is here! A class-leading DX-format digital SLR camera that condenses the power of an FX-format Digital SLR into DX-format agility with always-on connectivity & powerful 153-point AF system and much more.
 
D500 Primary features
 
  • Powerful 153-point AF achieves superior subject acquisition performance across a wide range of situations
  • High-speed continuous shooting at approx. 10 fps for up to 200 shots (14-bit lossless compressed RAW)
  • Unique benefits of a compact DX system — added agility in telephoto shooting
  • 4K UHD video, suitable for professional productions
  • New EXPEED 5 image-processing engine achieves sensitivity up to ISO 51200, expandable to Hi 5 (equivalent to ISO 1640000).
  • Touch-screen, tilting 8-cm/3.2-in. high-resolution monitor ensures more comfortable shooting for professionals and advanced amateurs.
  • SnapBridge support lets you link with a smart device via Bluetooth and Wi-Fi
  • WT-7/A/B/C Wireless Transmitter (optional) enables high-speed wired/wireless LAN communication
B&H has the Nikon D500 DSLR Camera and MB-D17 Battery Grip available for preorder.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 1/11/2016 1:31:27 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Photoshelter:
 
Ready to make 2016 your best year yet?
 
The 2016 Photo Business Plan Workbook is a step-by-step guide to help you create a strong business plan, target the clients you want, and make more money this year.
 
Inside the workbook, get strategies and examples to help you:
 
  • Define your products & services
  • Determine your audience and addressable market
  • Create a marketing plan
  • Fix your finances
  • Tune-up your website
  • Build your Search Engine Optimization
  • Get social
  • Create an advisory group
  • Follow up with old clients
Build your photo business plan and stick to it this year. Get started with these smart business tips packed into an easy-to-read workbook.
 
Download your copy of the The 2016 Photo Business Plan Workbook today!
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/11/2016 12:14:16 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Image quality results from the EOS 7D Mark II have been added to the Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens Review.
 
The focal length range is great.
 
B&H has the Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/11/2016 8:28:51 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
According to the Egami Blog, Sigma has filed a patent for a 120-600mm f/5-6.3 optical design which could indicate that the current 150-600mm Sports and/or Contemporary models may receive an even larger focal range when replaced.
 
Description of Patent
 
Patent Publication No. 2015-203827
 
  • Published 2015.11.16
  • Filing date 2014.4.16
Example:
 
  • Zoom ratio 4.66
  • Focal length 125.15 250.18 583.80
  • F number 4.86 5.84 6.50
  • Total angle of view 2? 19.47 9.76 4.18
  • The image height Y 21.63
  • Overall length of the lens 314.20 371.31 424.96
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/11/2016 5:25:47 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, January 8, 2016
While attempting a few macro shots yesterday, I was inspired to turn my lens on a subject that has always fascinated me because of its intrinsic beauty and complexity – the eye.
 
Gear Used
 
EXIF: f/10, 1/80 sec, ISO 320
 
Thought Process and Execution
 
As I wanted a macro shot of the eye, my lens choice was easy. However, as I wanted to get as much magnification as possible, I stacked all three of the Kenko Extension Tubes behind the lens. This shortened the minimum focus distance allowing me to get even closer to the subject for a larger than 1.0x maximum magnification.
 
How much larger? Well, let's see.
 
With the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM...
 
Update: I revised this section to make the calculation simpler.
 
Magnification = Native Maximum Magnification + (Extension Length / Focal Length)
Magnification = 1.0 + [(12 + 20 + 36) / 100]
Magnification = 1.0 + [68 / 100]
Magnification = 1.0 + .68
Magnification = 1.68
 
Note that the magnification value assumes we are working at Minimum Focus Distance.
 
Another factor we need to consider is the effective aperture in this scenario. As magnification increases, the effective aperture gets narrower. Here's how the effective aperture is calculated:
 
Effective Aperture = Aperture Setting + (Aperture Setting * Magnification)
Effective Aperture = 10 + (10 * 1.68)
Effective Aperture = 10 + 16.8
Effective Aperture = f/26.8
 
Working with this kind of magnification brings with it a couple of challenges. One challenge is that your depth of field becomes very thin. Even at f/10, there's only a sliver of the image that's in focus (the reflection of the top eyelashes). And on top of that, a higher than 1.0x magnification makes the viewfinder very dark. Minimal DOF combined with a dark viewfinder makes precise focusing a challenge to achieve.
 
And because of the very narrow effective aperture, a lot of light is needed for a proper exposure. In this case, I used a manually controlled, shoe-mounted Canon 580EX set to nearly full power (at ISO 320) in order to obtain a decent exposure. Of course, the RoundFlash Ringflash Adapter I was using resulted in a certain amount of light loss from diffusion, but I felt it was the best modifier for the look I was going for and well worth the penalty of a slightly higher ISO.
 
As far as the shutter speed goes, there was no specific reason I chose 1/80 second over anything else. In this particular instance, any reasonably fast shutter speed would work (even one that would likely show motion blur during at normal magnifications). That's because the light captured in this scene is provided entirely from the flash which has an extremely short duration. In effect, the shutter speed was the flash duration.
 
I typically use a tripod when shooting macro subjects. But in this case, using a tripod seemed a bit impractical. That's because with such a small DOF, I thought it would be easier for me to adjust the camera back and forth slightly to achieve focus rather than try and direct the subject to move her head the same amount. I also typically use 10x Live View to aid in manual focusing when shooting macro subjects. But in this case, using 10x (or 5x) Live View would have had two big consequences: the inability to see the entire framing and a loss of stability needed for precise manual focusing (as my eye would not be on the viewfinder).
 
I overcame focus challenges by sitting on the coffee table in front of the subject and bracing my elbows against my knees with the camera pressed firmly to my face. This gave me a relatively rigid platform where I could sway ever so slightly forward and backward as the subject stared straight into the lens. This also allowed me the ability to easily adjust framing on the fly for slightly different looks between shots. I concentrated on timing my shots when the reflection of her top eyelashes looked sharpest (a challenge with the dark viewfinder, but not impossible). After several attempts, I finally had the framing and focus that I wanted.
 
In post-processing, I increased clarity to help bring out details in the iris, upped the saturation a little and made relatively minor adjustments to brightness/contrast. The image is uncropped.
 
You can find a full resolution version on my Flickr photostream.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/8/2016 8:58:49 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Many of the instant & mail-in rebates from Canon, Sigma, Tamron and Tokina that we enjoyed in December have been extended through January (and in Sigma and Tamron's case, extended through February).
 
The Canon rebates changed a bit from the previous period. Several of the lens rebates are lower than they were this holiday season while a few lenses (and Speedlites) no longer qualify. On the DSLR side of things, the 5Ds and 5Ds R no longer feature an instant rebate.
 
As usual, Canon DSLR rebates vary depending on bundled lenses.
 
Update: I have just been notified that the Sigma 150-600mm Sports and Contemporary instant rebates were extended through Jan 31. I have updated the table accordingly.
 
Canon, Sigma, Tamron & Tokina Rebates
 
ModelRebate Amount
Canon EOS 1D X Buy$700.00
Canon EOS 5D Mark III Buy$300.00
Canon EOS 6D Buy$300.00 / $550.00
Canon EOS 7D Mark II Buy$300.00 / $550.00
Canon EOS 70D Buy$200.00 - $550.00
Canon EOS Rebel T6s / 760D Buy$150.00 - $300.00
Canon EOS Rebel T6i / 750D Buy$150.00 - $350.00
Canon EOS Rebel T5i / 700D Buy$150.00 - $350.00
Canon EOS Rebel T5 / 1200D Buy$150.00 - $300.00
Canon EOS Rebel SL1 / 100D Buy$150.00 - $350.00
Canon EOS M3 Buy$200.00 - $550.00
Canon EOS M10 Buy$100.00 - $120.00
Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Lens Buy$100.00
Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens Buy$100.00
Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens Buy$150.00
Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM Lens Buy$100.00
Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM Lens Buy$100.00
Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens Buy$100.00
Canon EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens Buy$100.00
Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro Lens Buy$50.00
Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro Lens Buy$50.00
Canon Speedlite 600EX-RT Flash Buy$80.00
Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM Lens Buy$200.00
Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 EX DC OS HSM Lens Buy$250.00
Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM Buy$200.00
Sigma 50-500mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Lens Buy$150.00
Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Lens Buy$250.00
Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro Lens Buy$300.00
Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens Buy$200.00
Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM C Lens Buy$100.00
Tamron 16-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Lens Buy$130.00
Tamron 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Lens Buy$50.00
Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Lens Buy$100.00
Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di VC PZD Lens Buy$100.00
Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Lens Buy$100.00
Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD Lens Buy$100.00
Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lens Buy$120.00
Tamron 90mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Macro Lens Buy$150.00
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro DX II Lens Buy$30.00
Tokina 11-20mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro DX Lens Buy$50.00
Tokina 16-28mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro FX Lens Buy$40.00
Tokina 100mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro Macro Lens Buy$40.00
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/8/2016 7:28:44 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
According to the Egami Blog, Canon has filed a patent for an EF-M 55-300mm f/4.5-6.3 DO IS STM.
 
Patent Description
 
Patent Publication No. 2015-232674
 
  • Published 2015.12.24
  • Filing date 2014.6.11
Example 1
 
  • Zoom ratio 5.27
  • Focal length 55.04 135.00 290.01
  • F-number 4.60 5.18 6.30
  • Angle of view 13.94 5.78 2.70
  • Image height 13.66 13.66 13.66
  • Overall length of the lens 136.00 175.46 192.00
  • BF 35.50 35.50 35.50
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 1/8/2016 5:24:12 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, January 7, 2016
Our friends at MindShift Gear just released what might be the three lightest weight outdoor photography backpacks ever (the new UltraLight Single 16L backpack weighs in at a slim 1.9 pounds, including rain cover). The UltraLight Sprint 16L, UltraLight Dual 25L, and UltraLight Dual 36L side-panel designs allow quick access to cameras, lenses, and accessories without having to take off the bag.
 
The backpacks also offer generous space for personal belongings, zippered storage, a hydration reservoir and electronics. Additional features include an integrated tripod mounting system and highly breathable shoulder straps. The UltraLight Dual 25L and UltraLight Dual 36L include a removable camera compartment and shoulder strap that can be worn separately when you wish to drop your full pack and set off with even less weight.
 
From MindShift Gear:
 
SANTA ROSA, CALIF – Outdoor photographers can now go faster and farther with what may be the lightest photo daypacks ever: The UltraLight series from MindShift Gear. The UltraLight Sprint 16L, UltraLight Dual 25L, and UltraLight Dual 36L side-panel designs allow quick access to cameras, lenses, and accessories without first having to take off the bag. The backpacks also offer generous space for personal belongings, zippered storage, a hydration reservoir and electronics. Additional features include an integrated tripod mounting system and highly breathable shoulder straps.
 
The UltraLight Dual 25L and UltraLight Dual 36L also include a removable camera compartment and shoulder strap that can be worn separately when users wish to drop their full pack and bag a peak with even less weight.
 
“All aspects of the UltraLight backpacks were refined with weight in mind, including lightweight fabric, thinner webbing, lighter buckles, and shoulder straps with less padding,” said Doug Murdoch, MindShift Gear’s CEO and lead designer. “This allows the outdoor enthusiast to be able to go farther and faster as they are not weighed down by their pack.”
 
GEAR CAPACITY
 
UltraLight Sprint 16L:
 
  • Holds one large (un-gripped) Mirrorless body and one to two standard zoom lenses, or primes
  • Holds one compact DSLR (Rebel, 3300 or 5300 series) and one to two lenses
  • Fits up to a 10” tablet or most 1.5 liter hydration reservoirs
  • Nine liters of capacity for personal gear
  • Maximum lens size: 24-70mm f/2.8 attached to a DSLR body
UltraLight Dual 25L:
 
  • Holds one standard-size DSLR (5DM3 or D810) and one standard zoom lens or two primes
  • Holds one large (un-gripped) Mirrorless body and two to three lenses
  • Fits up to a 15” laptop or most 2.5 liter hydration reservoirs
  • Fourteen liters of capacity for personal gear
  • Maximum lens size: 24-70mm f/2.8 attached to a DSLR body
UltraLight Dual 36L:
 
  • Holds one standard-size DSLR (5DM3 or D810) and two to four standard zoom lenses
  • Holds one gripped DSLRs (1Dx or D4s) and two to three standard zoom lenses
  • Fits up to a 15” laptop or most three liter hydration reservoirs
  • Twenty liters of capacity for personal gear
  • Maximum lens size: 24-70mm f/2.8 attached to body with 70-200 f/2.8 detached
MATERIALS
 
Exterior: For superior water resistance, all exterior fabric has a durable water-repellant coating, plus the underside of the fabric has a polyurethane coating. It also has high-quality YKK Fuse zippers, 100D nylon shadow rip-stop, 420D high-density nylon, 210D velocity nylon, 320G UltraStretch mesh, 350G airmesh, nylon webbing, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
 
Interior: 200D poly, velex, high-density closed-cell foam, belly-o mesh, 3-ply bonded nylon thread.
 
PRODUCT DIMENSIONS, VOLUME & WEIGHT
 
UltraLight Sprint 16L
External Dimensions: (25 x 47 x 15 cm)
Camera Compartment: (24 x 14 x 12 cm)
Tablet/hydration compartment: (24.5 x 27 cm)
Volume: 16 liters
Weight: 1.9lbs (includes rain cover)
 
UltraLight Dual 25L
External Dimensions: (26 x 55 x 17 cm)
Camera Compartment: (23 cm x 19 cm x 13 cm)
Laptop/hydration compartment: (26 x 40 cm) W x H
Volume: 25 liters
Weight: 2.8 lbs (includes rain cover, removable shoulder strap, removable camera compartment)
 
UltraLight Dual 36L
External Dimension: (28 x 60 x 22 cm)
Camera Compartment: (25 X 25 X 16.5cm)
Laptop/hydration compartment: (26.5 x 49cm) W x H
Volume: 36 liters
Weight: 3.3 lbs (includes rain cover, removable shoulder strap, removable camera compartment)
 
MindShift Gear has the Ultralight Sprint 16L, Dual 25L and Dual 36L daypacks in stock.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/7/2016 3:10:35 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Pittsburgh, home to three rivers (Ohio, Alleghany and Monongahela), is also home to great reflections and many bridges. The reflections of the city, however, are usually color blurs due to wakes from boat and barge traffic. Thanks to the wave-rebounding solid vertical river walls, the waves seem to never dissipate and when planning this long daytrip, I was visualizing a creamy-smooth river of color during the blue hour and later. What I found on this day was ... no boat traffic and very different images than I had visualized. Different in a good way, I think.
 
The most difficult part of this image capture? Being there.
 
To take the actual picture, I simply stood on the north shore of the Three Rivers Heritage Trail river walk, centered between the Robert Clemente and Andy Warhol bridges, set the aperture to f/16 to get the star burst effect from lights, adjusted the framing to level (both pitch and yaw to keep the buildings and their reflections vertically straight) and pressed the shutter release (mirror lockup with 1 second delay).
 
The RAW file post processing was not challenging. In DPP, highlights were reduced (-5), shadows were boosted (+5) and saturation was added. While this result was very good, I opted to brighten the reflection in the water slightly (1/3 stop) using a simple HDR process. Two 16-bit TIFF files were created (one at -.83 EV and one at -.5 EV) and combined in Photoshop.
 
Being in Pittsburgh for the day meant renting a car the night before (4 drivers with 2 cars is not working so well), driving 4 hours, hiking roughly 3 miles with a full MindShift Gear BackLight 26L (including two tripods, extra cloths, food and water) and overall, being outdoors for 9 hours with temperatures in the teens and twenties (°F). I arrived home at 2:30 AM and got up to return the car in the AM.
 
The beauty of our brains is that, in a few days, the only thing I will remember is having spent a great day in a beautiful city and the images will last for a lifetime. I'm ready to go back.
 
Another beauty is the Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens that I was "focused" on for the day. I referred to this lens as a "scapes" lens and it performed excellently in its cityscapes roll this day.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, Facebook, Instagram and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 1/7/2016 12:52:27 PM CT   Posted By: Bryan
    1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 |    
Canon News, Nikon News Archives
2016   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May
2015   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2014   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2013   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2012   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2011   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2010   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2009   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2008   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2007   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2006   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
2005   Jan   Feb   Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov   Dec
Feedback
Help  |  © 2003-2016 The Digital Picture, LLC  |  Bryan CarnathanPowered By Christ!