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 Wednesday, October 12, 2016
Image quality results have been added to the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens page.
 
The MTF charts predicted good things in regards to 16-35 L III image quality and I think you will find that expectation delivered.
 
First, let's compare apples to apples: Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III vs. II lens comparison. The III simply blows the II out of the water and clearly remains the better lens even at f/5.6.
 
The Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens has become renowned for its performance. Simply equaling the image quality of this lens would have been a big deal. Surpassing this lens' sharpness with a 1-stop wider aperture (clearly so at 16mm) was not what I expected.
 
How does the Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L III compare to the Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 VC Lens? This comparison requires some visualization as the EOS 5Ds R did not exist when we tested the Tamron, but I see the Canon being the clear winner at the two focal length range extents.
 
B&H has the new Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens in stock.
 
This lens is also in stock at:
 
Adorama | Amazon (3rd parties) | Beach Camera | BuyDig.com | Canon Store | eBay | WEX Photographic
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 10/12/2016 8:56:01 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, October 11, 2016
A pair of new 16-35 f/2.8L III lenses arrived yesterday and they are of course receiving our highest priority right now (image quality results coming very soon). First up are the standard product images now available on the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens page.
 
As shown in the lead image, the 16-35 f/2.8L III, shown immediately to the right of the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Lens, has obviously grown modestly larger than the II and has received noticeable aesthetic improvements. The next lens to the right, the Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens, shows similar updates from the lens most-considered its predecessor, the Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Lens. As shown in the image below, the oversized hoods of the older two lenses have been significantly reduced in size, a major improvement in my opinion.
 
Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens Compared to Similar Lenses with Hoods
 
Using the site's Lens Product Images Comparison Tool, the new 16-35 L III can be visually compared to most other current and recently discontinued lenses. I have preloaded that link with a comparison you may find interesting.
 
B&H has the new Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens in stock. Also in stock at: Adorama | WEX Photographic
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 10/11/2016 9:16:37 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, October 10, 2016
Image quality results from the Canon EOS 5Ds R have been added to the Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 Lens Review page.
 
I was more than a little surprised to see such a big-hit lens being replaced less than 3 years after it was introduced, but I was traveling when the G2 version lens was first announced and didn't have time to figure out why the replacement was coming. I quickly put the lens on the to-test list and would have to figure out the "Why?" question later. Well, "later" is now.
 
The new lens arrived and as usual, photographing it was my first priority, while it was still in pristine, dust-free condition. The new exterior design, being very modern in appearance, is very pleasing both to the eye and to the touch, but my first surprise was how extremely tight the zoom ring was. Midway through the photo session, I by-accident discovered the push/pull zoom ring lock feature (mentioned in the press release of course). Pulling back on the zoom ring made a huge, positive difference. I think I'm going to like this feature.
 
While my anticipation for the updated design was strong, I was most anxious to see the image quality results from this lens. While the Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 Lens' MTF charts appear nearly identical to the original Tamron 150-600 VC's charts, these lenses do not share an identical optical design. The biggest clue to this difference is the lenses/groups count of 21/13 vs. 20/13 in the older lens along with the improved minimum focus distance. Of course, what matters most is real world performance and that is what we are looking at today.
 
The ultra-high resolution EOS 5Ds R was not available when the original 150-600 hit the streets, but I wanted the 150-600 VC G2 results from the highest resolution camera, so one needs to use some visualization skills to compare the Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 Lens with its predecessor. My initial thought was that the older lens performed slightly better, but comparing again with fresh eyes shows the two lenses being nearly identical as hinted to by their MTF charts. I do see a slight G2 advantage in the 600mm comparison, easily the weakest focal length for the original lens.
 
Simply being compatible with extenders is a G2 advantage. I have to admit not being very optimistic about the extender feature for this lens, even though they are (at least for now) dedicated models. My low expectations were in part due to the soft performance of the original lens at 600mm, the focal length that extenders would most often be needed at. And, I have to admit being modestly impressed with the 840mm results. Although the max aperture is a narrow f/9, resulting image degradation is slightly below my expectations.
 
The 300-1200mm focal length range created by the 2x extender is very impressive. The image quality at 1200mm is not so impressive. Nor is the f/13 maximum aperture and the dark viewfinder that it brings.
 
Comparing the Tamron 150-600mm VC G2 Lens to the Canon 100-400mm L IS II Lens is interesting. Compare the Canon-with-1.4x to the Tamron also (remember to select the same apertures).
 
B&H has the Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 10/10/2016 9:47:16 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, October 7, 2016
I love to photograph a bit of everything and especially try to use gear in the situations it is best suited for during evaluations. This use also gains me invaluable experience. But, if required to choose what I consider my three primary subjects, landscapes/cityscapes, wildlife and sports would comprise my list. These are subjects that both interest me and are frequently available to me. You likely care less about my photography than the reviews I create and to that purpose, my primary subjects also tend to challenge camera gear. Wildlife is most frequently found in low light, athletes are often moving very fast (and erratically) and landscapes readily show any lens aberrations. That a wide range of weather conditions encountered during these outdoor activities is helpful (for evaluations).
 
Since evaluating the Canon EOS 5Ds and 5Ds R, the 5Ds R has become my primary camera model. I fell in love with the 50.6 MP resolution along with the rest of the package including the great AF system. I have two of these cameras in my kit and a third spends most of its time in the lab testing lenses.
 
While the 5Ds R is an incredible camera, its max frame rate is not so impressive. Of the three categories I listed above, "sports" (and sometimes wildlife) imagery can be substantially improved with a fast frame rate and I am blessed to also have a Canon EOS-1D X Mark II in the kit to handle those scenarios.
 
I'm always looking to improve my kit and a new, great-performing full frame EOS camera model, such as the 5D Mark IV, always garners my attention. So, the "Am I going to keep this camera?" was an ever-present question to myself while reviewing the 5D IV.
 
The short answer is "No", or at least "Not now", but listen to my reasoning.
 
First, here are some of my personally-important 5D Mark IV vs. 5Ds differentiators:

  1. 30.4 (6720 x 4480) vs. 50.6 (8688 x 5792) megapixels
  2. 7 fps vs. 5 fps
  3. Built-in GPS, Wi-Fi and NFC vs. optional accessories
  4. Improved AF system with better f/8 max aperture support (61 pts vs. 5 pts)
  5. AF at EV -3 vs. EV -2
  6. ISO 32000 vs ISO 6400 (extended 102400 vs. 12800)
  7. Touch screen 3.2" (8.10cm) Clear View LCD II, approx. 1620K dots vs. non-Touch 3.2" (8.11cm) Clear View II, approx. 1040K dots
  8. Dual Pixel CMOS Live View/Video continuous AF vs. contrast detection AF
  9. 4k, 1080p 60 fps, 720p 120 fps with no 4GB file limit using exFAT CF card plus other advantages vs. 1080p 30fps, 720p 60 fps
  10. 28.2 oz (800g) vs. 32.8 oz (930g)
  11. Requires 2-second self-timer for mirror lockup delay options vs. has 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, one or two second delay optionally selectable

Check out the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV vs. 5Ds specification comparison to fully compare these cameras.
 
The first option on the above list represents one of only two 5Ds R advantages listed. But, it is a major one. All other things being equal, a 50.6 MP image has significantly higher resolution than a 30.4 MP image. Here is a resolution test chart comparison between the 5D IV and the 5Ds R. The 5Ds R, with it low-pass cancellation filter, delivers incredible detail, bringing fur, feathers, hair, foliage, eye lashes, etc. to life. With APS-C-level pixel density, this imaging sensor provides plenty of headroom for cropping when needed, adding "reach" to inadequately-long focal lengths, with adequate-for-many-purposes resolution remaining.
 
The second difference listed above is very tempting to me as the difference between 5 and 7 fps is quite noticeable. But, that is where my 1D X Mark II takes over. The 1D X II's 14 fps is twice as good as 7 fps, though I give up resolution in this trade-off.
 
List item #3, GPS and Wi-Fi, was only a minor differentiator for me. The Canon W-E1 Wi-Fi Adapter will give my 5Ds R the Wi-Fi capability and I've not yet found a strong need for the GPS coordinates in my EXIF.
 
An improved AF system, including lower light performance, is always important to me (an out of focus image usually heads straight to the recycle/trash bin) and the expanded AF point coverage area is definitely a 5D IV benefit for my wildlife and sports photography. While the 5D IV's f/8 AF advantages are really nice, I do not frequently use the lens plus extender combinations that make use of this feature.
 
Having higher ISO settings available is definitely an advantage, but only if the noise levels are acceptable for the intended purpose of the image. As hinted to by the higher standard max ISO setting, the 5D IV delivers lower high ISO noise levels than the 5Ds R. In general, you can have low noise or high resolution. Technology continues to bring us improvements in this compromise and the the 5D IV performs better than the 5Ds in this regard at the pixel level. Better, but not close to as much better as the max available ISO settings may indicate. Downsize the 5Ds image to 5D IV dimensions and the comparison becomes considerably closer. The 5D IV is still the better performer, but the equivalent resolution comparison shows this attribute being less of a decision factor.
 
While I continue to make increasing use of Canon's touch screen LCDs, they are not yet a must-have feature for me. That the 5D IV has this feature is an advantage, but ... this is not yet a decision maker for me.
 
The Dual Pixel AF feature is an important advantage for the IV, but ... my 1D X II has this feature when I need it. Same with the 4k video feature.
 
The 5D IV's weight is an advantage, but the amount of difference was not enough to "weigh" in on my personal decision.
 
While the last option on this list, mirror lockup delay, may seem minor, I use it constantly and it saves me time in the field.
 
While price is often a differentiator between camera models, there is a relatively small difference between these two. That I already owned the 5Ds R was a disadvantage to the 5D IV in this scenario and the budget wasn't open to an additional camera joining the kit at this time.
 
In the end, it was the resolution that compelled me to stay the course with the 5Ds R bodies. I love reviewing images with incredible detail, especially when I work really hard to get something special. I love to be able to print huge. I love to be able to crop when I fine tune (change my mind) later, when I was focal length limited or when I needed to choose less-than-ideal framing to hold a focus point on a subject in motion. Perhaps most important is that when evaluating lenses, I want to see any aberrations present as clearly as possible and I want to know if the lenses are up to use on a camera of this resolution.
 
Everyone's criteria for camera selection is not the same. You must make the decision that is right for you. If the resolution advantage is unimportant to you, the answer is easy – get the 5D IV. It is an incredible camera and a great upgrade from most other models in many respects.
 
The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV is available at B&H Photo | Adorama | Amazon | Wex Photographic
 
You may also be interested in:
 
Should I get the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV or the 5D Mark III?
Should I get the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV or the 5Ds/5Ds R?

Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 10/7/2016 9:32:05 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, October 5, 2016
Just posted: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Review.
 
Let me know if I missed anything important to you.
 
B&H has the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV in stock.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 10/5/2016 9:29:08 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, September 16, 2016
We've added the Canon EOS M5 to our Camera Specifications Tool.
 
I preloaded the link above with a comparison of the M5 and Canon's previous mirrorless offering, the M3.
 
You can preorder the EOS M5 at these retailers.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 9/16/2016 11:56:13 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, September 15, 2016
As usual, I have assembled my expectations for Canon's newly announced lens in the Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM Review page.
 
With a new optical design, versatile focal length range, 4-stop IS, Canon's nano USM focusing technology and an economical price tag, this lens will surely find a home in many photographers' kits.
 
You can preorder the Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM at these retailers.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 9/15/2016 9:02:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Monday, September 12, 2016
I was not in the habit of sharing my camera setup steps when initially receiving the Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR camera, but by request, I'm sharing them with you now. Here are the 37 steps to how I setup my Canon EOS 5D Mark III.
 
  1. Open the box, find the battery and charger and plug it in. If you have another charged LP-E6/LP-E6N battery available, you can continue to the battery-required steps without a wait. Or, the supplied battery may have enough charge to take you through these steps if you can't wait.
  2. While the battery is charging, unpack the other items you want from the box. For me, this is primarily the camera, the eye cup, the neck strap and the Canon Solution Disk.
  3. Download and install the latest Canon EOS Solution Disk software on your computer to get support for the latest camera(s). Canon Digital Photo Pro (DPP), EOS Utility, Photostitch and Lens Registration Utility are the options I manually include in the install.
  4. Attach the neck strap.
  5. Insert a sufficiently charged battery.
  6. Power the camera on.
  7. The date and time setup screen will show at startup the first time. Use the Rear Control dial and the Set button to update this information.
  8. Insert one (or two) memory card(s) (format them via the tools menu option before taking pictures).
  9. Set the camera's mode to Av, Tv or M (some modes provide only a small subset of available menu options).
  10. Scroll through all of the menu tabs to configure the cameras as follows:
  11. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Image quality: Use top dial to set RAW to "RAW" and Rear Control dial to set JPEG to "-"
  12. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Image review: 4 sec.
  13. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Beep: Disable
  14. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Release without card: Disable/off (I highly recommend this setting)
  15. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Lens aberration correction: All disabled (though I suggest leaving CA correction enabled for most uses - all can be applied to a RAW file in DPP)
  16. Shooting Menu, Tab 2: ISO Speed Settings: ISO Speed range: L(50)-H1(51200), Auto ISO Speed range: 100-25600
  17. Shooting Menu, Tab 2: Auto Lighting Optimizer: Disabled
  18. Shooting Menu, Tab 3: Picture Style: Neutral with Sharpness Strength set to "1" (Note: the low contrast "Neutral" picture style provides a histogram on the back of the camera that most-accurately shows me blown highlights and blocked shadows on the camera LCD. I usually change the Picture Style to "Standard" in DPP after capture.)
  19. Shooting Menu, Tab 3: Long exposure noise reduction: I usually have this option set to "Auto", but my choice varies for the situation.
  20. Shooting Menu, Tab 3: High ISO speed noise reduction: Off (noise reduction is destructive to image details - I prefer to add NR sparingly in post)
  21. AF Menu, Tab 2: AI Servo 1st image priority: Focus priority (I want the images in focus more than I want the time-priority capture)
  22. AF Menu, Tab 2: AI Servo 2nd image priority: Focus priority +2 (same reason)
  23. AF Menu, Tab 3: One-Shot AF release priority: Focus priority (same reason)
  24. AF Menu, Tab 4: Orientation linked AF point: Separate AF pts: Area + pt
  25. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Highlight alert: Enable (flash portions of images that are overexposed)
  26. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Histogram disp: RGB (I want to monitor all three color channels for blown or blocked pixels)
  27. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Magnification (apx): Actual size (from selected AF point)
  28. Setup Menu, Tab 1: Auto rotate: On/Computer only (this provides the largest playback image size on the camera LCD)
  29. Setup Menu, Tab 2: VF grid display: Enable
  30. Setup Menu, Tab 3: Info button display options: Electronic level only
  31. Setup Menu, Tab 4: Custom shooting mode (C1-C3): Auto update set: Enable (see also: Configuring Custom Shooting Modes)
  32. Setup Menu, Tab 4: Copyright information: Type name as desired
  33. Custom Functions, Tab 1: Bracketing auto cancel: [Off] selected
  34. Custom Functions, Tab 2: Custom Controls: Set: Playback; Multicontroller: Direct AF point selection; Default erase option: [Erase] selected
  35. Custom Functions, Tab 3: Default erase option: [Erase] selected
  36. My Menu: Register the following options: Long exposure noise reduction, Mirror lockup, Format card, Date/Time/Zone (great for monitoring what time it is), Sensor cleaning, Expo.comp./AEB
  37. Mount a lens, focus on a subject and adjust the viewfinder diopter (if necessary)
I of course make other menu and setting changes based on current shooting scenarios, but this list covers my initial camera setup process.
 
To copy this configuration would mean that you intend to shoot similar to how I shoot – including shooting in RAW-only format. While my setup works great for me, your best use of this list may be for tweaking your own setup.
 
If you can't remember your own menu setup parameters, keeping an up-to-date list such as this one is a good idea. Anytime your camera goes in for a service visit, the camera will be returned in a reset-to-factory state (unless you request otherwise). Your list will ensure that you do not miss an important setting when putting the camera back into service.
 
More Information
 
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 9/12/2016 10:17:32 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, September 9, 2016
The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV has arrived and one of the first tasks was to evaluate the frame rate and buffer depth performance. I thought I would share these results with you today.
 
To test the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV's 7 fps drive mode and 17/21 (21 with UDMA 7 CF card) frame RAW file buffer specs, the camera was configured to use ISO 100, a 1/8000 shutter speed (no waiting for the shutter operation), a wide open aperture (no time lost due to aperture blades closing) and manual focus (no focus lock delay). The lens cap remained on (insuring a black file and the smallest file size) and a freshly-formatted fast memory card was loaded. The tested rates and capacities are about best-obtainable for the camera and card combination being used.
 
Reducing any concerns about the buffer depth: using a Lexar 64GB Professional 1066x UDMA 7 Compact Flash Card (Max. Read/Write Speed: 160/155 MB/s), the 5D Mark IV captured 36 frames in 4.98 seconds to precisely match the rated speed and, great news, far exceed the rated buffer depth. In addition, with this Lexar card installed, additional frames continued to be captured at a 4.4 fps rate. If DPRAW capture is enabled, the frame rate using the same card drops to 4.9 and the buffer wall is hit at only 9 frames. Subsequent frames are captured at a 2.2 fps rate. The larger-sized DPRAW images definitely impact performance in this regard.
 
Using a Lexar 128GB Professional 1000x UHS-II SDXC U3 Memory Card, the 5D Mark IV captured 21 frames in 2.85 seconds to once again match the rated drive speed and also match the UDMA 7 buffer depth rating. Using this card, the post buffer-filled frame rate was 1.6 fps.
 
Using a Sony 32GB Class 10 UHS-I (SF32UX) SDHC Card (Max. Read/Write Speed: 94/45 MB/s), the 5D IV captured a respectable 24 frames in 3.28 seconds to again precisely match the rated drive speed and exceed the rated buffer depth by a few frames. Using this card, the post buffer-filled frame rate was 1.6 fps. So, the slower UHS-I card recorded a higher number of frames before filling the buffer than the faster UHS-II (not-supported) card.
 
These buffer capacities should be considered best-possible for the referenced cards and your in-the-field results will likely vary, but a fast memory card, especially a fast CF card, definitely makes a difference with this camera.
 
Following are links to MP3 files capturing the sounds of the 5D IV:
 
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV One Shot Mode
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Burst Mode
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Silent Mode
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Silent Burst Mode
Burst Comparison: Canon EOS 5D Mark III compared to IV
 
Camera sounds are recorded using a Tascam DR-07mkII Portable Digital Audio Recorder with record levels set to 50% at -12db gain and positioned 1" behind the rear LCD.
 
The 5D III vs. 5D IV sound comparison illuminates the more-subdued sound of the 5D Mark IV. The silent modes are once again available, but ... with the camera being quieter to begin with, the silent modes don't seem as dramatically quieter in this camera. Live view shooting can be used to further minimalize the 5D Mark IV's audibility.
 
Learn much more about the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV here.
 
You can find Canon 5D Mark IV in stock at these retailers
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 9/9/2016 2:16:24 PM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Thursday, September 8, 2016
Just posted: Zeiss 50mm f/2M Milvus Lens Review.
 
No, I didn't try to time this review with the announcement of three new Zeiss Milvus lenses. Instead of being finsihed with the Milvus reviews (6 so far), it looks like I have more Milvus work incoming. I know – you're feeling sorry for me. ;)
 
B&H has the Zeiss 50mm f/2M Milvus Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 9/8/2016 9:55:16 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, September 7, 2016
Ready for your out of the box experience? Like so many of you, I highly anticipated the arrival of the 5D Mark IV and as has long been my practice, I created a list of setup steps and once again share them with you here. Here are the 41 steps to my Canon EOS 5D Mark IV setup.
 
  1. Open the box, find the battery and charger and plug it in. If you have another charged LP-E6/LP-E6N battery available, you can continue to the battery-required steps without a wait. Or, the supplied battery may have enough charge to take you through these steps if you can't wait.
  2. While the battery is charging, unpack the other items you want from the box. For me, this is primarily the camera, the eye cup, the neck strap and the Canon Solution Disk.
  3. Download and install the latest Canon EOS Solution Disk software on your computer to get support for the latest camera(s). Canon Digital Photo Pro (DPP), EOS Utility, Photostitch and Lens Registration Utility are the options I manually include in the install.
  4. Attach the neck strap.
  5. Insert a sufficiently charged battery.
  6. Power the camera on.
  7. The date and time setup screen will show at startup the first time. Use the Rear Control dial and the Set button to update this information.
  8. Insert one (or two) memory card(s) (format them via the tools menu option before taking pictures).
  9. Set the camera's mode to Av, Tv or M (some modes provide only a small subset of available menu options).
  10. Scroll through all of the menu tabs to configure the cameras as follows:
  11. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Image quality: Use top dial to set RAW to "RAW" and Rear Control dial to set JPEG to "-"
  12. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Dual Pixel RAW: Enabled? (this feature awaits testing)
  13. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Image review: 4 sec.
  14. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Beep: Disable
  15. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Release without card: Disable/off (I highly recommend this setting)
  16. Shooting Menu, Tab 1: Lens aberration correction: All disabled (though I suggest leaving CA correction enabled for most uses - all can be applied to a RAW file in DPP)
  17. Shooting Menu, Tab 2: ISO Speed Settings: ISO Speed range: L(50)-H1(102400), Auto ISO Speed range: 100-32000
  18. Shooting Menu, Tab 2: Auto Lighting Optimizer: Disabled
  19. Shooting Menu, Tab 2: White balance: AWB-W (Auto: White priority)
  20. Shooting Menu, Tab 3: Picture Style: Neutral with Sharpness Strength set to "1" (Note: the low contrast "Neutral" picture style provides a histogram on the back of the camera that most-accurately shows me blown highlights and blocked shadows on the camera LCD. I usually change the Picture Style to "Standard" in DPP after capture.)
  21. Shooting Menu, Tab 3: Long exposure noise reduction: I usually have this option set to "Auto", but my choice varies for the situation.
  22. Shooting Menu, Tab 3: High ISO speed noise reduction: Off (noise reduction is destructive to image details - I prefer to add NR sparingly in post)
  23. AF Menu, Tab 2: AI Servo 1st image priority: Focus priority (I want the images in focus more than I want the time-priority capture)
  24. AF Menu, Tab 2: AI Servo 2nd image priority: Focus priority +2 (same reason)
  25. AF Menu, Tab 3: One-Shot AF release priority: Focus priority (same reason)
  26. AF Menu, Tab 4: Orientation linked AF point: Separate AF pts: Area + pt
  27. AF Menu, Tab 4: Auto AF point selection: EOS iTR AF: EOS iTR AF (face priority)
  28. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Highlight alert: Enable (flash portions of images that are overexposed)
  29. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Histogram disp: RGB (I want to monitor all three color channels for blown or blocked pixels)
  30. Playback Menu, Tab 3: Magnification (apx): Actual size (from selected AF point)
  31. Setup Menu, Tab 1: Auto rotate: On/Computer only (this provides the largest playback image size on the camera LCD)
  32. Setup Menu, Tab 2: Viewfinder display: Viewfinder level: Show, VF grid display: Show
  33. Setup Menu, Tab 3: Info button display options: Electronic level only
  34. Setup Menu, Tab 3: Info button LV display options: Options 3 and 4 checked; Histogram disp: RGB
  35. Setup Menu, Tab 5: Custom shooting mode (C1-C3): Auto update set: Enable (see also: Configuring Custom Shooting Modes)
  36. Setup Menu, Tab 5: Copyright information: Type name as desired
  37. Custom Functions, Tab 1: Bracketing auto cancel: [Off] selected
  38. Custom Functions, Tab 3: Custom Controls: AF-ON: One shot AI Servo; Set: Playback; Multicontroller: Direct AF point selection; AF area selection button: ISO
  39. Custom Functions, Tab 4: Default erase option: [Erase] selected
  40. My Menu: Add the first tab; Register the following options for Tab 1: Long exposure noise reduction, Mirror lockup, Format card, Date/Time/Zone (great for monitoring what time it is), Sensor cleaning, Expo.comp./AEB
  41. Mount a lens, focus on a subject and adjust the viewfinder diopter (if necessary)
I of course make other menu and setting changes based on current shooting scenarios, but this list covers my initial camera setup process.
 
To copy this configuration would mean that you intend to shoot similar to how I shoot – including shooting in RAW-only format. While my setup works great for me, your best use of this list may be for tweaking your own setup.
 
If you can't remember your own menu setup parameters, keeping an up-to-date list such as this one is a good idea. Anytime your camera goes in for a service visit, the camera will be returned in a reset-to-factory state (unless you request otherwise). Your list will ensure that you do not miss an important setting when putting the camera back into service.
 
More Information
 
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 9/7/2016 8:12:10 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, September 6, 2016
The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV page has been significantly updated with lots of additional information since last mentioned here.
 
This camera should be on the streets very soon. B&H is still indicating that the 5D IV body and w/EF 24-70mm f/4L IS Lens kit "Will begin shipping Thu, Sep 8" with the added disclaimer "(Subject to availability)". Adorama is saying "Manufacturer will start shipping this item on 09/08/2016." Amazon is stating "This item will be released on September 8, 2016." September 8th is only two days away – Woo hoo!
 
The 5D IV kit with the new Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS II USM Lens is not scheduled arrive at retailers until October 31st. However, with no savings realized by the kit purchase, my recommendation is to preorder the camera and lens individually. You'll then get both as quickly as possible.
 
The Canon BG-E20 Battery Grip for the EOS 5D Mark IV is also scheduled to arrive on September 8th. While not inexpensive, the price of this accessory has settled down to the $349.00 price that B&H initially listed. There was apparently some confusion early on as Adorama and Amazon initially priced the BG-E20 at $490.00.
 
Also scheduled to arrive on September 8th is the Canon WE-1 Wi-Fi Adapter. Because new firmware is necessary for this adapter to work, expect new Canon EOS 5Ds, 5Ds R and 7D Mark II firmware to also become available very soon. We'll share that news as soon as we have it.
 
Important: Using this site's links to place your preorders provides the support we need to keep this site maintained. Thanks for that!
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 9/6/2016 8:46:53 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, September 2, 2016
Image quality results from the Canon EOS 5Ds R and Canon EOS 7D Mark II have been added to the Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/2M Lens page.
 
I'll have more to say about the sharpness of this lens soon.
 
B&H has the Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/2M Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 9/2/2016 8:15:39 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, August 31, 2016
Image quality results from the Canon EOS 5Ds R and Canon EOS 7D Mark II have been added to the Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Lens page.
 
This lens lives at the bottom of Canon's telephoto zoom lens lineup. It is available in refurbished condition for less than the cost of a good filter. But, it was next in line to go in front of the highest resolution DSLR available. Check out how it fared.
 
B&H has the Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Lens in stock. This lens is also available in a USM version. Why does the USM version cost $10 less?
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 8/31/2016 9:40:51 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, August 30, 2016
The Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens and Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS II USM Lens pages have been updated. Updates include MTF chart comparisons (very interesting) and side-by-side new vs. old lens product images.
 
Important: Using this site's links to place your preorders provides the support we need to keep this site maintained. Thanks for that!
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 8/30/2016 8:56:12 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
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