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 Wednesday, November 11, 2015
Just posted: Tamron 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD Lens Review.
 
Is this lens as similar to the Tamron 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD Lens as expected? Read the review to find out how one similarity caused me trouble.
 
B&H has the Tamron 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD Lens in stock.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 11/11/2015 7:22:37 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan

 
Breakthrough Photography, makers of our favorite 10-stop neutral density filter, have introduced a Kickstarter campaign to jumpstart production of their X3 circular polarizer, billed as the world's sharpest and most color-neutral CPL filter.
 
Considering the quality of their ND filters we have no reason to doubt the claims regarding their X3 circular polarizing filter. Supporting the Kickstarter campaign will allow you to get an X3 CPL filter at a nice discount vs. retail pricing.
 
From the Breakthrough Photography:
 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA – Breakthrough Photography, a San Francisco-based research and manufacturing startup, has announced a new circular polarizer called the X3 CPL. They claim the X3 CPL to be “the world’s sharpest and most color neutral circular polarizer.”
 
Aimed at professional outdoor photographers, the X3 CPL features SCHOTT B270 optical glass, MRC16, nanotec nano coatings and an all-new internally developed circular polarizing film, called CrystalVision, manufactured in California.
 
Coming off the success of the X3 Neutral Density filter launched on Kickstarter last year, the X3 CPL adapts the same proven weather-sealed “traction frame” design as the company’s X3 ND, which is CNC machined from brass.
 
“We took all that we learned from the success of the X3 ND and adapted it to a circular polarizer. At the core of the X3 CPL lies our internally developed, American-made CPL film, and it sets the X3 CPL apart from all other competing circular polarizers. And we’ve even designed a X3 CPL specifically for Leica shooters, and for Canon’s CINE Lens Lineup, too.” said founder and photographer Graham Clark.
 
The X3 CPL is immediately available for pre-order on Kickstarter in limited quantities with a December 2015 delivery schedule. Pre-ordering and product information can be found by visiting the company’s website at http://www.breakthrough.photography/
 
“We’re really excited to bring the X3 CPL to the photography community on Kickstarter first. We’ll be offering a one-time launch sale price of up to $50 off, in limited quantities, just in time for the holiday season.”says founder and photographer Graham Clark. “If this Kickstarter campaign proves successful, the X3 CPL will be available for purchase on Amazon Prime, B&H and Adorama directly following the Kickstarter campaign.”
 
X3 CPL Key Features:
 
  • Critically sharp SCHOTT B270 Optical Glass
  • American-made CrystalVision CPL film
  • MRC16 reduces flaring and ghosting
  • nanotec nano coating layers repels elements
  • Rugged Ultra-slim Weather-sealed Traction Frame
  • 25 Year Support
X3 CPL Size & Retail Pricing:
 
  • 39mm, 46mm, 49mm, 52mm, 58mm, 62mm for $129
  • 67mm and 72mm for $139
  • 77mm for $149
  • 82mm for $159
  • 95mm for $189
  • 105mm for $199
 Tuesday, November 10, 2015
From Redrock Micro:
 
Mobile app and parabolic motorized slider combine to speed setup, enhance interview intimacy
 
Dallas, TX and Hollywood, CA - Redrock Micro, the recognized leader in affordable professional cinema accessories, today announced the release of the new iOS remote app for One Man Crew Director. The mobile app enables wireless setup and control of the One Man Crew motorized parabolic slider, and adds features for streamlining small crew workflow and enhancing on-set intimacy for interviews. The app is available for immediate download from the Apple App store.
 

Streamlining Interviews and Enhancing Set Intimacy
The remote app for iOS works on iPhone or iPad, and connects wirelessly to the One Man Crew Director. Once connected, all of the functions of the One Man Crews side panel are available on the app. Building on the remote functions, the App adds new Gesture Screen so camera movement can sync with the interview's tempo and emotion without looking away from your subject.
 
Benefits of the iOS One Man Crew Remote App include:
 
  • Faster setup with touch-screen control of all the unit's side panel operations.
  • More convenient operation to start and stop camera movement, change speed, and start and stop camera recording, saving time and effort.
  • Enhance interview intimacy with the new Gesture Screen to sync camera movements to tempo and mood of interview without looking away from the subject or having additional crew on set.
  • Improved support with mobile access to the One Man Crew operating manual.
"The OMC Remote App is fantastic," said Matthew Allard of Newsshooter.com. "It is intuitive and very straightforward to use. This makes operating the One Man Crew Director so much easier. The ability to control your device while standing next to another camera saves you a lot of time and gives you the added versatility of being able to change the speed or modify your parabolic moves..."
 
Great Interviews for Solo or Small Crews
The iOS remote app works with the award-winning One Man Crew Director, the only parabolic motorized slider that adds camera movement without requiring a dedicated operator while keeping the subject in focus and anchored in frame. This feature makes the One Man Crew Director uniquely well-suited for interviews, reality television, talking head, corporate, and documentary work.
 
"(We) Love the new One Man Crew Director app. It's really convenient to operate the slider from anywhere on set," said Zach Rutledge, Co-Owner of Songbird Media Group. Songbird Media is a full-scale, state-of-the-art media production company. Songbird relies on gear including the One Man Crew Director to create polished, higher quality interviews for their clients.
 
The latest version of the iOS Remote App includes an API for developers. Using the API, the One Man Crew Director control can be integrated into third party applications.
 
The iOS Remote App for One Man Crew joins the Android version of the Remote App that is also available.
 
Owners of the original One Man Crew can use the Remote app with an upgrade to the One Man Crew Director, currently on sale at $300 discount for a limited time.
 
B&H carries the Redrock Micro One Man Crew Director.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 11/10/2015 6:41:44 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, November 9, 2015

 
From the Canon Australia YouTube Channel:
 
World famous, Vincent Laforet, brings his unique AIR Project to Sydney.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 11/9/2015 2:34:46 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Safe to say is that nearly everyone reading this post has their eye on a piece of camera kit, that one piece that will take their capabilities to the next level. Usually, money is the barrier to taking that next step, so let's talk about increasing available cash. Raising funds generally involves earning money by working, selling something of value and/or spending less.
 
Sell Your Images and Photography Services
 
Since photography is our love, most of us will find the best option to raise money for camera gear is to sell our images and/or photography services. This is of course easier said than done, but get a sales channel going and you will have a recurring revenue stream to support your photo kit growth long term. Advertise your portrait services to your Facebook friends. Ask your kid's teammates' parents if they would be interested in spending a few dollars for some great sports action pics. Hang prints for sale in local establishments.
 
An upside to selling prints and services is that, if you sell enough, your accountant will likely allow you to write-off your gear costs and other expenses, saving you a lot of money by effectively reducing your costs significantly.
 
Sell Your Old Camera Gear
 
You have likely been upgrading to the latest camera and lens models as they are released. But, are you cleaning out what doesn't get used any longer? If there is gear in your kit has not been used in a year or two and is not needed for backup purposes, it is probably not worth keeping and is a potential source of funding for the hot new gear.
 
Selling camera gear direct to a buyer can bring you the most revenue, but ... it doesn't get easier and the risk doesn't get lower than selling to B&H. They take care of everything and you can count on getting paid.
 
Sell Something Else
 
For many of us, the camera gear is the priority, so ... what else can you sell? What is taking up space in your house, garage, attic, basement, etc. but has been unused for a year? Are you really going to use it again? Sell it on eBay. The process is easy and you might be surprised at what other people want. Even if you don't make a lot per item, repeat the process enough times and the funds start adding up. Available space in your house also increases. Perhaps enough to make room for a new photo setup, even if it is only a product/macro setup.
 
Offline, the "Bake sale" suggestion keeps bubbling to the surface around here. Beats selling a body part for sure and a good sandwich sale could finance an L lens.
 
Get More Money from the Day Job
 
If your day job is not photography related, I hesitate to recommend that you work more hours as doing so may cut into your photography time, but ... a little overtime in your off season (winter perhaps?) could go a long way in financing some new glass. Another option with longer term payback: spend some time educating yourself to qualify for a position that commands a higher salary.
 
If your day job is commission based, put in more sales time and effort for a greater compensation reward. Finding a side job that you find enjoyable, even if for only an evening or two each week, can raise considerable funds over a period of time.
 
I should note here that time with the family should not suffer if you are working more hours. Make your family your highest priority. Take the extra working hours out of your personal time (put away the video games).
 
Increase Your Rates
 
Do you charge a rate for the work you do? Being the low-priced option might be necessary for someone starting out in an industry, but the goal is to quickly leave the bargain basement pricing behind you. Increase your rates. Get good enough to become worth more in the eyes of your clients or your employer. Study your craft and deliver the highest quality of work possible. Then educate why your work is better.
 
Work More Efficiently
 
The amount of time we have cannot be increased, but better utilizing the time we do have is the goal.
 
Post processing consumes a large part of many photography jobs and especially with the additional bandwidth requirements of the ultra-high resolution DSLR cameras arriving on the scene, computing performance is a common bottleneck. There are likely few of us who find the anticipation of an image loading to full resolution to be worth the time spent watching it do so. I recently replaced the lab laptop with a model that processes images twice as fast. It is not hard to justify an expense that frees time like this.
 
Another consideration is to outsource the work that is not core to your services (or that you do not like, or are not good at). This work can include accounting, payroll, lawn mowing, cleaning, etc. Or, hire an assistant that complements your skill set and/or handles the tasks that do not require your skills. Working smart includes working carefully (mistakes are very time consuming), quickly and of course, hard.
 
Tighten the Budget
 
Increasing available cash from an existing revenue streams (such as the day job) can be accomplished by tightening the budget. Even a modest $20 per week savings will net over $1,000 in a year in after tax dollars. Pack a lunch a couple of days per week. Give up a few of the fancy cups of coffee each week. Ride a bike to work. Look at where your money is going and stop some of the flow.
 
How Not to Fund Camera Gear
 
Your credit card makes it easy to place an order for any gear that you want right now. But, I strongly recommend not using your credit card as the source of a loan for camera gear. While I very highly recommend using credit cards (pick a good rewards card with the warranty extension feature), credit card companies charge extremely high interest rates that can become a long term burden. Pay the credit cards in full every month to avoid this additional cost. Find another source for a loan if necessary.
 
Get a Loan
 
I was not going to include this option, but since I strongly discouraged using a credit card as a loan source, I wanted to note that a loan is not always a bad decision for camera and post production gear purchased for business use. If you think that a capital investment in camera gear will allow you to increase your business opportunities and revenue, a loan from a reputable source with a reasonable interest rate may be a valid consideration. Before signing for the cash, make sure that you have a business plan in place that includes loan repayment. Lenses hold their value especially well, meaning that aborting the plan early will not likely prove disastrous. Even so, go into debt only with careful forethought.
 
Watch for Deals
 
One of our goals here The-Digital-Picture.com is to maximize your kit improvement per dollar. The retailers we promote (especially B&H) always offer low prices combined with excellent customer service. The highly relevant short term deals we search out and share on the news page/feed range from very good to amazing. Make sure to check in at least daily to insure that you don't miss the opportunity to save on the gear you want or need.
 
Summary
 
Basically, the camera gear kit funding strategy is: make more, spend less, sell what you are not using and shop smart. Then watch your kit grow. Sounds simple, right?
 
What are your kit-funding strategies?
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 11/9/2015 9:20:29 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
From the Flickr Blog:
 
Flickr for iOS 9 is here! And we have some cool new features to help you get the most out of the latest Apple software and devices.
 
3D Touch
 
On the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus, we’ve added 3D Touch support, enabling you to preview photos, people, notifications and more with a light press of your screen.
 
In your Flickr Camera Roll, we’ve developed a new 3D Touch gesture to help you find your best shot. Lightly press a photo to see a preview, then move your finger left/right to page through neighboring photos. Once you’ve found your favorite, press harder to Pop full-screen.
 
Quick Actions
 
New in iOS 9, 3D Touch “Quick Actions” let you do the things you do most often, faster and in fewer steps. Lightly press our app icon to upload a photo, skip directly to notifications or the feed or to kick off a search right from your homescreen.
 
Spotlight Search
 
Using Spotlight search in iOS 9, search for albums, groups or recently-viewed photos without even opening the Flickr app.
 
Universal Links
 
With universal link support, links you send or receive will now open directly in the Flickr app, instead of as a web page in Safari. So the next time you share photos from a night out, last weekend or a recent trip, the recipient can view your photos in a beautiful, interactive and native experience.
 
Get the latest Flickr app for iOS – available in the App Store!
Posted to: Canon News,
Category: Flickr News
Post Date: 11/9/2015 8:19:03 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Canon USA's website has been completely redesigned with an updated interface that [in my experience] more closely resembles their international sites.
 

What do you think of Canon USA's overhaul? Let us know in the comments.
Posted to: Canon News
Category: Canon USA News
Post Date: 11/9/2015 6:13:10 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, November 6, 2015
More often than not, wind is the enemy of photographers. Blowing wind puts not-fixed objects into motion, including light stands, reflectors, subjects' hair and ... leaves. Landscape photographers are perhaps most negatively affected by wind, with moving flora being their problem (along with mirror-like reflections on bodies of water being disturbed). You can't stop the wind. At least not on a large scale such as a landscape.
 
Fortunately, there are options for dealing with the wind.
 
The first option involves selecting a time when the wind is not blowing. Shoot early or late in the day when the winds tend to be most calm. Of course, shooting early or late in the day may mean less light and with a wind-unfriendly longer exposures necessary. If possible, come back on another day when the wind is not blowing.
 
The next option is to stop the wind, not physically, but in-camera. Use a faster shutter speed, enabled by using a narrower aperture and/or a higher ISO setting. Right, you may not be able to use ISO 100 for ALL of your landscape photos and I give you permission to bump up the ISO as high as you need to go (in case you are mentally struggling with this option). Our modern cameras can still create great imagery at high ISO settings and more often than not, noise is better than motion blur.
 
One way to mitigate the high ISO noise to a varying degree is to capture two images of the same scene from a stationary camera using different ISO and shutter speed settings. Later during post processing, stack the two images in Photoshop or a similar app and allow the lower noise level image to show for the sky, rocks, buildings and other non-wind-affected subjects. A touch of noise reduction on the higher ISO-captured layer should help. The result is an image with the lowest noise levels possible throughout the scene. If using this suggestion, I recommended shooting multiple pairs of frames to have more options to deal with potential subject movement overlap.
 
Another option available on a small scale is to stabilize the subject. Various clamping devices including the Wimberley Plamp are available to hold a subject in place while a photo is captured. I've used Y-shaped sticks stuck into the ground to keep smaller flora in place.
 
And the last option I have to share with you: Embrace the wind. Use a longer exposure and capture blurred leaves. I know, having a not-sharp part of the landscape frame is hard for those of us used to striving for everything sharp in the frame, but give it a try. When the wind is blowing, every frame can be unique including the position of tree branches in relation to the rest of the composition. If you think one position will be better than the others, time the shot with the branch in that location. Shoot a lot of frames with a variety of camera settings and prepare for a long review session to determine which images rise above the rest.
 
When composing for wind motion blur, I usually like to incorporate some non-blurred elements in the photo (such as a tree trunk) to anchor the frame. This is not a requirement, but I usually want the frame to include subjects that are either sharp or noticeably blurred as images with slight blurs may leave the viewer uncomfortable with or confused by your technique. To increase the amount of blur, zoom in or move closer to the subject so that its movement covers a larger area of the frame. Better preserving a desired composition is the use a longer exposure to give the in-motion subject time to show more movement. Use a neutral density filter if more time is needed than your desired in-camera settings can produce.
 
Because the path of wind-blown flora is not always predictable, composing slightly wider than what appears to be ideal is often a good decision. Crop to taste during post processing.
 
Part of the fun of shooting wind-blown flora is the anticipation of seeing the results. We can envision what the images are going look like, but seeing them appear on the LCD brings the effort to fruition. Hopefully with a positive outcome.
 
Don't let the wind be your excuse for not getting great shots. Either work around it, work with it or, my favorite option, do both!
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 11/6/2015 9:47:04 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Nikon has released its financial results for 2Q of the fiscal year ending in March, 2016.
 
Second Quarter of the Year ending March 2016 [November 6, 2015]
 
Financial Results (PDF:218KB)
Financial and Business Data (PDF:94KB)
Presentation Material (PDF:1,028KB)
 


Related Article
 
Nikkei rebounds after Wall Street surges; Nikon tumbles (Reuters)
"Japan's Nikkei share average rebounded on Friday morning after Wall Street surged on receding worries about a U.S. interest rate hike, while Nikon Corp tumbled after releasing a weak earnings forecast. Nikon fell 13.5 percent to a three-month low of 1,483 yen after it forecast a 30.9 percent fall in its operating profit to 30 billion yen ($250 million) for the year to March 2016. Its American Depositary share price had dropped 13 percent overnight. Morgan Stanley MUFG Securities cut its rating to 'underweight' from 'equal-weight'."
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 11/6/2015 6:11:39 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From the Canon Professional Network:
"If you’re like me, you love looking at photographs. Creating images that capture a viewer’s interest and holds it usually doesn’t happen by accident. When you look at a photograph that captivates you, what is it that keeps you looking at the image? There are several answers to this question and in this blog, I’ll share with you some tips to help you create better composition in your images.
 
It’s important to look at a scene through your camera and intentionally use elements in the image to improve composition. I’ll talk about the use of compositional aids such as rule of thirds, negative space, leading lines, balance and the use of color. Sometimes making a great photograph means choosing a slightly different camera position or lens choice. More than simply pointing and shooting, a solid thought process should go into composing an image. Be an observer!"
See the entire article on the Canon Professional Network.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 11/6/2015 6:10:29 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, November 5, 2015
Image quality (ISO 12233 Enhanced Resolution Chart) results from the EOS 5Ds R and EOS 7D Mark II, vignetting, flare and distortion test results along with specs and measurements have been added to the following pages:
 
Zeiss Milvus 21mm f/2.8 Lens (exception: no image quality results presented at this time)
Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 Lens
Zeiss Milvus 100mm f/2M Lens
 
The Milvus 21mm image quality test results will be coming soon, along with the explanation of why these results are delayed.
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 11/5/2015 11:29:18 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Mikayla (she's 13) decided to make a lion costume. After a week of diligent designing, a run to the craft store, lots of cutting and plenty of sewing, she had a very impressive made-from-scratch full lion costume complete with a stuffed tail that had a curve at the end of it. She created the best lion costume she possibly could and my goal was to capture the fruition of her effort the best I could, creating a memory to cherish for a lifetime.
 
She finished the costume just in time to wear it Trick-or-Treating. For those unfamiliar with this tradition, the kids spend an evening walking around town wearing costumes and people hand out candy from their front doors. Well in advance, I requested time for a photo session with Mikayla wearing the costume, but ... kids in their most photogenic moments seem to be completed (hair, makeup, etc.) just in time to ... leave for their big event.
 
I requested 15 minutes notice prior to the photo op (I know, I ask for a lot), got 10 minutes and scrambled to finalize my decision on what the short photo session was going to look like. The amount of remaining daylight was the biggest question I had prior to this moment. It seemed logical that a lion should be outdoors, so I was hoping for some light remaining in the sky and with at least some ambient light, outdoors was the final location selection.
 
While the leaves were just beyond their peak fall colors, they were still clinging to the trees and had a still-nice color that was indicative of the autumn season. A location that could incorporate this color in the background was the next decision.
 
I knew that I wanted a blurred background, that I had plenty of working distance available and that I wanted subject framing ranging from environmental to tight headshots. I went with the 200mm focal length as it would work well for those requirements and I went with the Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS lens to maximize the background blur (and to get put the most available light possible onto the sensor).
 
Lions are known for their nasty predator look and for their roar. Mikayla was acting the part, but since she is a very sweet girl, the nasty-mean lion look made her naturally smile big soon afterward. I still find it a little unsettling to look at the pictures of her roaring, but definitely like the smiles that came afterward. And I like some of the little smiles that came between the two extremes, as seen here.
 
As planned, I captured a wide variety of poses and subject framing (in the 10 minutes of shooting time I was given). I liked many, but ... her crimped hair acting as the lion's mane "stood out" for me. So, I chose to share a moderately tightly-framed portrait with you.
 
The mechanics of taking pictures turned out to be an easy part of this series of images, with the ambient light working especially well. I've received a lot of positive comments from friends, with "Those are great photos!" being very common. The subject was of course largely responsible for these responses, but the ability of this lens to strongly blur the fall-colored background, making the subject pop, was another strong contributor to them. This lens, though not inexpensive, can do the same for photos of your own family, or for those for your clients.
 
The next time you have portraits planned for fall capture, look for trees that can provide a colorful background to your image. The color of the fall foliage should be complementary to your subject's clothing and the colorful trees should not steal the show from the primary subject, but especially when blurred, fall foliage can add a beautiful natural color to portrait backgrounds.
 
A larger version of this image is available on Flickr, Google+, 500px and Facebook. Also, if reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
 
Camera and Lens Settings
200mm  f/2.0  1/160s
ISO 320
5339 x 7887px
Posted to: Canon News,
Post Date: 11/5/2015 8:06:52 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
MELVILLE, N.Y., November 4, 2015 - Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, congratulates its parent company, Canon Inc.'s Chairman and CEO, Fujio Mitarai, on his recent recognition as one of the top 100 World's Best-Performing CEOs in 2015 by Harvard Business Review, an esteemed business management publication. Recognizing his enduring success and leadership, Mr. Mitarai holds the number 10 spot on this year's list, making an impressive stride from his number 45 ranking in 2014.
 
In addition to recognizing companies based on financial growth and stability, new to this year's methodology, Harvard Business Review added measurement of each company's environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance. This ranking, along with the measurement of each company's financial performance, which looks at country-adjusted total shareholder return, industry-adjusted total shareholder return and change in market capitalization, calculated the final rankings. In total, Harvard Business Review evaluated the 907 CEOs included both in the S&P Global 1200 for 2014, an index that comprises 70% of the world's stock market capitalization, and have been in position for at least two years.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 11/5/2015 7:32:17 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Canon:
 
Notice Regarding the Phenomenon of Skipped Frames in Footage Recorded in Slow Motion on the EOS C300 Mark II Digital Cinema Camera
 
Thank you for using Canon products.
 
We have become aware that there may be cases of skipped frames in footage recorded in slow motion on the EOS C300 Mark II Digital Cinema Camera. Customer support for this phenomenon is described below.
 
We would like to offer our sincere apologies to users for the inconvenience caused by this phenomenon. Going forward, we will spare no effort in our quality management to make sure our customers can use our products with confidence.
 
Phenomenon
Except as provided below, footage recorded in slow motion in Slow & Fast Motion Recording Mode, in 4K and 2K/HD, and at all frame rates, may have skipped frames.
 
This phenomenon does not occur for slow motion recording at the following settings:
 
  • 2K/HD recording at 59.94P & 50.00P frame rates
Affected Product
EOS C300 Mark II Digital Cinema Cameras with firmware version 1.0.0.1.00 are affected. The camera’s firmware version can be checked from [System Setup] on the menu.
 
Press the MENU button, then select [System Setup] --> [Firmware] --> [Camera].
 
Support
Canon has released new firmware that incorporates countermeasures for this phenomenon. Please download and install the firmware update.
 
Download Firmware Version 1.0.1.1.00 for the EOS C300 Mark II
 
B&H carries the Canon EOS C300 Mark II Cinema Camera.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 11/5/2015 7:23:10 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Canon:
 
EOS C100 Cinema EOS Camera with Dual Pixel CMOS AF Feature Upgrade applied
 
Details
Firmware Version 2.0.5.1.00 incorporates the following improvements:
 
  • Enables peripheral illumination correction for the following lenses:
    • EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM=
    • EF-S 10-18mm f/4-5.6 IS STM
    • EF 400mm f/4L DO IS USM
    • EF 11-24mm f/4L USM
    • EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
    • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6LII IS USM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • CN7×17 KAS S/E1
  • When one of the following EF lenses is attached and power is turned off, the lens automatically retracts to its minimum length:
    • EF 40mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF 50mm f/1.8 STM
Notes
Firmware Version 2.0.5.1.00 is only for EOS C100 cameras with the Dual Pixel CMOS AF Feature Upgrade. If the EOS C100 camera does not have DAF Feature Upgrade applied, please download Firmware Version 2.0.5.1.00.
 
Firmware Version 2.0.5.1.00 is for updating Cinema EOS C100 cameras running firmware version 2.0.0.1.00 to 2.0.4.1.00. If your camera’s firmware is already version 2.0.5.1.00, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camera is updated to the latest firmware version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
 
For further information, please refer to the latest version of the unit’s Instruction Manual that is released with the firmware update
 
Support
Download Firmware Version 2.0.5.1.00 for the EOS C100

EOS C100 Cinema EOS Camera
 
DetailsFirmware Version 1.0.5.1.00 incorporates the following improvements:
 
  • Enables peripheral illumination correction for the following lenses:
    • EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM=
    • EF-S 10-18mm f/4-5.6 IS STM
    • EF 400mm f/4L DO IS USM
    • EF 11-24mm f/4L USM
    • EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
    • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6LII IS USM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • CN7×17 KAS S/E1
  • When one of the following EF lenses is attached and power is turned off, the lens automatically retracts to its minimum length:
    • EF 40mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF 50mm f/1.8 STM
Notes
Firmware Version 1.0.5.1.00 is only for EOS C100 cameras without the Dual Pixel CMOS AF Feature Upgrade. If the EOS C100 camera has had the DAF Feature Upgrade applied, please download Firmware Version 2.0.5.1.00.
 
Firmware Version 1.0.5.1.00 is for updating Cinema EOS C100 cameras running firmware version 1.0.0.1.00 to 1.0.4.1.00. If your camera’s firmware is already version 1.0.5.1.00, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camera is updated to the latest firmware version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
 
For further information, please refer to the latest version of the unit’s Instruction Manual that is released with the firmware update.
 
Support
Download Firmware Version 1.0.5.1.00 for the EOS C100

EOS C100 Mark II Cinema EOS Camera
 
Details
Firmware Version 1.0.1.1.00 incorporates the following improvements:
 
  • Enables peripheral illumination correction for the following lenses:
    • EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM=
    • EF-S 10-18mm f/4-5.6 IS STM
    • EF 400mm f/4L DO IS USM
    • EF 11-24mm f/4L USM
    • EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
    • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6LII IS USM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • CN7×17 KAS S/E1
Notes
Firmware Version 1.0.1.1.00 is for updating Cinema EOS C100 cameras running firmware version 1.0.0.1.00. If your camera’s firmware is already version 1.0.1.1.00, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camera is updated to the latest firmware version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
 
For further information, please refer to the latest version of the unit’s Instruction Manual that is released with the firmware update.
 
Support
Download Firmware Version 1.0.1.1.00 for the EOS C100 Mark II

EOS C300 / C300 PL Cinema EOS Camera
 
Details
Firmware Version 1.1.4.1.00 incorporates the following improvements:
 
Common to EOS C300/EOS C300 PL
 
  • Enables the user to change fan operating mode between On and Automatic. When set to Automatic, the fan turns off during shooting at normal temperature. When the camera temperature rises, the fan starts automatically and lowers the temperature.
EOS C300 only
 
  • Enables control of CINE-SERVO lenses using the RC-V100 remote controller.
  • Enables peripheral illumination correction for the following lenses:
    • EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM=
    • EF-S 10-18mm f/4-5.6 IS STM
    • EF 400mm f/4L DO IS USM
    • EF 11-24mm f/4L USM
    • EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
    • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6LII IS USM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • CN7×17 KAS S/E1
  • When one of the following EF lenses is attached and power is turned off, the lens automatically retracts to its minimum length:
    • EF 40mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF 50mm f/1.8 STM
Notes
Firmware Version 1.1.4.1.00 is only for EOS C300 cameras without the Dual Pixel CMOS AF Feature Upgrade. If the EOS C300 camera has had the Dual Pixel CMOS AF Feature Upgrade applied, please download Firmware Version 2.1.4.1.00.
 
Firmware Version 1.1.4.1.00 is for Cinema EOS C300 or EOS C300 PL cameras with Firmware Version 1.1.3.1.00 or earlier. If your camera’s firmware is already version 1.1.4.1.00, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camera is updated to the latest firmware version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
 
For further details, please refer to the latest version of the instruction manual for this product, which will be released at the same time as this firmware update.
 
Support
Download Firmware Version 1.1.4.1.00 for the EOS C300
Download Firmware Version 1.1.4.1.00 for the EOS C300 PL

EOS C300 Cinema Camera with Dual Pixel CMOS AF Feature Upgrade applied
 
Details
Firmware Version 2.1.4.1.00 incorporates the following improvements:
 
  • Enables control of CINE-SERVO lenses using the RC-V100 remote controller.
  • Enables peripheral illumination correction for the following lenses:
    • EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM=
    • EF-S 10-18mm f/4-5.6 IS STM
    • EF 400mm f/4L DO IS USM
    • EF 11-24mm f/4L USM
    • EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
    • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6LII IS USM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • CN7×17 KAS S/E1
  • When one of the following EF lenses is attached and power is turned off, the lens automatically retracts to its minimum length:
    • EF 40mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF 50mm f/1.8 STM
  • Enables the user to change fan operating mode between On and Automatic. When set to Automatic, the fan turns off during shooting at normal temperature. When the camera temperature rises, the fan starts automatically and lowers the temperature.
Notes
Firmware Version 2.1.4.1.00 is only for EOS C300 cameras with the Dual Pixel CMOS AF Feature Upgrade applied. If the EOS C300 camera does not have Dual Pixel CMOS AF Feature Upgrade applied, please download Firmware Version 1.1.4.1.00.
 
Firmware Version 2.1.4.1.00 is for Cinema EOS C300 cameras with Firmware Version 2.1.2.1.00 - 2.1.3.1.00. If your camera’s firmware is already version 2.1.4.1.00, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camera is updated to the latest firmware version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
 
For further details, please refer to the latest version of the instruction manual for this product, which will be released at the same time as this firmware update.
 
Support
Download Firmware Version 2.1.4.1.00 for the EOS C300 with Dual Pixel CMOS AF Feature Upgrade applied

EOS C500 Cinema Camera
 
Details
Firmware Version 1.0.7.1.00 incorporates the following additions and improvements:
 
  • Enables control of CINE-SERVO lenses using the RC-V100 remote controller.
  • Enables peripheral illumination correction for the following lenses:
    • EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM=
    • EF-S 10-18mm f/4-5.6 IS STM
    • EF 400mm f/4L DO IS USM
    • EF 11-24mm f/4L USM
    • EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
    • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6LII IS USM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • CN7×17 KAS S/E1
  • When one of the following EF lenses is attached and power is turned off, the lens automatically retracts to its minimum length:
    • EF 40mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM
    • EF 50mm f/1.8 STM
Notes
Firmware Version 1.0.7.1.00 is for updating Cinema EOS C500 cameras with firmware of a version from 1.0.6.1.00 or earlier. If your camera’s firmware is already version 1.0.7.1.00, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camera is updated to the latest firmware version, it cannot be restored to a previous version. For details, please refer to the instruction manual (the updated version).
 
Support
Download Firmware Version 1.0.7.1.00 for the EOS C500

XC10
 
Details
Firmware Version 1.0.1.0 incorporates the following additions and improvements:
 
  • Adds Rolling Shutter Distortion Reduction function in Camera Setup Menu to enable image recording with reduced rolling shutter distortion when shooting 4K movies
Caution
 
  • You cannot perform the firmware update using CFast 2.0 cards. Please use a commercially available SD/SDHC/SDXC memory card that is 64MB or more for the firmware update.
Notes
Firmware Version 1.0.1.0 is for XC10 camcorders with Firmware Version 1.0.0.0. If your camcorder’s firmware is already Version 1.0.1.0, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camcorder is updated to the latest version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.
 
For further information, please refer to the latest version of the unit’s Instruction Manual that is released with the firmware update.
 
Support
Download Firmware Version 1.0.1.0 for the XC10
 
B&H carries the Canon EOS C100, C300, C500 and XC10 video cameras.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 11/5/2015 7:07:46 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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