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 Tuesday, March 7, 2017
With Nikon restructuring and slashing jobs, you may be interested to know how Canon plans to grow the various segments of its overall business in the coming years.
 
With that in mind, they've just published a slideshow presentaton from their Corporate Strategy Conference 2017. Here's the link:
 
Canon Corporate Strategy 2017 Presentation Material (.PDF)
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/7/2017 1:35:25 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
In a recent post, we answered the question Should You Turn Off "IS" When Using Action-Stopping Shutter Speeds? One of the questions generated by that post asked if image stabilization should be turned off or left enabled when shooting from a tripod. So, we went back to our very-knowledgeable Canon representative with this question. Again, the information below should not be considered official Canon guidelines, but it comes from a person who has substantial knowledge about Canon lenses and their IS systems.
First off, let's be clear -- any discussion about Image Stabilization on a tripod refers ONLY to a truly rock-solid tripod, on a totally firm surface without vibrations from passing traffic and so on. In many real-world situations, we're using tripods and other supports in conditions that really aren't totally solid. A good test, before discussing the question any further: the next time you're mounted on a tripod, turn your camera's Live View on, and magnify the LCD monitor image to its greatest setting. It's sometimes amazing how much shake and movement there really is, even on a tripod.
 
The point is pretty clear. In any situation where you're not truly rock-steady, whether you're mounted on a tripod, or certainly a monopod, using Image Stabilization normally makes a great deal of sense.
 
However, since the launch of the first Canon Image Stabilized lens (the EF 75-300mm IS zoom lens, from 1995), Canon engineers have recommended switching IS off if and when you're mounted on a tripod. Again, this pre-supposes it's a truly rock-solid tripod.
 
Canon's optical Image Stabilization has definitely evolved since its launch in 1995, and there are now different versions for lightweight, less-expensive lenses (like the EF-S 18-55mm standard zoom for compact cameras) than the more advanced IS units we see in (for example) L-series super-telephoto lenses. Basically, current Canon EF and EF-S lenses can detect when there's a total absence of "shake" (in other words, solidly tripod mounted), and internally disable the Image Stabilization if it's left on. But in some lenses -- and it varies, depending on the IS design in the lens in question -- the moveable IS lens elements aren't locked and centered when the IS is disabled this way, and can sometimes be susceptible to slight movement during exposure. On such lenses, physically switching IS off with the switch on the lens allows the lens to lock and center these elements.
 
Again, there are variables -- too many to get into here, since it depends on which lens model, which version (in other words, how old is the lens in question), and so on. But the bottom line remains pretty simple. It's safer to just switch IS off if you know there will be a complete absence of camera and lens movement during exposure.
 
One other thing... Canon's optical Image Stabilization is designed as a tool to get sharper pictures at "normal" shutter speeds. While the slow-speed limits may vary slightly from one lens model to another, Image Stabilization is disabled if the system detects a shutter speed longer than roughly one full second. So for longer night-time exposures, expect to just turn IS off, because it won't have an effect in your final pictures.
 
Hope this helps clarify the questions about Canon's optical Image Stabilization when cameras are tripod mounted.
We hope that your knowledge of image stabilization is now one stop greater!
 
Shown in this post's image is a tripod that meets the rock-solid requirement. This is a Really Right Stuff Ground Level Tripod, now carried by B&H.
Post Date: 3/7/2017 8:35:55 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
B&H has the Adobe Photoshop Elements 15 and Premiere Elements 15 available for $89.95 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $149.95.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Photo and Video Editing Software Bundle
  • Edit & Organize with Touchscreen Devices
  • Frown & Squint Adjustments, Batch Edits
  • Camera Shake Reduction, Haze Removal
  • Supports Editing and Viewing 4K Movies
  • Hollywood Effects and Face Detection
  • Enhanced Search and Smart Tags
  • Guided Edits for Both Photo and Video
  • Built-In Social Media Sharing
  • For Mac OS X 10.10-11 & Windows 7, 8, 10
Post Date: 3/7/2017 6:23:56 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has the Konova K2 Slider (47.3") available for $199.00 with free expedited shipping. Regularly $269.00.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Roller Bearing Sliding System
  • 39.6 lb Load Capacity
  • 47.3" Track Length
  • Tension-Adjustable Ball Bearings
  • Friction Adjustable Knob
  • 3/8"-16 Tie-Down Screw
  • Detachable Legs with Rubber Ball Feet
  • Ruler for Precise & Repeatable Moves
  • Dual Oil Seals for Cleaning Rails
  • Carrying Bag
Post Date: 3/7/2017 6:09:29 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Nikon:
 
D7200 Firmware Version 1.02
 
Changes from “C” Firmware Version 1.01 to 1.02
 
  • The WT-7 wireless transmitter is now supported.
  • Fixed the following issues:
    • If On was selected for Auto distortion control, distortion would appear at the edges of photos taken with NEF (RAW) + JPEG fine selected for Image quality and Medium selected for Image size.
    • Pictures would sometimes not be recorded.
    • Optimal exposure would sometimes not be achieved in photos taken in live view using a lens with electromagnetically controlled aperture (type E and PC-E lenses).
Download: Nikon D7200 Firmware Version 1.02
 


D500 Firmware Version 1.12
 
Changes from “C” Firmware Version 1.11 to 1.12
 
  • Fixed an issue that resulted in unreliable connections between the camera and the iOS 10.2 version of the SnapBridge app.
Download: Nikon D500 Firmware Version 1.12
 


D750 Firmware Version 1.11
 
Changes from “C” Firmware Version 1.10 to 1.11
 
  • The WT-7 wireless transmitter is now supported.
  • Fixed the following issues:
    • If On was selected for Auto distortion control, distortion would appear at the edges of photos taken with NEF (RAW) + JPEG fine selected for Image quality and Medium selected for Image size.
    • The option chosen for Custom Setting f5 (Customize command dials) > Change main/sub in CUSTOM SETTINGS MENU group f (Controls) would not be saved when Save settings was selected for Save/load settings in the SETUP MENU.
    • Pictures would sometimes not be recorded.
Download: Nikon D750 Firmware Version 1.11
 


D810 Firmware Version 1.12
 
Changes from “C” Firmware Version 1.11 to 1.12
 
  • The WT-7 wireless transmitter is now supported.
  • Fixed the following issues:
    • Multiple exposures were not recorded correctly.
    • Incorrect histograms would be displayed for some images viewed in the RGB histogram display during playback.
    • If On was selected for Auto distortion control, distortion would appear at the edges of photos taken with NEF (RAW) + JPEG fine selected for Image quality and Medium selected for JPEG/TIFF recording > Image size.
    • Photos taken immediately after lenses were exchanged would not be recorded at the correct exposure.
    • The protect icon did not display correctly.
    • If On was selected for Auto distortion control, the camera would stop responding when the user attempted to take pictures with NEF (RAW) + JPEG fine selected for Image quality, Small selected for NEF (RAW) recording > Image size, and RAW primary - JPEG secondary selected for Secondary slot function.
    • Shutter speeds for the electronic front-curtain shutter would sometimes be faster than 1/2000 s.
    • Pictures would sometimes not be recorded.
Download: Nikon D810 Firmware Version 1.12
 


WT-7 Firmware Version 1.1
 
Changes from Firmware Version 1.0 to 1.1
 
  • The D810, D810A, D750, and D7200 are now supported.
  • HTTP server mode is now available in Turkish.
  • Fixed an issue that prevented PASV mode connections to certain f
Download: Nikon WT-7 Firmware Version 1.1
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 3/7/2017 5:19:12 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Monday, March 6, 2017
Just posted: Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8 GM Lens Review.
 
For those able to afford this lens, it is the first Sony lens to buy.
 
Please note that the image quality results currently shown (processed in Lightroom) will soon be replaced with Capture One-processed results. Lightroom forces Sony lens aberration correction (minimally correcting lateral CA) for lenses it has a profile for and lens corrections built into the processing hides lens flaws.
 
B&H has the Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8 GM Lens in stock.
Posted to: Sony News
Post Date: 3/6/2017 7:44:49 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
Tamron has extended its instant and mail-in rebate programs through April 29 with minor changes which went into effect March 5, the most notable change being that the Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD now qualifies for a $100.00 mail-in rebate.
 
Lenses Eligible for Instant Rebates
 
Lenses Eligible for Mail-in Rebates
 
While not officially listed in the rebate material, the Tamron 90mm f/2.8 SP Di MACRO VC USD also qualifies for a $250.00 instant savings.
 
Tamron Rebate Details
 
ModelRebate AmountAuthorized Retailers
Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Lens Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Tamron 16-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Lens Buy$80.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Tamron 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC Lens Buy20.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Lens Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Lens Buy$300.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lens Buy$50.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Tamron 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD Lens Buy$30.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Tamron 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD Lens Buy$50.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Tamron 90mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Macro Lens Buy$250.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Post Date: 3/6/2017 7:23:03 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Sunday, March 5, 2017
Canon has extended its previous instant and mail-in rebate programs (which expired March 4) through April 1 with a few minor (and mostly positive) changes.
 
Instant Rebate Changes
 
Rebate Notes
 
  • There will be a special $180.00 instant rebate on the EOS M5 + 18-150 IS STM kit which will start March 26 and run through April 1
  • Canon EOS Rebel T5 still qualifies for $150.00 - $300.00 instant rebate (unlisted)
  • Canon does not list the Canon Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX and MR-14EX II flashes as being eligible for rebates in the current program, yet B&H has the two flashes discounted with the previous instant rebate through the end of today.
Many lenses still qualify for a mail-in rebate (which were also extended through April 1) if you purchase more than one qualifying lens. If planning to fill multiple spots in your kit, be sure to check out the mail-in rebates to see if you can save even more with your purchase.
 
Canon Instant Rebates
 
ModelRebate AmountAuthorized Retailers
Canon EOS 5Ds Buy$200.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS 5Ds R Buy$200.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS 5D Mark III Buy$300.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS 6D Buy$200.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS 7D Mark II Buy$300.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS 80D Buy$100.00 - $600.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS 70D Buy$300.00 - $550.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS Rebel T6s / 760D Buy$150.00 - $300.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS Rebel T6i / 750D Buy$150.00 - $350.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS Rebel T5i / 700D Buy$200.00 - $400.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS Rebel T6 / 1300D Buy$100.00 - $250.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS Rebel T5 / 1200D Buy$150.00 - $300.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS Rebel SL1 / 100D Buy$150.00 - $350.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS M3 Buy$250.00 - $400.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EOS M10 Buy$150.00 - $170.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Lens Buy$20.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM Lens Buy$50.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM Lens Buy$300.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens Buy$200.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Lens Buy$150.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Lens Buy$50.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens Buy$50.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens Buy$150.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM Lens Buy$150.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM Lens Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM Lens Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM Lens Buy$50.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Lens Buy$200.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens Buy$200.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens Buy$50.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens Buy$50.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM Lens Buy$150.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM Lens Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM Lens Buy$50.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens Buy$20.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM Lens Buy$150.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Lens Buy$70.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM Lens Buy$70.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM Lens Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Lens Buy$70.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro Lens Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Lens Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Canon Speedlite 600EX II-RT Flash Buy$100.00  B&H | Adorama | Amazon
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/5/2017 8:10:17 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Saturday, March 4, 2017
This happy-looking wood duck drake was swimming in the Wissahickon Creek just outside of Philadelphia.
 
A key to good swimming duck photos is to get as low to the water as possible. Then, use a long focal length and a more-distant duck to get the camera angle even closer to level.
 
A larger version of this image is available on BryanCarnathan.com, Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
Post Date: 3/4/2017 8:28:54 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Friday, March 3, 2017

 
From the B&H YouTube Channel:
 
Lightroom provides a complete workflow solution that enables photographers to organize, optimize, and share their photographic images. In this informative and entertaining presentation, Tim Grey shares his tips for best practices for a workflow in Lightroom that will work best for your specific needs. You'll gain a better insight into how Lightroom works, get tips on how to best configure Lightroom, learn how to define your own optimal workflow, and much more.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Post Date: 3/3/2017 2:58:30 PM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
The video above demonstrates that being able to think on your feet – utilizing all of the availble tools at your disposal – can make all the difference in overcoming less than optimal photography conditions.
Post Date: 3/3/2017 11:12:02 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
by Sean Setters
 
I thoroughly enjoy visiting new destinations and reveling in the photographic inspiration that the unfamiliar scene inevitably engenders. My yearning for exploration is often the result of being blind to the beauty of the all-to-familiar locations I've photographed before.
 
There is a way to help tame the bordem with often visited locations, though. Have you ever heard the phrase, "Absense makes the heart grow fonder?" I'm not altogether sure how true the concept is in relationship terms, but the phrase seems perfectly applicable to locations I've visited and photographed numorous times.
 
For instance, I've photographed this Spanish moss-covered Oak several times primarily because it is only a short walk from my home. However, I hadn't photographed it for quite some time when, a couple of days ago, I decided to take a walk with my IR-converted EOS 7D and EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM lens.
 
I've photographed this tree under similar, cloudy circumstances with the very same gear and shared the results here before. While I preferred a tighter framing before, I found that the freshly-cut field aided in isolating the tree in the scene thereby allowing a looser framed image to have more impact. It was a minor difference, but one that made a definitive impact on my framing preference. One could also argue that having photographed the tree from a closer perspective meant that I was subconsciously looking for a reason to find/utilize a new perspective, and that would be a fair point. But seeing a familiar scene with fresh eyes helps to get one's creative juices flowing, and being familiar with a location means you're better able to seek out and capitalize on those minor differences that can have positive impacts on your already-photographed location imagery.
 
For the shot above, the exposure settings were f/2.8, 1/2000 second and ISO 100.
 
During post processing, I first inverted the red and blue color channels in and then desaturated the yellow hues to achieve the traditional IR white foliage look while maintaining the blue color captured by the Super Color IR sensor. Click on the image above for access to a higher resolution version.
 
As the promise of brand new foliage fills the warming seasonal air, now is the time to send your (older, seldom used?) camera in for an infrared conversion to take advantage of the IR photography opportunties that lie ahead.
 
Learn more about infrared photography and IR conversions in our Infrared Camera Conversion by LifePixel Review.
Post Date: 3/3/2017 10:43:26 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Sigma:
 
SIGMA ELECTRONIC FLASH EF-630 F/CANON is scheduled to start the shipment in MARCH.
 
The SIGMA ELECTRONIC FLASH EF-630 is a multifunctional clip-on type flash, which offers a greater output of light with a guide number 63. Among the diverse features loaded on this flash is TTL exposure control as standard as well as high-speed sync, rear-curtain sync and wireless flash functions. The Auto zoom function which is designed to work with focal length 24-200mm, bounce-flash function, Wide Panel and Catch-light Panel of the EF-630 are perfect for various kinds of photography. The rear LCD offers an intuitive user interface for fast and easy operation. For instance, the new dot matrix liquid crystal display ensures improved visibility of setting status and menu function, and D-Pad and dial on the side of the flashgun make changing settings easier than ever.
 
Key Features:
Intuitive user interface for ease of use
The new dot matrix liquid crystal display is incorporated for this flash. Moreover, the D-Pad and dial on the side of the flashgun make changing settings, such as TTL auto exposure system, wireless flash, FP flash and rear-curtain sync, on the main screen and setup menu displayed on the LCD easier than ever. The flash is designed to disengage easily by one-click on the shoe lock lever. In addition, a flash sync terminal and notification beep sound when the flashgun is fully charged improves ease of use.
 
Guide Number 63 offering a greater output of light
The maximum guide number is 63 for a high light level (when the focal length is 200mm). It is possible to change the illumination angle from 24mm wide to 200mm telephoto. It also covers an angle of a 17mm when used with the built-in Wide Panel.
 
Three light distribution modes
The flash is designed to work in three light distribution modes. Normal emission mode has basic light distribution for general photography, and another mode prioritizes guide number to obtain an even larger output. Flat light distribution mode has a characteristic of uniform light distribution by reducing the fall off of peripheral light. It is possible to select the mode in accordance with the purpose.
 
Bounce-flash function with movable flash head
The flash head of the EF-630 can be tilted up by as much as 90°and can swivel both left and right by 180°. Bounce photography, where light is reflected off a white wall, ceiling or a reflector increases the range of photographic expression. The flash head can also be tilted down by 7°for close-up shots.
 
Wireless TTL Flash Function
The wireless TTL flash function will adjust the desired flash exposure automatically by flash light even if the EF-630 is detached from the camera. Remote control operation is possible between the camera and flash. When multiple flash units are used, the camera calculates the correct exposure automatically.
 
Slave Flash Function
Slave Flash can be used with all camera models and it allows the flash to be fired away from the camera by the master unit though it is not possible to set flash exposure automatically. The Designated Slave function for EF-630 allows the photographer to use two or more EF-630 flash units simultaneously. It is possible to designate flashguns by using different channel settings. In the Normal Slave mode, it is also possible to use the camera's built-in flash or another flash unit as the Master.
 
FP Flash function for high shutter speeds
Cameras with flash focal plane shutters cannot perform flash photography at shutter speeds faster than the fixed synchronization speed as it is usually limited to coincide with the fully open shutter. The FP flash function makes flash photography possible at shutter speeds greater than the fixed synchronization speed. When the lens diaphragm is set to larger apertures to limit depth of field in synchronized daytime shooting, high shutter speeds can be used to balance the daylight and the flashlight at any shutter speed.
 
Rear-curtain Sync flash function for natural representation of motion
When photographing a moving subject, the Rear-curtain Sync mode allows the flash to be triggered immediately before the rear-curtain of the shutter closes. Unlike Front-curtain Sync, this mode records blurred trails behind a moving subject rather than in front for a more natural expression of motion.
 
Multiple Flash Photography
In a single frame it is possible to capture the frozen-in-motion image of a subject by a series of light bursts.
 
AF assist light for accurate auto-focus in low light conditions
Accurate AF may not be possible in dark conditions. However, the AF assist light of the EF-630 allows effective AF between approximately 0.7m and 10m.
 
Manual flash power level control
The flash power level of the EF-630 can be set manually from 1/1 to 1/128 in 1/3 EV increments to meet the photographer’s needs.
 
Modeling Flash function to check for shadow
The EF-630 also offers a modeling flash function, enabling the user to check for reflections and shadows before taking a photograph.
 
Custom Mode Function
The Custom Mode Function is available to register two settings with the photographer’s preference. It is easy to set it with D-Pad and dial on the side of the flashgun.
 
Notification beep sound
When the notification beep sound is turned on by the switch at the front of the flash, it is possible to check the status of flash such as whether it is fully charged, exposure is ok, as well as error alert only by the sound without looking at the LCD display.
 
Auto Power-Off function prevents power waste
To conserve battery life, the EF-630 will automatically turn off after a certain period of time of inactivity.
 
Catch Light Panel
This flash is equipped with a built-in catch light panel, which can highlight the eyes of the subject when the bounce flash mode is activated.
 
Synchronic Terminal
The EF-630 is equipped with a Synchronization Terminal to connect a camera with the commercially available synchronization cable.
 
Regular firmware updates
Photographers can update the firmware via the newly developed optional FLASH USB DOCK FD-11(Sold separately). The firmware can be updated by attaching the EF-630 to the FD-11 and then connecting the FD-11, via a USB cable, to a personal computer on which the exclusive software SIGMA Optimization Pro has been installed.
Specifications
Power source : Four AA Alkaline or AA NiCd or Ni-MH (Nickel Metal Hydride) batteries
Guide Number : 63 (200/fit) ISO100/m (with the zoom head at 200mm)
Illumination angle : Automatically set in accordance with the focal length of the lens, in a range from 24mm to 200mm. Also covers the angle of a 17mm lens when used with the built-in Wide Panel.
Bounce angle (Up) : 0, 60, 75, 90 degrees
Bounce angle (Right) : 0, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150, 180 degrees
Bounce angle (Left) : 0, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150, 180 degrees
Bounce angle (Down) : 0, 7 degrees
Dimensions (W X H X D) : 79.4mm×148.4mm×121.5mm / 3.1in. X 5.8in. X 4.8 in.
Weight : 490g/17.3oz. (without battery)
Corresponding cameras : SIGMA, CANON, NIKON
Barcode:SIGMA 0085126 932923, CANON 0085126 932909, NIKON 0085126 932916
Sigma FD 11 Flash USB Dock

Optional Accessory – FLASH USB DOCK FD-11
 
This accessory is used to dock EF-630 and update its firmware in the exclusive SIGMA Optimization Pro software. The dock is connected to a personal computer via a USB cable.
 
Barcode: SIGMA 0085126 801564, CANON 0085126 801540, NIKON 0085126 801557
Release date: SIGMA: Available, CANON:March, 2017, NIKON: TBD
 
B&H has the Sigma Electronic Flash EF-630 and FD-11 Flash USB Dock available for preorder.
Post Date: 3/3/2017 8:39:47 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
It has been a while since we took a look at the oldest Canon lens list and I was wondering what that list was looking like today. Since I was wondering, I thought perhaps some of you might also want to see the list. So, here it is:
 
Lens ModelYear
1Canon EF 50mm f/2.5 Macro Lens Buy1987
2Canon EF 100mm f/2 USM Lens Buy1991
3Canon TS-E 45mm f/2.8 Tilt-Shift Lens Buy1991
4Canon TS-E 90mm f/2.8 Tilt-Shift Lens Buy1991
5Canon EF 20mm f/2.8 USM Lens Buy1992
6Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Lens Buy1992
7Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Lens Buy1993
8Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Lens Buy1993
9Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM Lens Buy1995
10Canon EF 28mm f/1.8 USM Lens Buy1995
11Canon EF 180mm f/3.5L USM Macro Lens Buy1996
12Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM Lens Buy1996
13Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM Lens Buy1996
14Canon EF 300mm f/4L IS USM Lens Buy1997
15Canon EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Lens Buy1998

 
At 30 years of age, the 50mm macro is older than many in this audience! However, I'm guessing that there is another lens in this list that you would more-prefer to see an update of.
 
We don’t have any specific inside information on what’s coming down Canon’s development pipeline, but I'm guessing the prospect of an updated EF 50mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.8, or 135mm f/2 might seem especially enticing to you. Or, perhaps adding IS to the 400mm f/5.6L or 180mm f/3.5L Macro (or any of the other non-IS lenses) sounds appealing to you.
 
Which lens updates would you most like to see hit the market in the not-so-distant future?
 
Which of these lenses no longer has a purpose and should simply be discontinued without a replacement?
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/3/2017 7:51:20 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
eBay (via photovideo4less – 100% Positive Feedback) has the Nikon D500 DSLR Camera available for $1,619.95 with free shipping. Compare at $1,996.95.
 
Note: This is likely a grey market item and therefore would not qualify for a Nikon USA warranty.
Posted to: Nikon News
Post Date: 3/3/2017 7:45:54 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
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