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 Monday, March 27, 2017
Post Date: 3/27/2017 1:46:02 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Through 3/28, use coupon code PXFLASHMA4 at AdoramaPix to get 25% off sitewide.
 
Use the coupon code to save on items such as:
 
  • Photo Prints
  • Collage Prints
  • Framed Prints
  • Metal Prints
  • Canvas Prints
  • Photo Books
  • Hudson Albums
  • Calendars
  • Custom Cards
Post Date: 3/27/2017 12:22:09 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
One of my jobs is to ensure adequate funding to keep things going here and that is the topic I need to bring to your attention at this time. In order for us to continue to serve you, we need your help. Asking for support is not something I like to do – I much prefer that that adequate support just comes in naturally, but ... we do need your help (don't assume someone else will provide it) and I need to make you aware of that. Hopefully you find the site of value and are interested supporting us!
 
Here are the ways you can help:
 
1. Use the Links on the Site for Your Shopping
 
This is our primary support mechanism and it is my favorite way to receive support as it costs you nothing extra and you are buying what you want/need. With each purchase made after clicking on one of the links on the site, we receive a small commission (or what equates to such) from the retailer. While buying camera gear may seem obvious, the purchase of anything else used around the home, office, shop, studio, farm, etc. also works. Especially Amazon and eBay carry far more than photo products, including tires, clothing, diapers, breakfast cereal, pet food, many other supplies that you buy regularly – even cars. Just remember to click on the links here before shopping for the win-win scenario.
 
Below are some of the site's most popular retailers and we list many more here, including many international retailers.
 
Using this link to make your B&H purchase supports this site and my family   Using this link to place your Amazon.com order supports this site.   Using this link to place your Adorama order supports this site.   Using this link to place your eBay order supports this site.   Using this link to place your Wex Photographic order supports this site and my family   Using this link to place your Amazon.co.uk order supports this site and my family   Using this link to place your DigitalRev order supports this site and my family
 
 
2. Direct Support
 
Prefer to shop elsewhere or off-line? Or, not shopping right now? You can still support the site through direct donations. The best time is right now before you forget. The process is very fast and easy.
 
Note that, if viewing from a feed reader or via social, these support forms may not work correctly. Simply visit the support page for a working form.
 

Consider a recurring monthly donation as a subscription to the site.
Recurring Donation

 
3. Tell Others
 
A no-cost way to support the site is to simply tell others about it. If you have a website, perhaps add a link to TDP from a relevant page on the site.
 
Are you using social networking sites such as Facebook, Google+ and Twitter? "Follow", "Share", "Like", "+1", "Tweet", etc. The-Digital-Picture.com and the various pages on the site to share with the world. You will find buttons throughout the site to make this process easy. Similar to the adding links to the site, using word of mouth, newsletters and other methods to tell others about the site increases the number of site visitors which is very helpful. And, hopefully they will find the information here to be useful and view your sharing in a very positive light for another win-win situation.
 
 
We are very appreciative of the opportunity to serve you and look forward to doing so long into the future! Thanks for your support!
 
Bryan Carnathan
Bryan Carnathan
Post Date: 3/27/2017 9:05:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
B&H has Ruggard Electronic Dry Cabinets (30L & 80L) available for preorder with free expedited shipping.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Electronically Controlled Dehumidifier
  • Reduces Humidity
  • Protects Stored Items from Dust and Dirt
Category: Preorders
Post Date: 3/27/2017 10:31:12 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
B&H has select WD External Hard Drives on sale for up to $40.00 off. In all, 32 drives/combo drives are discounted.
Post Date: 3/27/2017 10:18:58 AM CT   Posted By: Sean

 
While many cameras have built-in GPS these days, many older cameras do not. And even if your camera does have GPS, you may have forgotten to turn it on before your last shooting adventure. This is where a handy, easy-to-use feature of Lightroom can help.
 
The secret is to use your smartphone to take a picture at the same location where you're using your DSLR and copy the smartphone image's GPS data for use with your DSLR images. See the video above for specific details.
 
B&H carries Adobe Photography Plan subscriptions.
Post Date: 3/27/2017 6:03:00 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
From Cactus:
 
TTL without Boundaries! Cactus launches FREE firmware upgrades on the V6 II and V6 IIs to support wireless cross-brand TTL.
 
Hong Kong, March Hong Kong, March24, 2017 – Just nine months since the release of the Cactus V6 II and Cactus V6 IIs, Cactus is now launching a series of brand-specific firmware upgrades to transform the cross-brand HSS flash triggers to one that also supports cross-brandwireless wireless wireless TTL.
 
The new X-TTL firmware versions, apart from supporting cross-brand high-speed sync (HSS/FP), remote power and zoom control of Canon, Fujifilm, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Pentax and Sigma flashes all at the same time 1, NOW support automatic TTL automatic TTL exposure in the same cross-brand environment, both exposure on-camera and off-camera.2 The first wave of firmware releases will be for Sigma, Sony ma Sony and Fujifilm Fujifilm Fujifilm. Other camera systems, Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic and Pentax, will follow one by one as we complete system integration on the V6 II. All these X-TTL firmware versions are freeof charge of charge of charge for V6 II / V6 IIs users. The new firmware is system-specific specific specific so users simply choose the corresponding system when updating with the Cactus Firmware Updater. Once installed, the V6 II / V6 IIs is transformed into a cross-brand wireless TTL flash trigger.
 
This unique function gives photographers an unprecedented flexibility. The need for matching flashes with the same camera system for on and off-camera TTL flash photography is over – TTL without boundaries.
 
Cross-brand TTL
 
The X-TTL firmware allows users to have wireless TT wireless TTL automatic exposure wireless TTL automatic exposure with camera L automatic exposure and flash that runs on the same system, such as a Canon camera triggering a Canon flash, and one that runs on different systems, such as a Sigma camera triggering a Nikon system flash.
 
Similar to the cross-brand HSS firmware on the V6 II, the supported flash systems for wireless cross-brand TTL include Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, and flash that runs on the same camera system.
 
Two unique Exposure Locks
 
Cactus is unveiling a brand new approach in using TTL metering. Over the past, professionals who love the convenience from TTL metering often have to suffer inconsistency in lighting outputs, making post processing a pain. In view of this Cactus devised two types of Exposure Locks.
 
  1. Flash Compensate: Store a desired flash exposure that will automatically adjust according to changes in camera settings. Gone is the ever-changing flash exposures between each TTL metering.
  2. Flash Power Lock: Lock flash power output after a desired TTL exposure is achieved. Perfect for consistency in repeat shooting.
Wireless TTL functions
 
The X-TTL firmware will also support advanced TTL functions on the Cactus V6 II and V6 IIs, such as first and second (rear) curtain sync, on-camera TTL, group TTL metering and TTL lighting ratios.
 
New support for Sigma
 
We are delighted to offer firmware support for Sigma cameras and flashes. This includes remote power control, remote zoom control, wireless High-speed Sync, and wireless TTL with Sigma’s SA-TTL flashes. The same cross-brand support is also available on the Sigma X-TTL firmware.
 
Cactus expresses appreciation to SIGMA CORPORATION for their immense support in our development for Sigma system firmware.
 
Fujifilm TTL and HSS
 
With the introduction of Fujifilm new flash system launched on the EF-X500, Highspeed Sync (HSS/FP) is finally available. Besides adopting the new HSS platform, the upcoming Fujifilm X-TTL firmware also extends support for wireless TTL to Fujifilm flashes as well as Canon, Nikon, Olympus, and Panasonic flashes. Fujifilm X-TTL Firmware release date will be announced on our website.
 
V6 IIs with Sony TTL
 
Existing Sony V6 IIs users already has a system-specific transceiver unit, and the upcoming Sony X-TTL firmware adds wireless TTL support for Sony flashes and other system flashes when paired with the Cactus V6 II. Sony X-TTL Firmware release date will be announced on our website.
 
Features at a glance
 
  • Cross-brand wireless wireless wireless manual power and zoom manual power and zoom manual power and zoom control control control with HSS/FP support of Canon, Fujifilm, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Pentax and Sony flashes
  • Cross-brand wireless wireless wireless TTL of Canon, Fujifilm, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Pentax, Sigma and Sony flashes
  • Cross-brand g brand g brand group TTL metering roup TTL metering roup TTL metering is extended to use in a cross-brand setup
  • TTL Ratios output adjustments can be done directly TTL Ratios on the V6 II (TX)
  • Two Exposure Locks offer consistency with the conve Two Exposure Locks nience of wireless TTL.
  • Worksseamlessly with Cactus RF60X seamlessly with Cactus RF60X seamlessly with Cactus RF60X to support HSS, TTL, remote power and zoom control.
Price and Availability
 
System-specific X-TTL firmware versions are free of charge of charge of charge. Download the Cactus Firmware Updater and select the corresponding system firmware to install the X-TTL firmware on the Cactus V6 II and V6 IIs.
 
After launching the initial three systems, i.e., Sigma, Fujifilm and Sony, Cactus will continue to launch X-TTL firmware for the remaining camera systems.
 
B&H carries the Cactus Wireless Flash Transceiver V6 II.
Category: Cactus News
Post Date: 3/27/2017 5:38:14 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Through midnight tonight Eastern Time, B&H has the Vidpro Professional Photo & Video LED Light Kit available for $89.95 with free standard delivery. Regularly $139.95.
 
Product Features
 
  • 96 LED Video Light
  • Adjustable Hot-Shoe / Tripod Mount
  • 3200K Tungsten Filter
  • 4200K Soft Diffuser
  • Li-ion Rechargeable Battery
  • European Adapter / Battery Charger
  • Vertical Interlock Accessory
  • Foam Padded Hard Carry Case
  • Adjustable Stepless Dimmer
  • Magnetic Mounting System
Post Date: 3/27/2017 5:03:21 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Saturday, March 25, 2017
I've wanted to add an image of a densely-packed flock of flying snow geese to the porfolio for a long time. But, it was not until this year until I accomplished this task.
 
The first priority for photographing a flock of snow geese is ... to find a flock of snow geese. For many of us, when flocks of snow geese arrive is based on the birds' migration patterns. Find where these flocks typically travel and time your visit with theirs.
 
A good method of determining when the birds have arrived (or are expected to arrive) is to use wildlife management area status reports, including the historical reports as history in this form tends to repeat. While these reports are great aids to finding the flocks, remember that an entire population of these birds can completely leave an area within minutes. A location that is great on one day may be completely empty the next.
 
With a warmer winter than normal, the snow geese migrated early this year and, at the urging of two friends, I too went early. The location was Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area. Located at the border of northern Lancaster County and southern Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, this WMA is an about-2-hour drive from my house. While this is not a famous snow geese bucket list location that photographers most-target, the population at this location was estimated to be at least 50,000 on this day. And, that's a LOT of geese.
 
Mostly the white geese were swimming on the small lake, appearing as a large iceberg, or they were feeding in a nearby field, causing a small hill to appear snow-capped. While the huge numbers of geese in either of these two environments were interesting, the real show happened when they flew as a group. Even if one wasn't paying attention when the geese took off, a low thunder-like rumble was unmistakable and, if the flight path was overhead, the sky would darken (and an umbrella may be desired for protection from the strafing).
 
When photographing an individual bird, framing decisions are made in an at least somewhat more-controlled manner than when photographing a flock of birds. One reason that geese flock together is to make it more difficult for a predator to single out one bird as its prey and these flocks can have the same effect on photographers. With seemingly random chaos occurring, how does one create an attractive image?
 
Here are some thoughts for the flock:
 
The first thought is to simply go back to the basics. Start with focal length selection.
 
Perspective comes into play, but if you are photographing a flock of now-flying geese, it is likely too late to get a different perspective. Plan for that earlier, but ... geese always fly wherever they want to and predicting where they will fly will often be challenging. Predict as best you can (they like to take off and land into the wind) and react quickly to what happens.
 
How far away are the geese, how large is the flock and how wide of an area are the birds covering? If it is a small flock a long distance away and the birds are densely packed, a longer focal length will likely be best. That is, best unless more of the landscape is desired to be in the frame in order to create an environmental-type image. If the geese are close, the flock is large and/or the birds are widely spread out, a shorter telephoto lens might be a better choice.
 
For my Middle Creek WMA shoot, the birds went where they wanted to go, access was limited and even if it wasn't, moving fast enough to catch a flock of geese required some form of powered mobility. So, embracing what was available was, as often is, the thing to do. To handle this situation, I had a full frame Canon EOS 5Ds R and 600mm f/4L IS II Lens tripod-mounted using a Wimberley Tripod Head II. In the MindShift Gear FirstLight 40L at my feet was a second 5Ds R with a 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II mounted. When the flocks were far away, I used the 600. When the snow geese storm moved overhead in big numbers, I grabbed the 100-400. And when the squall became widespread overhead, I had the EF-M 15-45 on the EOS M5 ready to catch that scene as well.
 
Note that I started out this day with a 1.4x extender behind the 600mm lens, but quickly determined that the heat waves were too strong and sharp results were not possible at this magnification. Even at 600mm, many of my distant images were not tack-sharp until after the sun went low enough in the sky to end the heat source creating the air disturbance. So, yes, it is very possible to have too much focal length even if that focal length is more ideal for the scene as the additional magnification may be wasted.
 
The shutter speed required for sharp birds depends on how fast their details are moving across the pixels on the sensor. A large-in-the-frame bird moving at high speed across an ultra-high resolution imaging sensor requires a much faster shutter speed than a small-in-the-frame bird sitting on the lake does when using a lower resolution camera. Aperture and ISO settings are then balanced for depth of field and noise with the desired brightness being the other side of the equation. In regards to brightness, use care to not blow the white highlights on the birds, leaving no details in the white. If the birds were flying, I was mostly using a 1/1600 shutter speed and an aperture of f/8 or narrower was usually best to keep more birds in focus. Once the light faded, I began experimenting with much longer shutter speeds for a panning motion blur effect.
 
Bryan's Law of Bird Photography: The frame in a high speed burst containing the perfect wing position, head position, background alignment and lighting will time perfectly with the bird's blink.
 
When photographing birds, using the camera's high speed burst mode is often the rule. Especially with multiple birds in the frame, having many images to select from is going to be a big advantage for many of the above reasons.
 
I usually use only one specific AF point or one point plus the surrounding points. But, when a huge flock of geese is filling the frame, using the all-points-active can work very well, allowing you to concentrate on composition while the camera figures out which of the closest birds should be focused on.
 
Composition always matters and usually, the goal is a balanced composition. When such a huge flock of birds is flying, you need to figure out what a balanced composition is very quickly and see that in the frame no later than as it happens. The bottom line is that, unless you are shooting for someone else, if you are happy with the image, you nailed it. But, we are always trying to improve our skills and there are some composition variants that work well for the snow geese storm.
 
If the goose density is extremely heavy, just fill the frame with the geese and shoot away. Singling out specific birds is very challenging if they are not large in the frame and you are unlikely to notice the background through all of the geese. The huge quantity of birds essentially becomes a pattern and everyone likes pattern images, right?
 
If possible, determine which direction (in relation to the camera) the birds are flying and focus on your preference. I prefer an approaching side view, but all of the other directions have their own photogenic advantages, showing differing views of the geese bodies. If a large flock is flying within a location, such as over a lake, they may fly in a circular motion and you may sometimes have a choice. So, be ready to identify what you are looking for.
 
If the birds are not dense enough to hide the background, the background showing through must be considered in the composition. If the background is mostly a solid color, such as the side of a mountain, there may not be much concern in that regard. The background will be evenly colored and that often works well for flock backgrounds. It is hard to go wrong with a blue sky background for the white birds and images with birds flying against a sunset sky often look great.
 
Contrast draws the viewer's eye. If the background includes strong lines of contrast, such as where the land and sky meet or a waterline (often present where there are waterfowl), it is good to carefully position these lines in the frame. Use your landscape photography skills here – perhaps taking advantage of the rule of thirds.
 
When sitting or swimming snow geese flocks take off, they often peel away from one side of the flock in a surprisingly orderly fashion. The line between the stationary and flying birds can be incorporated into the composition.
 
When the birds are not filling the entire frame, additional compositional elements must be considered. Where the flock is positioned in the frame is a big consideration and again, the rule of thirds may be a good choice in these cases.
 
In the image I am sharing here, I could have filled the entire frame with a rather-high density of geese, but chose to include the water in the very bottom of the frame. I often like to keep a clean bottom frame border, giving the image a base to be built upon. Having the water in the frame in this case meant that some geese can be seen landing in addition to those still in flight.
 
When the flock was farther away, I often kept additional frame borders clean (void of geese) as well (especially the top border).
 
Especially if using an ultra-high resolution camera, don't forget that you can crop the image to create a better composition later.
 
Lighting always matters. At this location, I arrived early in the afternoon, giving me time to do some on-site scouting and planning to be ready for the late-day, low-angle, warm-colored light. Again, the birds fly when and where they want to fly and good images can be made at various light angles, but the sun at your back, your shadow towards the birds, early and late in the day is usually a sure-thing for wildlife lighting conditions. As mentioned earlier, shooting into the sunset can also work well, but be very careful to not look at the sun through a telephoto lens as serious permanent eye damage can occur. On a clear day, the sky opposite the nearly-set sun will also turn pink, creating a pastel background for your birds.
 
While a cloudy day will not provide the same illumination, the giant softbox effect from a cloudy sky results in a soft light with a lower dynamic range for greatly-reduced shadows and easier to control exposures. Ultra-bright, solidly cloudy skies may cause a background brightness issues when the birds are above the skyline. In this case, consider exposing the sky to be pure white for a high key effect. Or, there is nothing wrong with a gray background and silhouetting the birds is a strategy that can work.
 
At the onset of this trip, one of my goals was to capture frames densely-filled with geese, perhaps even with no background remaining. While I don't think any of my images were completely void of background, many images have multiple thousands of geese in them and some have very little background remaining. In addition to getting some fun images, it was a great learning experience and it was especially great to experience this phenomenal nature event.
 
Now, check the forecast and go find your own snow geese storm!
 
A larger version of this image is available on BryanCarnathan.com, Flickr, Google+, Facebook and 500px. If reading from a news feed reader, click through to see the framed image.
Post Date: 3/25/2017 8:00:00 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
B&H has the newly announced Apple 9.7" iPads available for preorder.
 
Update: Technically, you can't follow through with the preorder until tonight, 8:30 PM EDT.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • 9.7" Multi-Touch Retina Display
  • 2048 x 1536 Screen Resolution (264 ppi)
  • Apple A9 64-bit SoC with M9 Coprocessor
Category: Preorders
Post Date: 3/25/2017 8:28:40 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Friday, March 24, 2017
by Sean Setters
 
While a sharp image is often most desireable, sometimes increased sharpness is counterproductive to achieveing specific photographic goals. For instance, lately I've been intrigued by slow shutter speeds and the motion blur recorded as a result of their use. Specifically, I've recently been using the RigWheels RigMount X4 Magnetic Camera Platform for automotive photography.
 
While I'm finding the camera platform to be an exciting tool to have in my kit, its not necessarily an inexpensive piece of gear and its uses outside of automotive photography are somewhat limited. But using the RigMount X4 got me thinking about other ways of capturing motion and the world of artistic possibilites at our fingertips, especially if nothing in the frame remains sharp as a result of one's chosen exposure variables.
 
With that in mind, I recently made set out with my camera in hand with a goal of creating a totally motion blurred image that looked more like "art" and less like "a mistake." With the goal of few (if any) details being discernable, I didn't have to go far to find a suitable location. The scene I chose was the normally-not-very-photogenic view seen across the street from my home. After about 20 attempts (using various panning/rotating techniques), I had a motion blurred image that intrigued me enough to post-process (seen above).
 
To capture the image, I used a Canon EOS 5D Mark III and EF 17-40mm f/4L USM (with a 4-stop ND filter) with the following settings: 40mm, f/6.3, 2 sec, ISO 200. I held the camera level to the ground and panned from right-to-left while bouncing the camera up and down (as if it were a bouncing ball) during the 2-second exposure which created seemingly the intertwined flowing lines seen in the image. For post processing, I applied vignetting correction and increased the image's saturation/vibrancy/clarity in Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop CC. For what it's worth, I ended up liking the end result so much that it's now my smartphone's wallpaper (slightly croped and rotated 90-degrees).
 
We invite you to share your artistically motion blurred images in the comments below.
Post Date: 3/24/2017 8:51:00 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
Expired: Amazon has the Adobe Photoshop Elements 15 & Premiere Elements 15 available for $69.99. Regularly $124.99.
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Turn frowns upside down Transform frowns into smiles, adjust squinting eyes and make other quick tweaks, so everyone in your photos looks their best.
  • Guided Edits for help along the way Photoshop Elements offers 45 Guided Edits that step you through to fantastic results.
  • Picture incredible text Get step-by-step help turning a photo into cool visual text and then adding an embossed look and drop shadows to really make it pop. Great for collages, scrapbook pages, cards, signs, and more.
  • System Requirement Note: Only compatible with 64-bit processors
Through this weekend, B&H has select Camera Creatures on sale for $11.99 each. Regularly $19.99 each.
 
Alternately, you can get both props for $19.99.
 
If you've ever photographed young children, you likely know how difficult it can be to get and/or hold their attention. These props look as if they could make photographing children a little easier. [Sean]
 
Product Highlights
 
  • Keeps Kids Focused On the Camera
  • Unique Attention Grabber
  • Fits Most Camera Lenses
  • Built-In Squeaker
Post Date: 3/24/2017 5:19:17 AM CT   Posted By: Sean
 Thursday, March 23, 2017
B&H has the Tamron 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 Di II VC HLD Lens in stock with free expedited shipping.
Post Date: 3/23/2017 4:11:48 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
Through March 27, use coupon code C20SPRING (20% off) during checkout at eBay to get the Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens (via redtagcamera – 99.9% Positive Feedback) available for $111.99 with free shipping. Compare at $179.00 after $20.00 instant savings.
 
Note: The coupon code (20% off, $50.00 max) is single-use only (per eBay account) and can also be used on other select purchases on eBay.
 
This lens is small, lightweight, inexpensive, easy to pack and features surprisingly good image quality. At this price, this lens is a fantastic bargain. [Sean]
Post Date: 3/23/2017 4:10:42 PM CT   Posted By: Sean
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