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 Tuesday, March 26, 2013
Canon EOS Rebel T5i
Here is a list of changes/upgrades in the Rebel T5i from the Rebel T4i:

  • New Finish
  • 360° Rotation Mode Dial
  • Larger and Raised Icons on the Mode Dial
  • Addition of Scene Mode to the Mode Dial
  • Digital Zoom during Movie Recording
  • Real-time preview of creative filters in Live View
  • New 18-55mm STM Kit Lens
Canon informed me that the entire imaging pipeline is the same. Same AF system as well.
 
While I would of course rather have the newer model, the above-listed additional benefits will set you back, at announcement time, an additional $100.00 USD for the body-only and $250.00 USD for the 18-55mm lens kit (with the $150 instant rebate in effect).
 
Am I missing something? Or should the T5i perhaps be better-named the T4iN?
 
Is anyone going to pay the price for these minor T5i upgrades?
 
Is a full T5i review worth the significant time and cost required to create?
 
Let me know what you think over at our Facebook page.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/26/2013 7:43:58 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Canon 5D Mark III
The trip to Hawaii was my first major photo trip using Canon 5D Mark III bodies.
 
The Canon 1Ds Mark III and Canon 5D Mark II were my primary camera bodies on prior trips. On these prior trips, I would typically need to clean each camera sensor (2 or 3 of them) every two or three days - and invariably would end up with dust in most landscape pictures. It was not unusual for me to spend days cloning dust spots out of my images after each trip.
 
Not this time. I took two 5D III bodies, shot intensely for over two weeks, and had no sensor dust the entire time. I hate sensor dust, I hate cleaning sensors and I find having to clean sensor dust from my images to be a waste of my time (but necessary). To me, the 5D III and other similar recent Canon DSLR cameras are worth the upgrade cost for the improved sensor self-cleaning features alone.
 
I also made great use of the 5D Mark III's built-in horizon level on this trip. Photographs with water against the horizon are unforgiving in revealing how level your camera was. And rotating an image to correct levelness is destructive at the pixel level. Not all of my images from this trip are perfectly level, but a much higher percentage are.
 
Two days into my trip, while perched on a high, narrow, very dry piece of volcanic rock to get a better angle for shooting waves, I took a major hit from a rogue wave. The wave came completely over me, the 5D III and the Canon 70-300mm L Lens I was using. A major amount of water was running off of the camera, the lens and me - like a waterfall.
 
I fortunately maintained my balance, but I was not pleased to see the significant amount of salt water on my gear. I quickly ran to the car and dried everything with a towel (I typically have one along when shooting in such an environment). I didn't expect to have any problems and was relieved to find the camera and lens to be working fine. That camera body and lens continued to work fine the duration of the trip - even after shooting in the rain on a few occasions. Weather sealing has definite value.
 
That strong wind makes sharp image capture a challenge was driven home on this trip. IS definitely helps, but ... sometimes faster shutter speeds rule. I would seldom trade high ISO noise for subject motion blur. Just sayin.
 
The Canon 70-300 L and Canon 24-70mm f/4 L IS were my two primary lenses used on this mostly-landscape photography trip. Both performed very well.
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 3/12/2013 7:51:34 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, December 15, 2010
Firmware Update Version 1.0.8 is now available for the Canon EOS 60D.
 
Firmware version 1.0.8 incorporates the following fix:
 
Fixes a phenomenon in which captured images may become overexposed when using the camera's built-in flash or an external Speedlite in combination with the lenses listed below:
 
a) EF300/4 L IS USM
b) EF28-135/3.5-5.6 IS USM
c) EF75-300/4-5.6 IS USM
d) EF100-400/4.5-5.6 L IS USM
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/15/2010 8:19:46 PM CT   Posted By: Bryan
 Wednesday, December 01, 2010
Canon Japan is offering a Locking Mode Dial Upgrade (English) for owners of Canon EOS 7D and Canon EOS 5D Mark II DSLRs.
 
Starting December 8th, 2010, Canon Japan will convert 7D and 5D II mode dials into the locking type seen on the Canon EOS 60D for $10,500 yen (about $125.00 USD). There is no information at this time on other Canon divisions offering this service.
 
Update: Canon Canada has now announced this service:
 
Thank you for using Canon products.
 
Effective Dec 1st 2010, Canon will start to provide as a chargeable service, a locking mode dial modification for the “EOS 5D MarkII” and “EOS 7D” digital single-lens reflex cameras.
 
This modification is available, for a fee, to owners of these cameras who would prefer a Mode Dial which locks in place and can’t be accidentally moved during normal camera operation.
 
For Canadian residents, the pricing of the locking mode dial modification service for EOS 5D Mark II and 7D cameras has been set at $110 per camera as of December, 2010. (Pricing and availability subject to change without notice.) For further details, see contact information for inquiries below.
 
Once modified, users must first press and hold down the central lock-release button in order to turn the Mode Dial. The modification is intended to prevent the Mode Dial from accidentally moving, once set to a particular exposure mode by the user.
 
Applicable Products
 
EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR Cameras
EOS 7D Digital SLR Cameras
 
Contact Information for Inquiries
 
Canon Canada Inc.
Customer Information Centre
Phone:1-800-OK-CANON (toll free)
1-800-652-2666
Support options and hours of operation: Monday to Friday 9AM to 8PM ET (excluding holidays)
 
(Thanks Bill)
 
Update 2: Canon USA now offering the upgrade service:
 
Effective December 6, 2010, Canon will start to provide as a chargeable service, a locking mode dial modification for the “EOS 5D MarkII” and “EOS 7D” digital single-lens reflex cameras.
 
This modification is available, for a fee, to owners of these cameras who would prefer a Mode Dial which locks in place and can’t be accidentally moved during normal camera operation.
 
For USA residents, the pricing of the locking mode dial modification service for EOS 5D Mark II and 7D cameras has been set at $100 per camera as of December, 2010. (Pricing and availability subject to change without notice.) For further details, see contact information for inquiries below.
 
Once modified, users must first press and hold down the central lock-release button in order to turn the Mode Dial. The modification is intended to prevent the Mode Dial from accidentally moving, once set to a particular exposure mode by the user.
 
Applicable Products
EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR Cameras
EOS 7D Digital SLR Cameras
 
Thank you,
Customer Support Operations
Canon U.S.A., Inc.
 
Contact Information for Inquiries:
Canon U.S.A., Inc.
Canon Customer Support Center
Phone: 1-800-OK-CANON / 1-800-652-2666
TTD: 1-866-251-3752
E-mail: carecenter@cits.canon.com
 
Support options and hours of operation: http://www.usa.canon.com/support
Posted to: Canon News
Post Date: 12/1/2010 9:39:44 AM CT   Posted By: Bryan
   
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